SOLVED Upgrade to 64bit


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I currently have Win 7 Home Premium 32 bit. Is there a way to upgrade to the same version in 64bit with the license I have or must I buy a new license?

I do have a 64bit win7 DVD available.

Thanks
 
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clifford_cooley

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I currently have Win 7 Home Premium 32 bit. Is there a way to upgrade to the same version in 64bit with the license I have or must I buy a new license?

I do have a 64bit win7 DVD available.

Thanks
As long as you go from:
32-bit Home Premium to 64-bit Home Premium.
Or
32-bit Professional to 64-bit Professional

You can switch Bit Versions but you can't switch Windows Editions using the same key.
 
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So I can just enter the same key that I used for my windows 32-bit with no problems (same edition, of course)?

Nice. :) I'll give it a try.
 

clifford_cooley

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If for some reason the key doesn't work during Install. Wait until after the Install and then you can Activate from the bottom of Computer Properties page.

Shortcut key to open Computer Properties is "Windows Key + Pause".
Scroll to the bottom it should say "Activate Windows Now" or "Windows is Activated".

If Windows has been deactivated for some reason, it may say something along the line of "You may be a victim of piracy". I have actually seen this before and going through activation again straighten things out. :)
 
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Thanks. I did purchase my win 7 home premium 32bit legally, I just wanted to make sure this was allowed by Microsoft. I don't want to go through the pain of reinstalling only to find out I need to buy a new key.

Sorry for being skeptical but... I'll come back and mark it as solved when it works! :D

___________________________________________________
"You mark that frame an 8, and you're entering a world of pain."
 
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TrainableMan

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- From 32 Home Premium to 64 Home Premium, your legitimate 32-bit key will work for 64.
- You computer CPU/mobo must be able to support 64-bit.
- You will need 64-bit drivers, 32-bit drivers won't work. Sometimes 64-bit drivers for older components were never released and unless W7 has generic ones these items won't work.
- It requires a complete reinstall so all programs will need to be reinstalled
- Also if your computer came with W7 preinstalled then it likely also included extra software from the manufacturer. This manufacturer specific stuff would NOT be included on a regular W7 DVD. Usually things like touchpad software, on screen volume indicators, trial versions of anti-virus and Microsoft office, etc. If you use these programs you will likely need to get them from the manufacturer or find a replacement.

It is a good idea to use Windows Easy Transfer to back up your user logons and your data, then that can easily be restored on the 64-bit install. This comes with W7, simply type easy transfer in the start search bar.
 
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It worked! Thanks!

I forgot that I had purchased an upgrade version, so I had to reinstall Vista first and then Upgrade to win7 (64-bit). That was a pain, but it worked in the end!
:)
 

clifford_cooley

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It worked! Thanks!

I forgot that I had purchased an upgrade version, so I had to reinstall Vista first and then Upgrade to win7 (64-bit). That was a pain, but it worked in the end!
:)
I'm happy it worked out for you. :)

You should have been able to clean install (also known as fresh install) from the upgrade without needing Vista installed first. I myself and many others have done this ourselves.However you will still need the Vista license because an Upgrade is only legit if there is a qualifying older OS license available to upgrade from. So Vista is still needed for legal purposes but shouldn't be needed to install Windows 7.
 
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I'm happy it worked out for you. :)

You should have been able to clean install (also known as fresh install) from the upgrade without needing Vista installed first. I myself and many others have done this ourselves.However you will still need the Vista license because an Upgrade is only legit if there is a qualifying older OS license available to upgrade from. So Vista is still needed for legal purposes but shouldn't be needed to install Windows 7.
Interesting! How would this work? Would I enter my Vista key during the win7 install and then my win7 key after?

That would have saved me a lot of time...
 

clifford_cooley

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Interesting! How would this work? Would I enter my Vista key during the win7 install and then my win7 key after?

That would have saved me a lot of time...
I thought that would be the way Windows 7 would install myself.

However once I received my upgrade copy, Windows 7 installed and never asked for anything as if it was the Full Version.

The only thing I know to say, there are full version keys and there are upgrade keys. Microsoft knows the difference and if you are ever audited, the upgrade keys must be presented with an older OS key.
 
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Hmm... when I reinstalled, it specifically gave me an activation error referring to the fact that my key was valid for upgrades only. Maybe Microsoft activation has gotten smarter?
 

clifford_cooley

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Hmm... when I reinstalled, it specifically gave me an activation error referring to the fact that my key was valid for upgrades only. Maybe Microsoft activation has gotten smarter?
And if you try installing without putting the key in. Does this not install Windows with a 30 day trial?
 
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Yes it does install in that case, but I can't activate it with my Win7 upgrade key.
 

clifford_cooley

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Yikes, how do they expect us to help people when things don't always work the same way. I'm starting to feel as if I am leading you on a wild goose chase.

The only option I see you have left would be to call MS for activation at this point.

I feel kinda bad because you did have Windows 7 activated after upgrading from Vista.
 
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Yikes, how do they expect us to help people when things don't always work the same way. I'm starting to feel as if I am leading you on a wild goose chase.

The only option I see you have left would be to call MS for activation at this point.

