SOLVED can you Install A win7 64Bit UPGRADE PACK over a 32 bit win7?


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I was wondering if you could install a Windows 7 64 bit upgrade pack over a 32 bit Windows 7

i was just wondering if it was possible
 

clifford_cooley

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You can install a different bit version but only as a clean install. There is no upgrade route from one bit version to the next. I hear there are too many differences that would cause problems down the road to allow one bit version to install over the other.
 
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clifford_cooley

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If you are using the same edition and changing bit versions, you don't need to buy anything. The activation key you are currently using will activate either bit versions. All you need to do is install the same edition of either bit version and activate with the same activation key you are currently using.

OEM installs require a sticker to be placed somewhere on the case that shows the activation key. If you don't know the activation key you are using there is software that will show you the activation key that was used.

A few apps that will show you the key used.
  1. Speccy
  2. SIW
 

TrainableMan

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If you are simply switching over from, for example, W7 Home Premium 32-bit to W7 Home Premium 64-bit then, as Clifford said, it's allowed under your current license but you will need the 64-bit software if you don't have the DVD. You can find links to W7 SP1 >>HERE<< to download and burn if you need it.
 

clifford_cooley

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If you are simply switching over from, for example, W7 Home Premium 32-bit to W7 Home Premium 64-bit then, as Clifford said, it's allowed under your current license but you will need the 64-bit software if you don't have the DVD. You can find links to W7 SP1 >>HERE<< to download and burn if you need it.
Yeah, I forgot to mention that part. :/ Thanks TM.:)
 
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the thing is is that ive lost the windows disc so thats why i was gonna buy ab upgarde as it was cheaper than the full.
 

Digerati

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I am afraid there may be some confusion here.

If you are using the same edition and changing bit versions, you don't need to buy anything.
That is NOT necessarily true at all. It depends on what type the original license is.

If a full "Retail" license, then both 32-bit and 64-bit installation disks come in the box and you are allowed to install one OR the other. Not both at the same time. You can, with the retail license, change (with a fresh install) from 32 to 64-bit with no additional purchases.

HOWEVER, OEM licenses are sold individually. When you buy OEM (or with OEM preinstalled on your pre-built system), you must choose 32-bit or 64-bit at the time of purchase. You only get one installation disk. If you desire to change later, you MUST buy a new license.

the thing is is that ive lost the windows disc so thats why i was gonna buy ab upgarde as it was cheaper than the full.
Well, then you will need to buy an upgrade disk and it should work.
 

TrainableMan

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Win 8 is due out soon and the media edition should sell for $40 in most countries. I would consider waiting if you can't find the 64-bit W7 upgrade disks for around that price.
 

clifford_cooley

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HOWEVER, OEM licenses are sold individually. When you buy OEM (or with OEM preinstalled on your pre-built system), you must choose 32-bit or 64-bit at the time of purchase. You only get one installation disk. If you desire to change later, you MUST buy a new license.
Can you provide evidence plainly written out by Microsoft. The OEM sticker on my case does not have a designation between 32 or 64 bit. Windows 7 may not ship with both version of install disk but that doesn't mean the activation code can not be used to install either one. If you can provide evidence, i will not continue spreading misconception on the topic.
 

clifford_cooley

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You would still need to clean install a different bit version. Windows Anytime Upgrade is an in-place upgrade (from one OS edition to another) not a clean install option.
 

Digerati

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Can you provide evidence plainly written out by Microsoft. The OEM sticker on my case does not have a designation between 32 or 64 bit. Windows 7 may not ship with both version of install disk but that doesn't mean the activation code can not be used to install either one. If you can provide evidence, i will not continue spreading misconception on the topic.
You are asking me to prove a negative - like proving spirits don't exist.

Here's it in a nutshell (self-reference - btw;)) - Microsoft sells 32-bit Windows 7 and 64-bit Windows 7 "System Builder" (OEM) licenses individually, as separate products - at a cheaper cost - to system builders! That says it all to me. Combo ("full retail") packs cost more than individuals (OEMs) because you get more in the box.

