can use Vista drivers in Win7?


T

Timothy Daniels

My Dell XPS M1330 laptop came with 32-bit Vista installed.
I now find that Dell "supports" 64-bit Vista for that computer.
Since I would like to increase the RAM size from 3GB to
4GB or 8GB, I'd like to run 64-bit Windows 7 in order to be
able to access all the extra RAM. But the problem is drivers.
Dell's website has downloadable drivers for 64-bit Vista, but
not for 64-bit Windows 7.

Can 64-bit drivers written for Vista be used with Windows 7?

*TimDaniels*
 
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W

...winston

Sometimes they work, other times they don't.
- driver files may verify an o/s version. In some cases where they were developed prior to a later o/s the code may only be looking
for the o/s (and version) for which it was developed. In some cases, a driver (if an exe file) can be run in compatibility mode.

You might wish to investigate what changed (hardware, bios, chipset, chipset driver) that allows a 32-bit only model to later
support 64-bit (prior to wiping a 32-bit o/s)
--
....winston
msft mvp mail


"Timothy Daniels" wrote in message
My Dell XPS M1330 laptop came with 32-bit Vista installed.
I now find that Dell "supports" 64-bit Vista for that computer.
Since I would like to increase the RAM size from 3GB to
4GB or 8GB, I'd like to run 64-bit Windows 7 in order to be
able to access all the extra RAM. But the problem is drivers.
Dell's website has downloadable drivers for 64-bit Vista, but
not for 64-bit Windows 7.

Can 64-bit drivers written for Vista be used with Windows 7?

*TimDaniels*
 
T

Timothy Daniels

Although I ordered my XPS M1330 with 32-bit Vista, it appears that
I could have ordered it with 64-bit Vista. So it apparently can handle
a 64-bit OS - which I would prefer to be Win7 instead of Vista. IOW,
nothing changed in the hardware, but getting the proper drivers may
be another matter.

*TimDaniels*
 
W

...winston

Thanks..understood, much appreciated clearing things up for me.

The only route may be to try it (Win7 64bit)
If going from Vista 32b to Win7 64b it would be a clean install (no upgrade path is available)
Probably a good idea to have full Vista32b image (created and tested for restoration) in advance if Murphy shows up.



--
....winston
msft mvp mail


"Timothy Daniels" wrote in message
Although I ordered my XPS M1330 with 32-bit Vista, it appears that
I could have ordered it with 64-bit Vista. So it apparently can handle
a 64-bit OS - which I would prefer to be Win7 instead of Vista. IOW,
nothing changed in the hardware, but getting the proper drivers may
be another matter.

*TimDaniels*
 
T

tigger

Timothy Daniels writted thus:
My Dell XPS M1330 laptop came with 32-bit Vista installed.
I now find that Dell "supports" 64-bit Vista for that computer.
Since I would like to increase the RAM size from 3GB to 4GB or 8GB, I'd
like to run 64-bit Windows 7 in order to be able to access all the extra
RAM. But the problem is drivers. Dell's website has downloadable
drivers for 64-bit Vista, but not for 64-bit Windows 7.

Can 64-bit drivers written for Vista be used with Windows 7?

*TimDaniels*
Similar problem with my Toshiba, but all the Vista64 drivers worked for
Win764 (eventually) all bar the integrated Webcam which still doesn't
work properly other than with 64bit Linux...
 
C

charlie

My Dell XPS M1330 laptop came with 32-bit Vista installed.
I now find that Dell "supports" 64-bit Vista for that computer.
Since I would like to increase the RAM size from 3GB to
4GB or 8GB, I'd like to run 64-bit Windows 7 in order to be
able to access all the extra RAM. But the problem is drivers.
Dell's website has downloadable drivers for 64-bit Vista, but
not for 64-bit Windows 7.

Can 64-bit drivers written for Vista be used with Windows 7?

*TimDaniels*
You may be able to download the dell 64bit drivers from dell.
 
