Boot Problem --- Clean install to eSata drive, will not work inside box


G

Guest

I did a clean install to a new hard drive on one
of my machines. I did the install with the drive
connected to an eSata port.

On boot I got a boot menu to chose between Windows 7
and "Earlier Version of Windows".

Once I had fully configured the new installation I
put the new hard drive into the laptop (Dell E6510).

Now it will not boot unless I hook the old hard drive
up to the eSata port and tell it to boot to the eSata
drive, in which case I get the above boot menu and am
able to boot to the now internal drive.

How do I modify the installation of windows 7 to be able
to boot without the old XP drive connected? I tried a
repair install with no luck.

There is no boot.ini. I tried to remove the old install
using bcdedit, but no luck.

Thanks in advance,
ah
 
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P

philo 

I did a clean install to a new hard drive on one
of my machines. I did the install with the drive
connected to an eSata port.

On boot I got a boot menu to chose between Windows 7
and "Earlier Version of Windows".

Once I had fully configured the new installation I
put the new hard drive into the laptop (Dell E6510).

Now it will not boot unless I hook the old hard drive
up to the eSata port and tell it to boot to the eSata
drive, in which case I get the above boot menu and am
able to boot to the now internal drive.

How do I modify the installation of windows 7 to be able
to boot without the old XP drive connected? I tried a
repair install with no luck.

There is no boot.ini. I tried to remove the old install
using bcdedit, but no luck.

Thanks in advance,
ah

Problem is, it put your boot loader on the *old* drive.

Though that is repairable it's a moot point as you cannot install your
OS on a drive in one machine, then put the drive in a 2nd machine and
expect it to work.

What you need to do is put the drive in the machine you are going to use
it on, then perform the installation there.
 
G

Guest

000


philo > Problem is, it put your boot loader on the *old* drive.

philo > Though that is repairable it's a moot point as you cannot
philo > install your OS on a drive in one machine, then put the
philo > drive in a 2nd machine and expect it to work.

philo > What you need to do is put the drive in the machine you are
philo > going to use it on, then perform the installation there.

I did it on the machine I want it to be on.

How do I get a boot loader on the new disk?

When I use the boot loader from the old disk, and boot to the
new one, all my hardware works, I have the correct drivers...

I hope I do not need to install from scratch...

Thanks,
ah
philo > -- https://www.createspace.com/3707686
 
J

Jan Alter

philo said:
Problem is, it put your boot loader on the *old* drive.

Though that is repairable it's a moot point as you cannot install your OS
on a drive in one machine, then put the drive in a 2nd machine and expect
it to work.

What you need to do is put the drive in the machine you are going to use
it on, then perform the installation there.

All true. But besides that (which is a dealbreaker in the first place) when
one installs the OS on a drive connected to a drive on another computer the
OS installs the drivers for the hardware on that machine.

What you might try before you backtrack to a new installation is to
install the preloaded Win7 drive onto the laptop and then start the computer
with a Win7 install disk and go to 'repair'. As the installation loads
choose 'tools' where you should find one that will allow you to fix Win7
when it will not load. If Win7 does load it will look for drivers for the
laptop's hardware. If you don't have the drivers for Win7 handy you can
probably pick them up at the laptop manufacturer's support page.

JA
 
G

Guest

Jan> All true. But besides that (which is a dealbreaker in the first
Jan> place) when one installs the OS on a drive connected to a drive
Jan> on another computer the OS installs the drivers for the
Jan> hardware on that machine.

Jan> What you might try before you backtrack to a new
Jan> installation is to install the preloaded Win7 drive onto the
Jan> laptop and then start the computer with a Win7 install disk and
Jan> go to 'repair'. As the installation loads choose 'tools' where
Jan> you should find one that will allow you to fix Win7 when it
Jan> will not load. If Win7 does load it will look for drivers for
Jan> the laptop's hardware. If you don't have the drivers for Win7
Jan> handy you can probably pick them up at the laptop
Jan> manufacturer's support page.

The installation has the correct drivers. The eSata port was on the
laptop the new SSD now lives in. No yellow flags in the device manager.

I need to fix the bootloader.

I did try a repair install from the Win 7 DVD, but it did not work.

Any other suggestions before I reformat and reinstall?

