Win 7 almost belly up.


S

Seum

Last night about 10 pm I decided to shut down my Win 7 and a message
arrived indicating that 37 (YUP, thirty seven) updates were coming.
I checked an hour later and it had arrived at number 16. About midnight
I checked again - still at 16, so I decided to let it run all night.
At 6.30 am it was still at 16 and completely frozen.

I rebooted and it went about its business as usual. Then it displayed a
file with as many failures as successes.

Has anyone had an experience of this?
 
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S

Stephen Wolstenholme

Last night about 10 pm I decided to shut down my Win 7 and a message
arrived indicating that 37 (YUP, thirty seven) updates were coming.
I checked an hour later and it had arrived at number 16. About midnight
I checked again - still at 16, so I decided to let it run all night.
At 6.30 am it was still at 16 and completely frozen.

I rebooted and it went about its business as usual. Then it displayed a
file with as many failures as successes.

Has anyone had an experience of this?
I have seen that type of hang up on a laptop which is only used about
once a week. There can be lots of updates waiting to be applied since
the previous week. The updating has always gone to completion when
restarted.

Steve

--
Neural network applications, help and support.

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EasyNN-plus. Neural Networks plus. www.easynn.com
SwingNN. Forecast with Neural Networks. www.swingnn.com
JustNN. Just Neural Networks. www.justnn.com
 
P

Paul

Seum said:
Last night about 10 pm I decided to shut down my Win 7 and a message
arrived indicating that 37 (YUP, thirty seven) updates were coming.
I checked an hour later and it had arrived at number 16. About midnight
I checked again - still at 16, so I decided to let it run all night.
At 6.30 am it was still at 16 and completely frozen.

I rebooted and it went about its business as usual. Then it displayed a
file with as many failures as successes.

Has anyone had an experience of this?
I wonder if one of those updates was SP1 ???

That could be what jammed up.

You should have handled SP1 separately. Then things
would look much less ugly!

Paul
 
A

Allen Drake

Last night about 10 pm I decided to shut down my Win 7 and a message
arrived indicating that 37 (YUP, thirty seven) updates were coming.
I checked an hour later and it had arrived at number 16. About midnight
I checked again - still at 16, so I decided to let it run all night.
At 6.30 am it was still at 16 and completely frozen.

I rebooted and it went about its business as usual. Then it displayed a
file with as many failures as successes.

Has anyone had an experience of this?

Did you review and research every update to see if you actually need
them all or any? Windows bloatware won't do it. I thought XP was bad
but I am experiencing the same and believe MS has done less then ever
before to complete the development before release of another Windows..
Shameful.
 
N

Nil

You should have handled SP1 separately. Then things
would look much less ugly!
If there are many updates at once, I like to do them just a few at a
time, then run things for a little while to make sure everything's OK.
If there's an issue, I'll have a better idea where the problem lies,
and it would be easier to recover. This is just my cautious side in
action, though - I've never actually had to recover from a MS update
issue.
 
S

Seum

Alias said:
That's what you get for setting updates to install automatically.
Personally, I do it manually and disable my anti virus program and
resident anti malware programs before proceeding and while I'm doing
updates, I don't do anything else.

They started to arrive the very first time I connected to the 'net.
It was not a big problem until yesterday. I think once a week download
would be enough. If it happens again I will start my own downloads.
 
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S

Seum

Stephen said:
I have seen that type of hang up on a laptop which is only used about
once a week. There can be lots of updates waiting to be applied since
the previous week. The updating has always gone to completion when
restarted.

Steve
I'll keep watching it and if it starts to bother me, like last night, I
will do my own downloads.
 
C

Charles Tomaras

Seum said:
Last night about 10 pm I decided to shut down my Win 7 and a message
arrived indicating that 37 (YUP, thirty seven) updates were coming.
I checked an hour later and it had arrived at number 16. About midnight I
checked again - still at 16, so I decided to let it run all night.
At 6.30 am it was still at 16 and completely frozen.

I rebooted and it went about its business as usual. Then it displayed a
file with as many failures as successes.

Has anyone had an experience of this?
My computer is always connected to the internet. I use Microsoft Security
Essentials, I have auto update on. Never a problem, never 37 updates. It
just works.
 
S

Seum

Paul said:
I wonder if one of those updates was SP1 ???
I saw numerous SP1s flying by.
That could be what jammed up.
It could well be that.
You should have handled SP1 separately. Then things
would look much less ugly!
This time I did not have a choice. I had intended to download SP1 myself
but I had too many other things to do.
I cleared the Seagate drive and installed it in the "new" box. My Win2K
CD was in the tray and it started up ok. I selected 120GB for one
partition and NTFS formatted it. It crashed with message "Error loading
operating system. This also happened a few weeks ago. " The BIOS
settings may be doing that. I am working on them with: ACPI, BIOS, Bios
Updater, Memory (methinks!), and USB3.

You'll hear me bawling again soon :)

Have a great week.

Thanks again :)
 
J

J. P. Gilliver (John)

Nil said:
If there are many updates at once, I like to do them just a few at a
time, then run things for a little while to make sure everything's OK.
Sounds prudent. How, however, do you stop it after a few, if it has a
lot to do? Or is that that you have it set to
download-but-let-me-decide-whether-to-install?

If that is the case, how do you get it to continue?
[]
 
A

Anthony Buckland

My computer is always connected to the internet. I use Microsoft Security
Essentials, I have auto update on. Never a problem, never 37 updates. It
just works.
I've never had a problem with Win 7 updates. I didn't even
realize I'd inadvertently elected automatic updates until
I went to the can in the middle of the night and found the
screen lit up from the resulting reboot. I'll leave it alone
until something goes wrong for me. With Win XP I always did
it manually when the yellow shield arrived, and did _big_
collections of updates in segments after the one time I had
to restore my machine because the nth out of about 2n
rendered it unbootable -- the OP's situation, but worse.