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T

Timothy Daniels

charlie said:
You may be able to download the dell 64bit drivers from dell.
Yes, and that would be an extensive search because what
Dell has for the XPS M1330 is what it "supports" - drivers for
Vista 32- and 64-bit and Win7 32-bit. To find 64-bit Win7
drivers for the same hardware, I'd have to determine what
more recent laptop PCs had the same hardware. And Dell
Tech Reps haven't a clue nor the inclination to search for me.
IOW, it would become a hobby rather than a straightforward
business project.

So do drivers written for 64-bit Vista signal the OS the same
way as drivers written for 64-bit Win7?

*TimDaniels*
 
C

charlie

Yes, and that would be an extensive search because what
Dell has for the XPS M1330 is what it "supports" - drivers for
Vista 32- and 64-bit and Win7 32-bit. To find 64-bit Win7
drivers for the same hardware, I'd have to determine what
more recent laptop PCs had the same hardware. And Dell
Tech Reps haven't a clue nor the inclination to search for me.
IOW, it would become a hobby rather than a straightforward
business project.

So do drivers written for 64-bit Vista signal the OS the same
way as drivers written for 64-bit Win7?

*TimDaniels*
Well, I'd then obtain the vista 32 drivers, "inspect them", looking for
clues as to what they do, and see if generic OEM win 7 32 drivers will work.
The most troublesome drivers seem to be those that are for things like
odd video circuitry, or perhaps multimedia hardware. Next are sound
drivers and odd ball modem implementations.

I have an older (2007 vintage) HP multimedia laptop that runs Vista.
The drivers for the LCD display were originally HP specific, then Nvidia
released generic drivers that work fine in win 7. The TV card is a re
branded Haupage card. I don't have a clue as to a generic Modem driver,
simply because I haven't used it in years. Originally, I had so much
grief with the HP Vista version that I installed an MS complimentary
ultimate version given to me at a Vista intro event. I'd just scrap the
laptop and start over, but I don't use a laptop often enough to make it
worth the expense.

One of these days, when I run out of other things to do (fat chance) I'm
liable to pull the two hard drives, replace one with an SSD drive, and
the other with a larger HD, and re-do the whole thing.
 
T

Timothy Daniels

"charlie" continued:
Well, I'd then obtain the vista 32 drivers, "inspect them", looking for
clues as to what they do, and see if generic OEM win 7 32 drivers will work.
The most troublesome drivers seem to be those that are for things like
odd video circuitry, or perhaps multimedia hardware. Next are sound
drivers and odd ball modem implementations.

I think you've lost track of the thread: I'm asking if Vista 64-bit drivers
might be used for a Win7 64-bit OS. Dell stopped supporting my laptop
when Vista was the latest hurrah, and their latest 64-bit drivers for my
laptop are for 64-bit Vista, while I have a 64-bit Win7 Pro installation DVD
ready to go. So I'm wondering if I could use the 64-bit Vista drivers with
my 64-bit Win7 Pro.

*TimDaniels*
 
W

...winston

"Timothy Daniels" wrote in message I think you've lost track of the thread: I'm asking if Vista 64-bit drivers
might be used for a Win7 64-bit OS. Dell stopped supporting my laptop
when Vista was the latest hurrah, and their latest 64-bit drivers for my
laptop are for 64-bit Vista, while I have a 64-bit Win7 Pro installation DVD
ready to go. So I'm wondering if I could use the 64-bit Vista drivers with
my 64-bit Win7 Pro.
Tim,
The only response that can completely answer your question is if someone with your identical system shows up (which apparently has
yet to happen) and states that they have successfully installed the 64 bit version of Win7 Pro and successfully used/installed the
64-bit Vista drivers.

Until that happens, the only answer is maybe or maybe not.

