Things Windows 7 needs included.


Joined
Dec 4, 2009
Messages
111
Reaction score
13
I find myself being frustrated some times. Windows 7 is a great improvement over Vista by all means. But, I am left to wonder why they don't include some of their other products as part of the the whole package. Simple things, that it just kind of makes since for them to of included in the Windows install.

Things like:

Microsoft Security Essentials
http://www.microsoft.com/Security_Essentials/

I know most people have a favorite Anti-Virus software. And most people will just uninstall it and add that instead of the completely FREE software Microsoft offers.

But then why do they include things like Windows Defender, and Windows Firewall? Most people will disable the Windows Defender and install their favorite anti-spyware/malware app's. The same goes for Firewall too.

It makes me feel like I bought something incomplete. When you first install Windows and preform all the updates, and everything it ready to go, then the flag pups up in the task bar with a red circle and a black x. It's like " Wait no, I am ready!" Then you have to look for and and by this or that.

Driver update program

The other thing I would of really have liked to see in Windows 7 is, A drivers update program. After all, properly running drivers is what helps keep your system running properly and it's devices and hardware preforming correctly. It is by far one of my most dreaded things to do on any computer. The device manager I have come to notice over time, doesn't really find out if newer drivers are available all the time.

The process of checking all your device model numbers, the current driver version, endless amounts of time " that I can't help but feel is being wasted" googling for these updates are insane. And any of the third party software I have wasted a good hundred dollars or more trying out, never seem to work correctly. They either detect the incorrect models, or the do not provide me with the latest drivers that are out. It's one big head ache.

In Windows defense, Maybe this should really be more of a manufactures responsibility.

System Recovery Partition

It would be a gift from god if they would include this as a option during the install process. During the install process, having the option to partition a section of the drive to use as a recovery means, instead of using restore disc. Or even better yet, a simple automated windows feature, that once you have updated everything, and installed you favorite must have apps, would do this for you in a few simple easy steps.

These are few of things that to me, that just seem like they should be offered in the install. I have a basic knowledge of software design, and I know that it wouldn't be hard to atleast offer extra's like these during the installation process as simple checkable box's.

Anything you guy's would like to have seen with Windows 7?
 
Ad

Advertisements

clifford_cooley

VIP Member
Joined
Mar 8, 2009
Messages
5,063
Reaction score
1,184
First off anything that can be replaced by a third party software maker should be a separate install. This would open the door to selecting which software you want installed and run less chance for conflicts and bloating.

I will forever more say an OS should be just that an OS. Anything else should be a separate install.
Do you want security? Select the software you want to use for your security.
Do you want anti-virus? Selct the software you want to use for your anti-virus.
etc...
You see my point.

When choosing a third party software, you should never be faced with un-installing a built in feature first. Anything that may need to be uninstalled before installing a third party app should be removed from the OS package.
 
Joined
Dec 1, 2009
Messages
60
Reaction score
8
Great reply Clifford and I agree totally.

I wouldn’t trust a security program that was pre-installed in the OS, as it is I install Norton 360 which disables the MS firewall and MS defender. They are just not good enough.

As far as other preinstalled apps go I think there are still too many and when installing the first thing I do is uninstall MS features, games, tablet, fax, remote access etc. (not to mention all the services that are set to “auto” on fresh install!) I'm sure there are people out there that use them but I’m not one of them and MS should not presume that I am.

The OS should install the bare bone OS only and then maybe, just maybe allow you to select what you want to install via a desktop icon/ webpage short cut with a selection of apps/ settings much the same way Linux does.

The best thing I guess about all the pre-installed apps/ services is the system feels like my own once I finish removing/ disabling all the junk… not much of a payment for the time spent thou.
 
Joined
Dec 4, 2009
Messages
111
Reaction score
13
I guess maybe I worded myself wrong.

It would be nice, if Microsoft included as part of the installing process, a section to allow the end user to have his/her choice of what does and doesn't get installed. I didn't really mean to say, it should just install it. I use most of what come's with windows, and what I don't I uninstall.

I meant more of a setup where you have a option Typical/Advanced. The typical just installs whatever is on the disc, Advanced give you " the end user" the ability to pick and choose what will be installed. With out getting to much into it, I have used OS's that do this, and it is nice to be able to customize the install.
 

clifford_cooley

VIP Member
Joined
Mar 8, 2009
Messages
5,063
Reaction score
1,184
I guess maybe I worded myself wrong.

It would be nice, if Microsoft included as part of the installing process, a section to allow the end user to have his/her choice of what does and doesn't get installed. I didn't really mean to say, it should just install it. I use most of what come's with windows, and what I don't I uninstall.

I meant more of a setup where you have a option Typical/Advanced. The typical just installs whatever is on the disc, Advanced give you " the end user" the ability to pick and choose what will be installed. With out getting to much into it, I have used OS's that do this, and it is nice to be able to customize the install.
I couldn't agree more. I made this very argument myself before. Why not Windows setup, Office has these options. I suppose MS thinks we are smart enough to install Office but not Windows.

I truly believe MS does this as a sales pitch to make more money from all the feature in the OS. Think about it if they didn't bundle everything, who would buy the extras? I know I wouldn't.
 

Veedaz

~
VIP Member
Joined
Sep 1, 2009
Messages
1,988
Reaction score
374
mattweed9 wrote
The other thing I would of really have liked to see in Windows 7 is, A drivers update program
I have yet to see any driver updating program get it right (eg) updating drivers for ATI Radeon HD 4830.... ATI drivers cant be overwritten the old drivers & CCC need to be uninstalled first, miss match CCC with drivers will cause problems and programs like Driver Doctor, Driver Robot etc tend to just download the drivers. Many times i have had Computers in for repair because of driver update programs ... some wont even boot up.
 
