How to Set Up Windows 7 Homegroups


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B

Big Steel

How to Set Up Windows 7 Homegroups for Seamless, Instant Sharing
Between PCs In Your Home

http://lifehacker.com/5883517/how-to-set-up-windows-7-homegroups-for-seamless-instant-sharing-between-pcs-in-your-home

I am posting the link just in case it works. I tried to network a
Win7 drive in the past and just ended up just dumping and copying
everything from an XP drive.

I don't work for the CIA. I hope this works somewhat like XP does.
It's pretty simple between Windows 7 machines. If you have personal
firewall make sure you have File and Print Sharing enabled on the
firewalls.
 
M

Metspitzer

It's pretty simple between Windows 7 machines. If you have personal
firewall make sure you have File and Print Sharing enabled on the
firewalls.
I gave up on trying to get a Win7 machine to share a folder that the
XP machine could see many months ago. I will give this web page a
shot next time I feel the need to do so.

I didn't see what was wrong with allowing users to set up like XP did.
 
C

Char Jackson

I gave up on trying to get a Win7 machine to share a folder that the
XP machine could see many months ago. I will give this web page a
shot next time I feel the need to do so.
Gave up why? What problems did you have? I have a mixed network here
and didn't have any problems sharing in either direction.
I didn't see what was wrong with allowing users to set up like XP did.
Why not do it that way?
 
B

Big Steel

I gave up on trying to get a Win7 machine to share a folder that the
XP machine could see many months ago. I will give this web page a
shot next time I feel the need to do so.

I didn't see what was wrong with allowing users to set up like XP did.
I could never get a Win 7 machine and a Vista machine to share either. I
think the Win 7 machine could see the Vista folder share but Vista could
wouldn't see Win 7. I gave up on that, but Win 7 to Win 7 like I have
now is no problem.
 
N

Nil

Gave up why? What problems did you have? I have a mixed network
here and didn't have any problems sharing in either direction.
Me, either. I've got XP, Vista and Win7 computers on my home network,
and they can all see and share each others resources, no problem.
 
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Z

z

Me, either. I've got XP, Vista and Win7 computers on my home network,
and they can all see and share each others resources, no problem.
Do you have 32 or 64 Bit versions of Win7? I have 64 bit and can't see
any other devices on my network (I only have 1 win7 machine).

Apparently the 32 bit versions don't have a problem seeing xp, vista,
etc.

I have heard that win7 is very good at networking to win7 machines, but
not much else. Typical Micro$oft rubbish.
 
A

Allen Drake

Do you have 32 or 64 Bit versions of Win7? I have 64 bit and can't see
any other devices on my network (I only have 1 win7 machine).

Apparently the 32 bit versions don't have a problem seeing xp, vista,
etc.

I have heard that win7 is very good at networking to win7 machines, but
not much else. Typical Micro$oft rubbish.
I have several Win7 boxes and all share with XP no problem here. You
must be logged on as Admin on W7 systems.
 
Z

z

I have several Win7 boxes and all share with XP no problem here. You
must be logged on as Admin on W7 systems.
I am logged on as admin. I have spent over 4 hours trying to get the
network going, and have given up on it. In xp I can do it in a minute.
 
J

John Williamson

z said:
I am logged on as admin. I have spent over 4 hours trying to get the
network going, and have given up on it. In xp I can do it in a minute.
The trick is to install the Link Layer Topology Discovery responder on
XP, or XP machines won't be visible to later versions. It either needs
to be installed before XP SP3 or you need to do the installation
manually by extracting the files from the installer package you download
from M$ and copying them to the right place. Go to:-

http://www.microsoft.com/download/en/details.aspx?displaylang=en&id=5577

To obtain the installer. With XP SP3, the LLTD responder is erroneously
tagged as already being present when you use the installer from M$.
 
M

Metspitzer

Do you have 32 or 64 Bit versions of Win7? I have 64 bit and can't see
any other devices on my network (I only have 1 win7 machine).

Apparently the 32 bit versions don't have a problem seeing xp, vista,
etc.

I have heard that win7 is very good at networking to win7 machines, but
not much else. Typical Micro$oft rubbish.
I have the 64 version.
 
