Windows needs a retract CD function


M

Metspitzer

I have had 3rd party software do this. It would be nice if it was
included.
 
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E

Ed Cryer

I have had 3rd party software do this. It would be nice if it was
included.
Yes. I think most OEM machines come with one installed these days.
My Acer one does. I can open and close the tray with Ctrl+F11
(programmable) or click on the icon in the Systray.

Win7 only allows Eject.

Ed
 
B

Bob Henson

I have had 3rd party software do this. It would be nice if it was
included.
Agreed. Many desktops these days don't have an accessible "close" button
at all, it's hidden by the trendy case design on my HP box. However, why
don't I think a common sense idea like that would ever appeal to Microsoft?
 
R

Rob

Agreed. Many desktops these days don't have an accessible "close" button
at all, it's hidden by the trendy case design on my HP box. However, why
don't I think a common sense idea like that would ever appeal to Microsoft?
Copying Macs, perhaps. Try ejecting an installation CD
from some Mac models when the hard drive is corrupted.
After a couple of hours of googling on another machine
(if you have one), you might come accross a key combination
specific to your model which will do it. Painful.
 
C

Char Jackson

Agreed. Many desktops these days don't have an accessible "close" button
at all, it's hidden by the trendy case design on my HP box. However, why
don't I think a common sense idea like that would ever appeal to Microsoft?
OTOH, the entire tray is a giant 'close' button. Give it a gentle
nudge and watch it do its thing.

Besides, if a computer case has a functional 'open' button it seems
redundant to say it must have a functional 'close' button, since it's
the same button.
 
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C

charlie

OTOH, the entire tray is a giant 'close' button. Give it a gentle
nudge and watch it do its thing.

Besides, if a computer case has a functional 'open' button it seems
redundant to say it must have a functional 'close' button, since it's
the same button.
One (or more) of the old windows & dos schemes hat the eject function
set up to toggle open or closed. Quite a few didn't like this, and there
were occasional problems with the tray closing unexpectedly.

I've never had a problem with closing the tray. On the other hand,
mostly in the past, getting the tray to open was an occasional problem.
(Get out the paper clip, etc.)
 
T

Twayne

In
Bob Henson said:
Agreed. Many desktops these days don't have an accessible
"close" button at all, it's hidden by the trendy case
design on my HP box. However, why don't I think a common
sense idea like that would ever appeal to Microsoft?

Very useful: many features, stable:

Most Popular Freeware on GRC.COM

Wizmo is a multipurpose miscellaneous Windows utility that provides an array
....
https://www.grc.com/freepopular.htm - Cached
 
B

Bob Henson

OTOH, the entire tray is a giant 'close' button. Give it a gentle
nudge and watch it do its thing.

Besides, if a computer case has a functional 'open' button it seems
redundant to say it must have a functional 'close' button, since it's
the same button.
But if the opened drive completely obscures the button when open - as on
some computers including one of mine - you need a close button. In nay
case it's much easier to do it from the keyboard - especially when the
computer is not easily accessible under a desk, say.
 
S

SC Tom

Bob Henson said:
But if the opened drive completely obscures the button when open - as on
some computers including one of mine - you need a close button. In nay
case it's much easier to do it from the keyboard - especially when the
computer is not easily accessible under a desk, say.

--
http://www.galen.org.uk


Alcohol and Calculus don't mix. Never drink and derive.
If you don't have easy access to the button, then give the tray a gentle
push in, like Char posted. That's the way they've been designed for quite
some time now. Moving either one of mine less than a 1/4" triggers the tray
to close.
 
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G

Gene E. Bloch

But it's not. I have just tested both utilities recommended in this
thread on a Windows 7 Ultimate x64 machine, and both work fine. Either
can be easily implemented with a shortcut for one click operation.

NirCmd.exe
http://www.nirsoft.net/utils/nircmd2.html

Wizmo.exe
http://www.nirsoft.net/utils/nircmd2.html
From Bloch's free, no obligation, Typo Crorector Service(TM), here's the
second link:

https://www.grc.com/freepopular.htm

Which I just learned about from Twayne's post (thanks, Twayne).

(Yes, the name of the service is purposely misspelled.)
 
G

Gene E. Bloch

Oops. Thank you. I thought I had pasted the address for the Wizmo page:
https://www.grc.com/wizmo/wizmo.htm
Hey, I said "no obligation" :)

I just figured I'd save you the trouble...

Both of those sites are interesting, or maybe I should say overwhelming.
But when you need a funny little utility, it's great to know about them
- thanks.

Oops - I forgot to bookmark them - gotta go.
 
T

thanatoid

Yes. I think most OEM machines come with one installed
these days. My Acer one does. I can open and close the tray
with Ctrl+F11 (programmable) or click on the icon in the
Systray.

Win7 only allows Eject.
OK, you're an extremely perceptive and intelligent person.

WHAT is so hard about pressing a button on the drive?
I NEVER could understand why some people prefer the rodent for
this simple task.

(Having the computer 20 feet away doesn't count, that's
understandable - although come to think of it [coming to think
of it takes longer and longer, sigh] you STILL have to go over
there to change the disc.)
 
M

Metspitzer

Yes. I think most OEM machines come with one installed
these days. My Acer one does. I can open and close the tray
with Ctrl+F11 (programmable) or click on the icon in the
Systray.

Win7 only allows Eject.
OK, you're an extremely perceptive and intelligent person.

WHAT is so hard about pressing a button on the drive?
I NEVER could understand why some people prefer the rodent for
this simple task.

(Having the computer 20 feet away doesn't count, that's
understandable - although come to think of it [coming to think
of it takes longer and longer, sigh] you STILL have to go over
there to change the disc.)
My computer is sitting on my right side and on the floor. The eject
button is on the right and on the bottom of the DVD. When the door is
open, the tray is blocking the button.

Understand now?
 
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S

Seth

Metspitzer said:
On Wed, 29 Jun 2011 19:27:17 +0000 (UTC), thanatoid

My computer is sitting on my right side and on the floor. The eject
button is on the right and on the bottom of the DVD. When the door is
open, the tray is blocking the button.
And as stated elsewhere in this thread, just nudge the tray and it closes.
 
S

Seth

Thip said:
Which can be difficult if you're older and/or disabled.
So nudging the tray is more difficult than handling the disk itself?
Smacking it with a stump would be easier than manipulating the mouse and
mouse button.
 
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