Thanks,

ah
Jan> JA
 
G

Gene E. Bloch

Jan> All true. But besides that (which is a dealbreaker in the first
Jan> place) when one installs the OS on a drive connected to a drive
Jan> on another computer the OS installs the drivers for the
Jan> hardware on that machine.

Jan> What you might try before you backtrack to a new
Jan> installation is to install the preloaded Win7 drive onto the
Jan> laptop and then start the computer with a Win7 install disk and
Jan> go to 'repair'. As the installation loads choose 'tools' where
Jan> you should find one that will allow you to fix Win7 when it
Jan> will not load. If Win7 does load it will look for drivers for
Jan> the laptop's hardware. If you don't have the drivers for Win7
Jan> handy you can probably pick them up at the laptop
Jan> manufacturer's support page.

The installation has the correct drivers. The eSata port was on the
laptop the new SSD now lives in. No yellow flags in the device manager.

I need to fix the bootloader.

I did try a repair install from the Win 7 DVD, but it did not work.

Any other suggestions before I reformat and reinstall?

Thanks,

ah
Jan> JA
My only suggestion is to follow the suggestions offered above.

I believe you are in denial in this situation.

That said, I might be wrong, unlikely as that might seem (to me).
 
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G

Guest

Jan> All true. But besides that (which is a dealbreaker in the first
Jan> place) when one installs the OS on a drive connected to a drive
Jan> on another computer the OS installs the drivers for the
Jan> hardware on that machine.Jan> What you might try before you backtrack to a new installation
Jan> is to install the preloaded Win7 drive onto the laptop and then
Jan> start the computer with a Win7 install disk and go to
Jan> 'repair'. As the installation loads choose 'tools' where you
Jan> should find one that will allow you to fix Win7 when it will
Jan> not load. If Win7 does load it will look for drivers for the
Jan> laptop's hardware. If you don't have the drivers for Win7 handy
Jan> you can probably pick them up at the laptop manufacturer's
Jan> support page.Jan> JA

Gene> My only suggestion is to follow the suggestions offered above.

Gene> I believe you are in denial in this situation.

Is it that hard to convert an installation to a bootable one?

I do have all the correct drivers, and did build the installation
on the same computer that it is installed on.

It works fine as long as I use the boot loader on the original disk (now
connected via eSata).


Gene> That said, I might be wrong, unlikely as that might seem (to
Gene> me).

Gene> -- Gene E. Bloch (Stumbling Bloch)
 
G

Guest

I fixed it.

The reason the Windows DVD was unable to fix the boot manager
was that the partition was not marked as active.

I used the command prompt and diskpart to mark the partition,
then ran bootrec with a few parameters.

Then the windows DVD was able to create a boot manager on the
drive.

I used the steps on this webpage:

http://heiser.net/posts/3256

This is now a good installation, and the SSD boot time is
wonderful!

Thanks all,
Andrew
 
G

Gene E. Bloch

I fixed it.

The reason the Windows DVD was unable to fix the boot manager
was that the partition was not marked as active.

I used the command prompt and diskpart to mark the partition,
then ran bootrec with a few parameters.

Then the windows DVD was able to create a boot manager on the
drive.

I used the steps on this webpage:

http://heiser.net/posts/3256

This is now a good installation, and the SSD boot time is
wonderful!

Thanks all,
Andrew
Thanks for telling us how you solved it. Besides letting us know that
you did fix it, it teaches us (TINU) something.

I've bookmarked your link, partly because I might face a similar problem
soon. I am thinking of making my Win8 + Win7 machine into a Win8-only
box.

And of course, my judgment on your issue was wrong; it's just as well
you didn't believe me :)
 
R

Rob

philo > Problem is, it put your boot loader on the *old* drive.

philo > Though that is repairable it's a moot point as you cannot
philo > install your OS on a drive in one machine, then put the
philo > drive in a 2nd machine and expect it to work.

philo > What you need to do is put the drive in the machine you are
philo > going to use it on, then perform the installation there.

I did it on the machine I want it to be on.

How do I get a boot loader on the new disk?

When I use the boot loader from the old disk, and boot to the
new one, all my hardware works, I have the correct drivers...

I hope I do not need to install from scratch...

Thanks,
ah
philo > -- https://www.createspace.com/3707686

Thats the way it is designed so do a clean install on your new HDD then
if you need stuff off the old HDD then connect it up via your esata port.
 