Your best bet at this stage if you'd like to pursue replacing 32bit Vista with 64bit Win7 Pro is to do the following:
1. Image your entire drive to external media to ensure you have the ability to return to Vista 32-bit
- it would be prudent to test the image restoration to ensure it works
2. Download as many Win7 Pro 64-bit drivers from the device manufacturer sites (e.g. If your laptop has a Realtek Audio or Gigabit
Networking Lan and Wifi adapter - go to their site and download the Win7 Pro 64 bit drivers)
3. Repeat step 2 and download all available Vista 64 bit Vista drivers from the Dell site and from any device manufacturer site
4. Download the Win7 Upgrade Advisor and run it
- Heed any warnings about compatibility of hardware and software
- if the Advisor provides sufficient information that warrants you may achieve success then and only then proceed with Win7 64 bit
install and continue to step 5 (if the Advisor does not provide a satisfactory comfort zone to your liking.... do not go further)
5. Install Win7 Pro 64-bit (since one can not upgrade from a 32 to 64 bit, the the Win7 Pro 64-bit must be a clean install - wiping
the drive, then install the o/s and software in entirety)
- if your system hardware does not meet Win7 Pro 64 bit specs, the installation will likely fail
6. Hope Win7 Pro 64-bit provides drivers during install, or later via Windows Updates.
7. Any devices that still need drivers then attempt to install the drivers you downloaded in Step 2 and 3.
8. If not successful, restore your Vista 32 bit image. If successful, reimage Win7 Pro to an external driver and proceed to
install the balance of your software.

Fyi...the most likely area for driver problems will be
- Sound, Video, Networking (Lan/Wifi), and Printers
 
T

Timothy Daniels

...winston said:
"Timothy Daniels" wrote:
I think you've lost track of the thread: I'm asking if Vista 64-bit drivers
might be used for a Win7 64-bit OS. Dell stopped supporting my laptop
when Vista was the latest hurrah, and their latest 64-bit drivers for my
laptop are for 64-bit Vista, while I have a 64-bit Win7 Pro installation DVD
ready to go. So I'm wondering if I could use the 64-bit Vista drivers with
my 64-bit Win7 Pro.

Tim,
The only response that can completely answer your question is if someone
with your identical system shows up (which apparently has yet to happen)
and states that they have successfully installed the 64 bit version of Win7 Pro
and successfully used/installed the 64-bit Vista drivers.

Until that happens, the only answer is maybe or maybe not.

Your best bet at this stage if you'd like to pursue replacing 32bit Vista with 64bit Win7 Pro is
to do the following:
1. Image your entire drive to external media to ensure you have the ability to return to Vista
32-bit
- it would be prudent to test the image restoration to ensure it works
2. Download as many Win7 Pro 64-bit drivers from the device manufacturer sites (e.g. If your
laptop has a Realtek Audio or Gigabit Networking Lan and Wifi adapter - go to their site and
download the Win7 Pro 64 bit drivers)
3. Repeat step 2 and download all available Vista 64 bit Vista drivers from the Dell site and from
any device manufacturer site
4. Download the Win7 Upgrade Advisor and run it
- Heed any warnings about compatibility of hardware and software
- if the Advisor provides sufficient information that warrants you may achieve success then and
only then proceed with Win7 64 bit install and continue to step 5 (if the Advisor does not
provide a satisfactory comfort zone to your liking.... do not go further)
5. Install Win7 Pro 64-bit (since one can not upgrade from a 32 to 64 bit, the the Win7 Pro 64-bit
must be a clean install - wiping the drive, then install the o/s and software in entirety)
- if your system hardware does not meet Win7 Pro 64 bit specs, the installation will likely fail
6. Hope Win7 Pro 64-bit provides drivers during install, or later via Windows Updates.
7. Any devices that still need drivers then attempt to install the drivers you downloaded in Step
2 and 3.
8. If not successful, restore your Vista 32 bit image. If successful, reimage Win7 Pro to an
external driver and proceed to install the balance of your software.

Fyi...the most likely area for driver problems will be
- Sound, Video, Networking (Lan/Wifi), and Printers

Nice summary! I'll follow the steps that you've listed. Thanks!
And thanks for continuing to help on Usenet.

*TimDaniels*
 
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W

...winston

Good luck. No guarantees and proceed at your own risk.
- see Step 1 prior to proceeding.



