New Intel Build advice


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Ok I have plans on building a new Intel system in the next few months and since I have been out of the loop on what is what as far as chipsets and sockets I have a few questions.

I orginally thought the Z68 platform was where I wanted to be then I figured I better go with the Z77 platform for a little future proofing then looking around I see the X79 chipset so I am needing some advice.

My current system is listed in my profile and when I built it 5 years and I have had some otherboard problems which seems to be only a dead PCIe slot at this time so I cannot run my SLI setup. I am looking to just upgrade core components at this time (mb, cpu, and ram) to eliminate the motherboard problem and will upgrade other components later.

I originally wanted to go with an EVGA motherboard but reading about too many issues with their boards since the Z68 lineup so I will be looking at ASUS boards. Should I go with the 2011 socket? I am looking at a quad core cpu maybe the i7 3770k and this could be upgraded later so definately want an upgrade path for maybe a 6 core cpu and I like the higher bus lanes on the 2011 socket compared to the 1155. EDIT: just saw the 2011 socket only takes specific cpu's so maybe the 3820 would be the one but not sure about it's ability to be overclocked not being a K cpu.

Cost is a factor but I am open to any suggestions because I do want a rock solid performer that can be overclocked mildly and I do want to have the PCIe 3.0 slots for future video card upgrades. I know the K series cpu's are the ones to get but I am also seeing a 3770s version of this cpu which just looks to operate at a lower wattage and since I have not been keeping up with this tech lately I don't know what is newest and what has been improved upon.

As far as overclocking...I haven't messed with it much since mine does not oc very well but I want the option to do it and I won't be oc'ing any crazy amounts. I do run a lot of the latest games so this will be a gaming machine.

Thanks in advance!
 
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Digerati

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EDIT: just saw the 2011 socket only takes specific cpu's
Every socket, not just the 2011, only takes specific CPUs. And on top of that, the chipset determines which CPU it supports too. So not only must the CPU physically fit the socket, it must also be compatible with that specific board.

For that reason, all the board makers maintain QVLs (qualified vendors lists) of compatible CPUs and RAM for each board they make on the board's website. You MUST buy a listed CPU to ensure compatibility. However, there are too many RAM makers and models for board makers to test them all. So you can buy unlisted RAM, but it MUST have the same specifications as listed RAM.

I too like ASUS, but most of my builds are with Gigabyte boards.

I usually decide which class of CPU I want to use first, then buy a board that has the features I want, then select a specific CPU supported by that board.

I am looking to just upgrade core components at this time (mb, cpu, and ram)
That's fine, but, or three buts really. (1) You MUST ensure your current power supply is capable of supporting the new hardware. (2) You MUST ensure your case is capable of supplying sufficient cool air flow through the case for the new hardware. (3) Only a "boxed" full-retail Windows license is legally transferable to a new motherboard. It is illegal to use an OEM/System Builders license that came with or was purchased for one computer on another computer. A disk “branded” with a computer maker’s brand name, or is labeled with “OEM", "OEM/System Builder”, “Upgrade”, “Academic Edition”, or "For Distribution with a new PC only", is not transferable to a new PC (or upgraded motherboard) under any circumstances. These OEM licenses are inextricably tied to the "original equipment". And most importantly, as users, we agreed to the terms of the end-user licensing agreement (EULA) when we decided to continue to use the software on the original computer. And that makes it legally binding.

With that in mind, if you need to buy a new license I recommend 64-bit Windows 7 or Windows 8, or one of the many free Linux alternatives.
 

Kougar

OCing one chip at a time
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Hey Edillee.

I'll make it simple for ya. If you want six cores, you must go with X79 boards. That's the only socket that has them.

It doesn't matter if you buy Z77 or not, Haswell processors will launch in 5 months and will not be compatible with ANY current sockets. So there is no point in paying more for "future proofing" right now, just go with what ya need right now. Also, since you wish to overclock, you will need to buy a K-series CPU in order to do so.
 

Digerati

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Another trend coming down the line is non-replaceable CPUs on PC motherboards. Soldered CPUs are already common in notebooks, tablets, hand-helds, and on some SFF (small form factor) PC motherboards. To reduce costs further, ball grid array (BGA) CPUs will soon be the norm. BGA is a surface mount technology - where the CPU is directly mounted (soldered) to the motherboard, instead of being installed in a socket.

This means almost certain doom for users wishing to pick, or upgrade their CPUs and represents another nail in the coffin of PCs.
 

yodap

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Another trend coming down the line is non-replaceable CPUs on PC motherboards. Soldered CPUs are already common in notebooks, tablets, hand-helds, and on some SFF (small form factor) PC motherboards. To reduce costs further, ball grid array (BGA) CPUs will soon be the norm. BGA is a surface mount technology - where the CPU is directly mounted (soldered) to the motherboard, instead of being installed in a socket.

This means almost certain doom for users wishing to pick, or upgrade their CPUs and represents another nail in the coffin of PCs.
I think Kougar would agree that that would really suck for the DC world and gamers and enthusiests.
 
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Digerati

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It sure would suck but the facts are, PC sales are falling rapidly as more and more users are moving to smaller formats.

Dell and HP sales are tanking and that affects aftermarket accessories sales too. :(

Even big industries are moving away from PCs and towards tablets.
 

clifford_cooley

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I know its inevitable but that doesn't change the disappointment factor that many people feel as the tides roll in.
 
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Digerati

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No doubt. While I am semi-retired and not dependent on income from my business, a large part of my business is building custom PCs. And business has dropped in that area (though some is blamed on reluctance to move to W8).
 

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