Concerning turning off my AV, I extremely rarely do that.
To update, I have to be connected to the net, and I'm not
about to go naked for any reason while connected -- OK,
one exception, when I install a new version of the AV.
All of those other software installations, for instance,
which insisted that the AV be off have worked just fine
for me for many years with the AV watching.

I wonder about the OP's "completely frozen" because just
yesterday I updated somebody else's somewhat older XP
machine. About 15 updates, and two in the middle took
over an hour each. If I were less patient, I might have
concluded these two updates weren't going to work, but
eventually, in time for supper, they did.
 
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A

Allen Drake

Nil said:
If there are many updates at once, I like to do them just a few at a
time, then run things for a little while to make sure everything's OK.
Sounds prudent. How, however, do you stop it after a few, if it has a
lot to do? Or is that that you have it set to
download-but-let-me-decide-whether-to-install?

If that is the case, how do you get it to continue?
[]

At any time you can hide as many updates as you like then un hide them
a few at a time if you visit Windows Update site. I believe you can
actually download them to disk or folder and install them yourself
after you decide if you really need them.

Al.
 
G

Gene E. Bloch

Nil said:
If there are many updates at once, I like to do them just a few at a
time, then run things for a little while to make sure everything's OK.
Sounds prudent. How, however, do you stop it after a few, if it has a
lot to do? Or is that that you have it set to
download-but-let-me-decide-whether-to-install?

If that is the case, how do you get it to continue?
[]
Like me, Nil (apparently) has windows notify him of the updates without
automatically downloading or installing them.

What I then do is manually go to the View updates part of the screen,
and check the ones I want to install. If I used Nil's suggestion, I
would then check only a few at a time and check a few more after each
reboot.

Thus you don't have to stop it after a while.

BTW, there is usually (in my experience) a cancel button in the install
screen when the process is underway, although it seems to lose track of
some or all of the downloads that aren't yet installed.
 
N

Nil

Like me, Nil (apparently) has windows notify him of the updates
without automatically downloading or installing them.

What I then do is manually go to the View updates part of the
screen, and check the ones I want to install. If I used Nil's
suggestion, I would then check only a few at a time and check a
few more after each reboot.
Yes, that's exactly how I have it set up. I don't want any of that
stuff to happen automatically, I want to initiate the updates when it's
convenient for me.
 
S

Stephen Wolstenholme

My computer is always connected to the internet. I use Microsoft Security
Essentials, I have auto update on. Never a problem, never 37 updates. It
just works.
There is never a problem on my main, permanenty connected computer or
on daily used laptop. The only problems I see are on an laptop that is
only used once a week just for sync. A weeks worth of updates can
cause problems.

Steve

--
Neural network applications, help and support.

Neural Network Software. www.npsl1.com
EasyNN-plus. Neural Networks plus. www.easynn.com
SwingNN. Forecast with Neural Networks. www.swingnn.com
JustNN. Just Neural Networks. www.justnn.com
 
T

Twayne

In
Alias said:
Set it to inform but not download or install. I have
never had a problem with Windows updates since Windows 95
doing it the way I describe above. Some people claim it
isn't necessary to disable to AV and anti malware
resident programs but my thinking is why have them
checking everything the updates are doing? I do the same
thing whenever I install or update a program.
All good points and I agree.
Good Post.
 
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J

J. P. Gilliver (John)

In message <[email protected]>, Gene E. Bloch
Like me, Nil (apparently) has windows notify him of the updates without
automatically downloading or installing them.

What I then do is manually go to the View updates part of the screen,
and check the ones I want to install. If I used Nil's suggestion, I
would then check only a few at a time and check a few more after each
reboot.
Sounds sensible.
Thus you don't have to stop it after a while.

BTW, there is usually (in my experience) a cancel button in the install
screen when the process is underway, although it seems to lose track of
some or all of the downloads that aren't yet installed.
Ah, there wasn't under XP - just a "do not switch off" or similar.
 
D

D

If there are many updates at once, I like to do them just a few at a
time, then run things for a little while to make sure everything's OK.
If there's an issue, I'll have a better idea where the problem lies,
and it would be easier to recover. This is just my cautious side in
action, though - I've never actually had to recover from a MS update
issue.
That's my practice, too, as well as having it set to "Let me choose". I
usually do ~ 3 at a time, when there are multiple updates. I also
manually add a restore point before each round, even though I think
"Updates" is supposed to do this as part of the process. Better safe
than sorry.
 
J

J. P. Gilliver (John)

D said:
That's my practice, too, as well as having it set to "Let me choose". I
usually do ~ 3 at a time, when there are multiple updates. I also
manually add a restore point before each round, even though I think
Given that the number of restore points kept is limited, you're
increasing the risk of pushing the last good one off the end ...
"Updates" is supposed to do this as part of the process. Better safe
than sorry.
.... especially if you're doubling it like that (-:!

[I don't know how much of a problem the finite size is. Though recently
found, on a friend's system, that the restore point I'd saved last time
I was there ... well, it was visible, but we decided to make one for the
current position before reverting to it - after which the one we were
going to go back to was no longer there. Humph.]
 
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G

Gene E. Bloch

Ah, there wasn't under XP - just a "do not switch off" or similar.
I'm talking about on the program's screen during download and install.
There is still often a "Don't touch that dial"[1] warning during
shutdown and startup after the update.

But since the cancel operation seems not to be robust, I avoid it.

[1] From the radio show "Blondie" of the late 40's
 

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