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P

Paul

John said:
z wrote:

The trick is to install the Link Layer Topology Discovery responder on
XP, or XP machines won't be visible to later versions. It either needs
to be installed before XP SP3 or you need to do the installation
manually by extracting the files from the installer package you download
from M$ and copying them to the right place. Go to:-

http://www.microsoft.com/download/en/details.aspx?displaylang=en&id=5577

To obtain the installer. With XP SP3, the LLTD responder is erroneously
tagged as already being present when you use the installer from M$.
Some background on it, here.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Link_Layer_Topology_Discovery

On a Linux box, I sometimes use a "connection via IP address",
to avoid any discovery issues. Which might be another way to
solve it, in an emergency situation (get files, then hurry off
somewhere). To get the necessary info there, I visit the lease
page on my router box and there I can see the various machines
and their DHCP lease.

Paul
 
C

Char Jackson

Do you have 32 or 64 Bit versions of Win7? I have 64 bit and can't see
any other devices on my network (I only have 1 win7 machine).
It has nothing to do with being 64-bit. I'm guessing you're trying to
use the new Homegroups feature of Win 7? That won't work.
Apparently the 32 bit versions don't have a problem seeing xp, vista,
etc.
32 and 64 are the same in this regard. Both easily network with other
Ethernet devices, including previous versions of Windows, media
players, etc.
I have heard that win7 is very good at networking to win7 machines, but
not much else.
I have heard a lot of things. Most aren't true.
Typical Micro$oft rubbish.
If rubbish means made up, then I agree.
 
C

Char Jackson

I have several Win7 boxes and all share with XP no problem here. You
must be logged on as Admin on W7 systems.
I'm not sure what "You must be logged on as Admin" means, but for
about 99% of any typical day there is no one at all logged onto my
media server and sharing works fine.
 
C

Char Jackson

I am logged on as admin. I have spent over 4 hours trying to get the
network going, and have given up on it. In xp I can do it in a minute.
It should take you the same minute with Win 7. What problem did you
run into?
 
C

Char Jackson

The trick is to install the Link Layer Topology Discovery responder on
XP, or XP machines won't be visible to later versions. It either needs
to be installed before XP SP3 or you need to do the installation
manually by extracting the files from the installer package you download
from M$ and copying them to the right place.
I didn't need to find and install that, nor anything else, to enable
sharing between Win 7 and XP systems. I already had an XP network with
multiple shared folders, so when I added a few Win 7 systems I merely
shared their folders, as well. No problems so far, but it's only been
a bit over a year so something could still crop up.
 
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G

Gordon

I gave up on trying to get a Win7 machine to share a folder that the
XP machine could see many months ago. I will give this web page a
shot next time I feel the need to do so.

I didn't see what was wrong with allowing users to set up like XP did.
Homegroups will only work between Windows 7 machines and then it's very
flakey.
If you have a non-Windows 7 machine in the network then you cannot use
Homegroups - you HAVE to use the good old tried and tested Workgroup....
 
M

mechanic

Homegroups will only work between Windows 7 machines and then it's
very flakey. If you have a non-Windows 7 machine in the network
then you cannot use Homegroups - you HAVE to use the good old
tried and tested Workgroup....
Sounds like someone here actually has a clue...
 
N

Nil

Do you have 32 or 64 Bit versions of Win7? I have 64 bit and
can't see any other devices on my network (I only have 1 win7
machine).

Apparently the 32 bit versions don't have a problem seeing xp,
vista, etc.
I have only 32-bit Windows in the house. No 64-bit versions. But I
don't believe that has anything to do with it.
I have heard that win7 is very good at networking to win7
machines, but not much else.
I bet you have Windows 7 Homegroups enabled. That networking system
only works with other Windows 7 computers. In order to network with
Vista and earlier computers, you must use the traditional Workgroup
and file sharing method. I believe there's some workarounds that can
let you use Homegroups, but I haven't tried them. I just turned off
Homegroups and everything worked as I was used to.

Here's an MS white paper describing how to network the various
operating systems:

http://www.microsoft.com/download/en/details.aspx?displaylang=en&id=17168
Typical Micro$oft rubbish.
Typical blame-$omeone-el$e-for-their-own-ignorance rubbish. Try
taking some responsibility and doing some research. The tools are
all there. If you're unwilling to learn to use then, it's your own
fault.
 
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N

Nil

I have several Win7 boxes and all share with XP no problem here.
You must be logged on as Admin on W7 systems.
No, that's not true. I can connect to all network resources even if
I'm logged in as a regular user.
 

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