I feel kinda bad because you did have Windows 7 activated after upgrading from Vista.
Oh no, don't worry, I did manage to get it activated. It's just that I had to do a full install of Vista before hand, which is kinda silly of MS.
 
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My legit activation went bad months after Win 7 was installed on my laptop computer, that was shipped with Vista. I bought the upgrade to Win 7 when it was offered to many in the summer of 2009, for $49. It arrived in Nov 2009, what I thought was almost a month late. Then, I decided I wanted more features, so I went the Anytime Upgrade route in Dec 2009.

Everything was cool until I voluntary accepted the KB971033 update, after which I had a black screen, and a notice that I may be a victim of software piracy, or similar wording. I was thinking WTF, my install was legit, and I still have my Vista COA & reinstall discs, plus my receipts for my Win 7 upgrades.

After spending 2 hours on the phone with MS, things were straightened out. They said that normally it wouldn't take so long, but that update was just released (KB971033), and there were more calls than normal.

BTW, the same thing happened when MS decided to start this anti-piracy deal with XP in 2006. I had to call and get that taken care of too, but it took much longer, like 4 days. There were some serious bugs in the system when WGA was introduced.

No big deal, it's just that for the amount of money that Windows OS's costs, these kind of mistakes aren't expected on a massive level.
 

Nibiru2012

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I am baffled why people spend their hard-earned dollars on an "upgrade" version of a Windows OS when they can get the full version. Sure it's more money, but there are FAR fewer issues with a clean install of the full version versus an upgrade install over Vista.

For that matter, just by the OEM version and be done with it and save a lot of money. Oh sure, now we'll get into that little bit of "he said, she said" as to whether or not it's legitimate for an everyday user rather than a bona fide system builder. I don't care about that really and to be honest neither does MS. If they did then they wouldn't allow it to be sold at Newegg, TigerDirect, BestBuy, WalMart, etc. A system builder would HAVE to get it from them directly. I'm sure Digerati will jump in on this, as he has in the past.

Basically, we're splitting legalese hairs here. It is a fact that virtually all licensed drivers will speed from time to time or coast through a stop sign or change lanes without signalling or make an illegal U-turn. Does the city/state law enforcement ticket them every time this happens? No, because they have better things to do. Just as MS is not really concerned about a single end-use home-built computer user installing the OEM version. MS has bigger ducks to fry, euphemistically speaking.

I am sure a some of the members here will jump on this post like ducks on a June bug, but what I have stated is the way things are out there in the real world. I have installed numerous legitimate Windows 7 OS for clients, friends, etc., using the OEM disc and key they had purchased (on my advice) and they haven't had issues at all. Now comes the issue of replacing the motherboard which the OEM key is tied to at MS Activation Center. I can cite several examples of where a motherboard was replaced and the product key reactivated by calling MS support. Yes, the replacement motherboard was different than the original. MS support is there to help not to hinder the end-user of their product.
 

TrainableMan

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For me, coming from XP, the upgrade version was exactly the same as the full version at a lower cost. I was able to complete reformat the HD and had absolutely no issues activating. And I do not have an OEM version so I'm entitled to actual Microsoft support plus I don't have to worry about the legality if I ever upgrade my mobo.

I suspect the poster could have activated his system without reinstalling Vista, and had a much cleaner system, because that is exactly what you have to do if you went from Vista 32 to W7 64. But as to how this is done I do not know as I've never tried. (EDIT: see Beamish's post below to see how. This will give you a much cleaner build than upgrading over Vista)
 
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Reinstalling Windows 7 upgrade without installing XP or Vista.
Saturday, 22 January 2011 23:23
Here is a a nifty little trick that Microsoft themselves built into the Windows 7 Upgrade disc, it contains the full version of the OS, all Upgrade discs do, this will work for Vista too. It's called the 'double install method.'
If for whatever reason you need to do a clean install of Windows 7 due to viruses or malware you can't get rid of, etc here is all you have to do:
Insert your Windows 7 Upgrade disc into your computer and reboot. Once it loads select your language. After that it will ask you if you want to 'Upgrade' or 'Custom Install' select custom install. It will show you your hard drives select the one you want and then click 'advanced' at the bottom right of the screen and select Format to format your hard drive. It will format the drive and then continue to proceed to install.
Now the important part once it gets the screen to add your registration key, SKIP IT for now, and continue to let Windows 7 install. Then run the Update Manager to get the latest updates and drivers if need be.
Now insert your Windows 7 Upgrade disc again and now select the 'Upgrade' option for the install let it run it's install again this time it take shorter to do. Now when it asks for your registration key you can now enter it or you can enter it in at Control Panel> System and Security> System after the install is done.
The reason why you have to do it this way is because when you do a custom install the OS puts system info that's a clean system and your registration key will only work for an Upgrade, so when you install it again as an Upgrade the OS marks it as an upgrade and not a clean install. It's a perfectly legit way to do it and Microsoft themselves programmed it to be that way.

Apologize for not being able to give attribution for the above.
Added personal info: Install Motherboard Drivers, video, sound, sata hard drive, lan and utilities.
Follow this with external hard ware and programs, utilities, (remember serial numbers), if needed.
Create a Aconis Image and install on external hard drive.

As noted by others,
http://www.winsupersite.com/windows7.aspx
has this infomation.
 
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