--
....winston
msft mvp mail


"Timothy Daniels" wrote in message
...winston said:
"Timothy Daniels" wrote:
I think you've lost track of the thread: I'm asking if Vista 64-bit drivers
might be used for a Win7 64-bit OS. Dell stopped supporting my laptop
when Vista was the latest hurrah, and their latest 64-bit drivers for my
laptop are for 64-bit Vista, while I have a 64-bit Win7 Pro installation DVD
ready to go. So I'm wondering if I could use the 64-bit Vista drivers with
my 64-bit Win7 Pro.

Tim,
The only response that can completely answer your question is if someone
with your identical system shows up (which apparently has yet to happen)
and states that they have successfully installed the 64 bit version of Win7 Pro
and successfully used/installed the 64-bit Vista drivers.

Until that happens, the only answer is maybe or maybe not.

Your best bet at this stage if you'd like to pursue replacing 32bit Vista with 64bit Win7 Pro is to do the following:
1. Image your entire drive to external media to ensure you have the ability to return to Vista 32-bit
- it would be prudent to test the image restoration to ensure it works
2. Download as many Win7 Pro 64-bit drivers from the device manufacturer sites (e.g. If your laptop has a Realtek Audio or
Gigabit Networking Lan and Wifi adapter - go to their site and download the Win7 Pro 64 bit drivers)
3. Repeat step 2 and download all available Vista 64 bit Vista drivers from the Dell site and from any device manufacturer site
4. Download the Win7 Upgrade Advisor and run it
- Heed any warnings about compatibility of hardware and software
- if the Advisor provides sufficient information that warrants you may achieve success then and only then proceed with Win7 64
bit install and continue to step 5 (if the Advisor does not provide a satisfactory comfort zone to your liking.... do not go
further)
5. Install Win7 Pro 64-bit (since one can not upgrade from a 32 to 64 bit, the the Win7 Pro 64-bit must be a clean install -
wiping the drive, then install the o/s and software in entirety)
- if your system hardware does not meet Win7 Pro 64 bit specs, the installation will likely fail
6. Hope Win7 Pro 64-bit provides drivers during install, or later via Windows Updates.
7. Any devices that still need drivers then attempt to install the drivers you downloaded in Step 2 and 3.
8. If not successful, restore your Vista 32 bit image. If successful, reimage Win7 Pro to an external driver and proceed to
install the balance of your software.

Fyi...the most likely area for driver problems will be
- Sound, Video, Networking (Lan/Wifi), and Printers

Nice summary! I'll follow the steps that you've listed. Thanks!
And thanks for continuing to help on Usenet.

*TimDaniels*
 
J

Joe Morris

Timothy Daniels" said:
I think you've lost track of the thread: I'm asking if Vista 64-bit
drivers
might be used for a Win7 64-bit OS. Dell stopped supporting my laptop
when Vista was the latest hurrah, and their latest 64-bit drivers for my
laptop are for 64-bit Vista, while I have a 64-bit Win7 Pro installation
DVD
ready to go. So I'm wondering if I could use the 64-bit Vista drivers
with
my 64-bit Win7 Pro.
I can't offer any guarantees but I ran into that while designing the Windows
7 configuration for my POE after getting the RTM distribution but prior to
its retail release. (As with Windows 8, enterprise SA customers, as well as
MSDN and Technet subscribers, had early access to the RTM bits.)

At that time my testbed machine was a Dell D830, for which Dell had released
32-bit and 64-bit Vista drivers. There were no plans to release Windows 7
drivers for that platform, so I used the 64-bit Vista drivers with no
problems.

Of course, that doesn't mean that everything will run smoothly. I'm
currently experimenting with Windows 8 Enterprise RTM on a Dell XT3, and
while most of the Windows 7 drivers on Dell's web site work properly the
wireless interface doesn't play nicely with a WPA2 Enterprise access point.
Not really surprisingly, Dell won't say when updated drivers will be
released.

Summary: try the Vista drivers and see what happens...but be prepared (and
able) to go back to your current system if things don't work out. Given the
absurdly low price for rotating disk storage these days, consider buying a
new hard disk for your laptop, swap it with the one currently in the
machine, then build a new system and see what happens. If it works, fine;
if not, it's not much effort to swap the original disk back into the
machine.