Ad

Advertisements

davehc

VIP Member
Joined
Jul 20, 2009
Messages
1,958
Reaction score
502
"I find myself being frustrated some times. Windows 7 is a great improvement over Vista by all means. But, I am left to wonder why they don't include some of their other products as part of the the whole package. "

I think one of the reasons which has led to this practice, is the incessant barrage of so-called, monopoly infringements Microsoft get, most particularly from the European Union. I am convinced that there is, in the European "government", a body of members who have been given Macs with free support (LOL). But not to exclude mini dictators in some of the US states - remember the recent controversy over MSOffice?
As far as anti malware prevention was concerned. One of the major complaints, through Win98 to Vista, was the lack of 100% security, a state inpossible to achieve. Every hacker in the world regards MS as an essential part of their curriculum - it is a challenge. Never say die. Microsft loaded Vista up with so much protection, much inherited by Windows 7, that, again, the complaints poured in about unuseability.

"then the flag pups up in the task bar with a red circle and a black x."

Not clear on that one - I havn't experienced it?"

"The other thing I would of really have liked to see in Windows 7 is, A drivers update program. After all, properly running drivers is what helps keep your system running properly and it's devices and hardware preforming correctly. It is by far one of my most dreaded things to do on any computer. The device manager I have come to notice over time, doesn't really find out if newer drivers are available all the time"

Microsoft keep a Dbase of hardware drivers. This incorporates the latest drivers received from the manufacturers. It is the responsibility of those manufacturers to keep Microsoft up to date with tested and fully functional material. On receipt of new material, the process offers these to the users via the normal Windows update procedure. I acknowledge that it is easy for Microsoft to get off the hook by blaming the manufacturers but, at the same time, it would be an astronomical task for them to test each and every item on arrival. I have personally found that going to the sites for the latest driver updates can lead into just as many headaches. Effectively, I would say there is, in fact, an update prgram. There is also the benefit of two options. Examine the update before installing or, if doubtful, there is also the other option to not allow driver updates.

"During the install process, having the option to partition a section of the drive to use as a recovery means, instead of using restore disc. Or even better yet, a simple automated windows feature, that once you have updated everything, and installed you favorite must have apps, would do this for you in a few simple easy steps."

I cannot help feeling that the very average user would become totally confused with such an option at the start of the install. There is already confusion, as you can read on help forums, with the existing system of partitioning. But what I would concede is that, as an alternative to the existing backup system, Microsoft could, within the OS, offer a decent imaging program. But, going back, maybe they would once again be attacked over monopoly rights!

Having waffled away with all that, what I would like to see is, when one finally arrives at the desktop, is a popup or similar, listing links to all their own free software, such as Windows live :MSE etc.... Surely that would not offend European, or any other, law.
 
Joined
Dec 4, 2009
Messages
111
Reaction score
13
The "white flag" is the Action Center. Once you have installed the OS, it reports things that you need to do for your computer. Updates, Anti Virus, Firewall,, and so on.

I never thought of it from the Monopoly view. The only reason I made this thread is, I installed a extra drive I had on a friends tower, his failed. I had forgotten how much of a pain it can be to install a new OS on a computer you are not familiar with. He has little to no technical knowledge, which left me finding out all his drivers for him, locating all the new drivers and installing them, helping him find a decent free anti virus program, then removing things he " doesn't like" like IE.

By the time I got home I was more then a little frustrated. But he's a good friend and it was worth it in the long run. He was happy as could be hours later once all was well.

Next time, god forbid, I'll just set up the hard drive and install Windows and send him here lol.
 

Kougar

OCing one chip at a time
VIP Member
Joined
May 11, 2009
Messages
588
Reaction score
116
On one hand I do agree with you... many people would be better off if MSE was included out of the box instead of Windows Defender.

The problem is Microsoft would be fined and forced to remove MSE because security vendors would complain Microsoft was unfairly exploiting their monopoly. Given the EU's past legal history it would be almost guaranteed to happen. The Security Venders were up in arms just because Vista had a protected kernel that they weren't allowed to plug their driver hooks into, and Microsoft was forced to open the kernel for them.

In regards to a driver update program, they have already done this to some degree. You will find common hardware drivers listed under Windows Update... and those are routinely updated. The only issue is Windows Update tends to lag behind and not carry the most recent driver updates, so there is definitely room for improvement there. And they don't have a driver for everything...

For the average user a system recovery partition might be helpful, but not everyone would want one either. Also keep in mind that it is safer to keep system images, backup files, and any other form of backups on a completely separate hard drive. All hard drives wear out eventually and (I believe) this is still one of the main causes for data loss.
 
Ad

Advertisements

catilley1092

Win 7/Linux Mint Lover
VIP Member
Joined
Nov 13, 2009
Messages
3,507
Reaction score
563
There is a factory image that you can revert to if necessary. At least it is with HP. If the system restore function won't help you, you can start over fresh, provided you made a Emergency Repair Disc. Also, it's the PC companies that throws in all the bloatware (trial antivirus and other junk). I have to agree with Kougar on the MSE deal, Microsoft would get their pants sued off. You can disable Windows Defender, as I did. No package that comes with any OS will please everyone. And too, I don't feel that MSE has been on the market long enough to place on a flagship OS such as Windows 7. I'm using Avast & Ad Aware. However, I'm giving MSE a fair chance on my XP laptops. It performs well so far. Like you, I didn't get all that I wanted either, but you can always customize your own system. That gives you time to get acquainted with it, don't you think?
 

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top