G

Guest

Gene> Thanks for telling us how you solved it. Besides letting us
Gene> know that you did fix it, it teaches us (TINU) something.

You all pointed me in the right direction.

Now I am wondering how I could avoid the problem in the first place.
It seemed like a great idea to leave the old disk in the machine and
fully install the new OS independently, having the old boot to fall back
on if it took longer than expected.

Is there a way to do that? Install on a different disk without having
the boot manager stay on the original disk?

Gene> I've bookmarked your link, partly because I might face a
Gene> similar problem soon. I am thinking of making my Win8 + Win7
Gene> machine into a Win8-only box.

Gene> And of course, my judgment on your issue was wrong; it's just
Gene> as well you didn't believe me :)

I must have given the impression that I installed windows on a different
machine. Even I know better than that!

Thanks again,
ah
Gene> -- Gene E. Bloch (Stumbling Bloch)
 
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G

Gene E. Bloch

Gene> Thanks for telling us how you solved it. Besides letting us
Gene> know that you did fix it, it teaches us (TINU) something.

You all pointed me in the right direction.

Now I am wondering how I could avoid the problem in the first place.
It seemed like a great idea to leave the old disk in the machine and
fully install the new OS independently, having the old boot to fall back
on if it took longer than expected.

Is there a way to do that? Install on a different disk without having
the boot manager stay on the original disk?

Gene> I've bookmarked your link, partly because I might face a
Gene> similar problem soon. I am thinking of making my Win8 + Win7
Gene> machine into a Win8-only box.

Gene> And of course, my judgment on your issue was wrong; it's just
Gene> as well you didn't believe me :)

I must have given the impression that I installed windows on a different
machine. Even I know better than that!
??

I installed Win8 as a dual boot on a Win7 machine, yielding two
partitions on one internal drive.

As I gain experience with 8, I am thinking I don't need the Win7 any
more, so I want to do three things:

1. Make it single boot. That's easy; I do it from time to time with
EasyBCD.

2. Kill the Win7 partition and expand the Win8 to fill the drive. Also
easy with EaseUS or other partition software.

3. Continue to be able to boot the system in W8. That's where I get
nervous.

The link you gave seems like a way to get to #3 if it fails initially.
 
P

philo 

philo > Problem is, it put your boot loader on the *old* drive.

philo > Though that is repairable it's a moot point as you cannot
philo > install your OS on a drive in one machine, then put the
philo > drive in a 2nd machine and expect it to work.

philo > What you need to do is put the drive in the machine you are
philo > going to use it on, then perform the installation there.

I did it on the machine I want it to be on.

How do I get a boot loader on the new disk?

When I use the boot loader from the old disk, and boot to the
new one, all my hardware works, I have the correct drivers...

I hope I do not need to install from scratch...

Thanks,
ah
philo > -- https://www.createspace.com/3707686


I think I missed the part where you said you did a "repair install"

At this point, you really need to remove the XP drive and start all over
 
C

Char Jackson

I think I missed the part where you said you did a "repair install"

At this point, you really need to remove the XP drive and start all over
FYI, you should never have to start all over if you're only missing the boot
record. At any rate, he got it figured out.
 
P

philo 

FYI, you should never have to start all over if you're only missing the boot
record. At any rate, he got it figured out.

Glad it was as simple as marking the partition as active
 
G

Guest

philo> Glad it was as simple as marking the partition as active

That was the critical step that allowed a repair install to work (that
too took two steps --- I was encouraged when the error messages changed
after each step).


philo> -- https://www.createspace.com/3707686
 
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G

Gene E. Bloch

??

I installed Win8 as a dual boot on a Win7 machine, yielding two
partitions on one internal drive.

As I gain experience with 8, I am thinking I don't need the Win7 any
more, so I want to do three things:

1. Make it single boot. That's easy; I do it from time to time with
EasyBCD.

2. Kill the Win7 partition and expand the Win8 to fill the drive. Also
easy with EaseUS or other partition software.

3. Continue to be able to boot the system in W8. That's where I get
nervous.

The link you gave seems like a way to get to #3 if it fails initially.
Finally I can follow up:

Today I made my Win7 + Win8 into a Win8 only single-partition
single-boot drive. Easy peasy, no problems.