Hint: on every Dell laptop I've used you can remove all of the screws that
hold the hard disk in place from the bottom of the machine: the friction of
the mated electrical connectors is more than enough to hold the disk in the
machine, and (with power off!) this makes switching the disks less of a
hassle.

Joe
 
T

Timothy Daniels

Joe Morris said:
I can't offer any guarantees but I ran into that while designing the Windows
7 configuration for my POE after getting the RTM distribution but prior to
its retail release. (As with Windows 8, enterprise SA customers, as well as
MSDN and Technet subscribers, had early access to the RTM bits.)

At that time my testbed machine was a Dell D830, for which Dell had released
32-bit and 64-bit Vista drivers. There were no plans to release Windows 7
drivers for that platform, so I used the 64-bit Vista drivers with no
problems.

Of course, that doesn't mean that everything will run smoothly. I'm
currently experimenting with Windows 8 Enterprise RTM on a Dell XT3, and
while most of the Windows 7 drivers on Dell's web site work properly the
wireless interface doesn't play nicely with a WPA2 Enterprise access point.
Not really surprisingly, Dell won't say when updated drivers will be
released.

Summary: try the Vista drivers and see what happens...but be prepared (and
able) to go back to your current system if things don't work out. Given the
absurdly low price for rotating disk storage these days, consider buying a
new hard disk for your laptop, swap it with the one currently in the
machine, then build a new system and see what happens. If it works, fine;
if not, it's not much effort to swap the original disk back into the machine.

Hint: on every Dell laptop I've used you can remove all of the screws that
hold the hard disk in place from the bottom of the machine: the friction of
the mated electrical connectors is more than enough to hold the disk in the
machine, and (with power off!) this makes switching the disks less of a
hassle.

Joe
Thanks for the info. The new hard drive for the Win7 installation sounds
prudent.

*TimDaniels*
 
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T

Timothy Daniels

Joe Morris said:
I can't offer any guarantees but I ran into that while designing the Windows
7 configuration for my POE after getting the RTM distribution but prior to
its retail release. (As with Windows 8, enterprise SA customers, as well as
MSDN and Technet subscribers, had early access to the RTM bits.)

At that time my testbed machine was a Dell D830, for which Dell had released
32-bit and 64-bit Vista drivers. There were no plans to release Windows 7
drivers for that platform, so I used the 64-bit Vista drivers with no
problems.

Of course, that doesn't mean that everything will run smoothly. I'm
currently experimenting with Windows 8 Enterprise RTM on a Dell XT3, and
while most of the Windows 7 drivers on Dell's web site work properly the
wireless interface doesn't play nicely with a WPA2 Enterprise access point.
Not really surprisingly, Dell won't say when updated drivers will be
released.

Summary: try the Vista drivers and see what happens...but be prepared (and
able) to go back to your current system if things don't work out. Given the
absurdly low price for rotating disk storage these days, consider buying a
new hard disk for your laptop, swap it with the one currently in the
machine, then build a new system and see what happens. If it works, fine;
if not, it's not much effort to swap the original disk back into the
machine.

Hint: on every Dell laptop I've used you can remove all of the screws that
hold the hard disk in place from the bottom of the machine: the friction of
the mated electrical connectors is more than enough to hold the disk in the
machine, and (with power off!) this makes switching the disks less of a
hassle.

Joe

Well, I finally got 'round to it, and I used a Dell OEM 64-bit Win7 Pro
re-installation DVD (from my workstation), and it installed nicely on my
XPS M1330 laptop. The only driver that I recall feeling that I needed was
the nVidia graphics driver, and I downloaded that from the nVidia website.
Everything else was on the Win7 DVD, although I have never used the
fingerprint reader. The driver for the Dell Bluetooth Travel Mouse was
even on the DVD. Whether all those drivers are in the standard Win7 Pro
DVD, I don't know.

As for fitting the SSD, it took some research, as the thickness of the SSD
is 7mm, and the thickness of the replaced HHD is 9mm, and I just could
NOT get the attachment screws to engage the threads on the SSD. I finally
read that the trick is to turn the laptop rightside-up so that the SSD sags
low enough for the screw threads to engage the SSD mounting threads.

*TimDaniels*
 

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