The installation of Win8 had automatically[1] made the Win8 partition
the boot drive, so once I removed Win7 from the boot list with the help
of EasyBCD, I deleted the Win7 partition and chose Restart. No sweat.
The machine booted to Win8 just like downtown.

Of course, I had made a complete clone of the two-partition drive before
I tried the above (I'm not as dumb as I look).

[1] In other words, it happened without me doing or knowing anything.
 
J

Jan Alter

Gene E. Bloch said:
??

I installed Win8 as a dual boot on a Win7 machine, yielding two
partitions on one internal drive.

As I gain experience with 8, I am thinking I don't need the Win7 any
more, so I want to do three things:

1. Make it single boot. That's easy; I do it from time to time with
EasyBCD.

2. Kill the Win7 partition and expand the Win8 to fill the drive. Also
easy with EaseUS or other partition software.

3. Continue to be able to boot the system in W8. That's where I get
nervous.

The link you gave seems like a way to get to #3 if it fails initially.
Finally I can follow up:

Today I made my Win7 + Win8 into a Win8 only single-partition
single-boot drive. Easy peasy, no problems.

The installation of Win8 had automatically[1] made the Win8 partition
the boot drive, so once I removed Win7 from the boot list with the help
of EasyBCD, I deleted the Win7 partition and chose Restart. No sweat.
The machine booted to Win8 just like downtown.

Of course, I had made a complete clone of the two-partition drive before
I tried the above (I'm not as dumb as I look).

[1] In other words, it happened without me doing or knowing anything.


You're too humble.

There are a myriad of things you could have done to gum it up.
 
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G

Gene E. Bloch

Gene E. Bloch said:
On Sat, 09 Feb 2013 17:15:51 -0500, (e-mail address removed) wrote:


Gene> On Sat, 09 Feb 2013 16:31:42 -0500, (e-mail address removed)
wrote:
I fixed it.

The reason the Windows DVD was unable to fix the boot manager was
that the partition was not marked as active.

I used the command prompt and diskpart to mark the partition,
then ran bootrec with a few parameters.

Then the windows DVD was able to create a boot manager on the
drive.

I used the steps on this webpage:

http://heiser.net/posts/3256

This is now a good installation, and the SSD boot time is
wonderful!

Thanks all, Andrew

Gene> Thanks for telling us how you solved it. Besides letting us
Gene> know that you did fix it, it teaches us (TINU) something.

You all pointed me in the right direction.

Now I am wondering how I could avoid the problem in the first place.
It seemed like a great idea to leave the old disk in the machine and
fully install the new OS independently, having the old boot to fall back
on if it took longer than expected.

Is there a way to do that? Install on a different disk without having
the boot manager stay on the original disk?

Gene> I've bookmarked your link, partly because I might face a
Gene> similar problem soon. I am thinking of making my Win8 + Win7
Gene> machine into a Win8-only box.

Gene> And of course, my judgment on your issue was wrong; it's just
Gene> as well you didn't believe me :)

I must have given the impression that I installed windows on a different
machine. Even I know better than that!

??

I installed Win8 as a dual boot on a Win7 machine, yielding two
partitions on one internal drive.

As I gain experience with 8, I am thinking I don't need the Win7 any
more, so I want to do three things:

1. Make it single boot. That's easy; I do it from time to time with
EasyBCD.

2. Kill the Win7 partition and expand the Win8 to fill the drive. Also
easy with EaseUS or other partition software.

3. Continue to be able to boot the system in W8. That's where I get
nervous.

The link you gave seems like a way to get to #3 if it fails initially.
Finally I can follow up:

Today I made my Win7 + Win8 into a Win8 only single-partition
single-boot drive. Easy peasy, no problems.

The installation of Win8 had automatically[1] made the Win8 partition
the boot drive, so once I removed Win7 from the boot list with the help
of EasyBCD, I deleted the Win7 partition and chose Restart. No sweat.
The machine booted to Win8 just like downtown.

Of course, I had made a complete clone of the two-partition drive before
I tried the above (I'm not as dumb as I look).

[1] In other words, it happened without me doing or knowing anything.
You're too humble.

There are a myriad of things you could have done to gum it up.
LOL!

You've got me figured out to a T...
 
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