System Builder licenses are not sold to the "end-user" or consumer. They are sold to the builder. It is important to understand if you are buying and installing OEM licenses, you are doing so as the "system builder", not as the user of the product - even if you are building for your own personal use. And as per your System Builder license agreement, you paid a cheaper cost for the version you (as the builder, not user) purchased. And you agreed to abide by the System Builder terms.

The consumer (even if self-built) then agrees to the EULA where for W7Pro it only says,
Alternative Versions. The software may include more than one version, such as 32-bit and
64-bit. You may use only one version at one time. If the manufacturer or installer provides you
with a one-time selection between language versions, you may use only the one language
version you select.
I included the language part because if you wanted multiple languages you could have paid for the more expensive Windows 7 Ultimate. Same difference, no?

Is it fair? Well, I wish Microsoft products were cheaper - especially since there are many excellent Linux/open source/free alternatives. But note the system builder should pass some of those saving on to you, the end-user with lower competitive prices too. And the fact there are free alternatives but we still Windows puts consumers at a disadvantage.

And how fair is it to the consumer who paid more for the full retail license because he wanted both versions?

I can't take back an opened Almond Joy if I really wanted a Mounds. I should have bought a combo box.

If I buy the new Batman movie on less capable DVD format, I can't copy my neighbor's Blu-Ray from his more expensive Blu-Ray+DVD+UV Digital copy "combo"-pack. Same movie!

Why do you want 64-bit? To take advantage of the advanced hardware technologies.
Why do you want Blu-Ray? To take advantage of the advanced hardware technologies.

Did I prove a negative?

Retail licenses? No problem. You can swap back and forth (on different machines - one at a time) as much as you want. But if you bought a System Builders license, you paid less but you bought a license for a specific version of Windows, purchased for a specific computer/motherboard.
 

clifford_cooley

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Retail licenses? No problem. You can swap back and forth (on different machines - one at a time) as much as you want. But if you bought a System Builders license, you paid less but you bought a license for a specific version of Windows, purchased for a specific computer/motherboard.
I'm sorry but I must disagree if you can not provide evidence from Microsoft. Until you can provide evidence, please do not counter my posting on the issue again or I will take it as a sign that you are deliberately spreading misconception.

Unless Microsoft presents evidence that their OEM license are only good for the specific bit version that was purchased, they can not hold anyone responsible for changing bit versions using the same activation key. At least with changing motherboards, they make it clear a new license is needed. I've found nothing to suggest other than personal opinion that a new license is needed when changing OEM bit versions.

And for the savings when purchasing OEM. There are other things to consider like no Microsoft support for the OS and the fact that the license can't be transfered to a new system.
 

Digerati

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I'm sorry but I must disagree if you can not provide evidence from Microsoft. Until you can provide evidence, please do not counter my posting on the issue again or I will take it as a sign that you are deliberately spreading misconception..
What? Come on Clifford. You know you only get 32-bit or 64-bit in the order. Disks are cheap. It's the documentation and pretty boxes that makes Retail packaging more expensive. If MS wanted you to have both, they would have put them in the shrinkwrap.

The retail license clearly states you can go back and forth with the same key. The OEM license does not. Unless the OEM license says I can, like the retail version does, I am not going to be recommending or giving advice suggesting readers do it either.

There is lots and lots of documentation clearly showing with the Retail license (which comes with both disks) you can do this. But none that I can find that says you can with the System Builders license. Therefore, I would ask respectfully (so we all may learn from this) you provide some link to Microsoft that says end users of System Builder 32-bit licenses can upgrade to 64-bit using the same key. If is saves users money - legally - I am all for it.

But I fear it is another case of common practice does not make right. The OEM 64-bit version is a different product than the 32-bit version. And most importantly, it is sold separately.

@Pc Geek - you asked if you could install a Windows 7 64-bit "upgrade pack" over 32-bit Windows 7.

Yes, you can purchase an upgrade pack and use that to install over your existing Windows.

Windows Anytime
You can use Windows Anytime Upgrade to upgrade from a 32‑bit edition of Windows 7 to a 32‑bit edition of Windows 7 and from a 64‑bit edition of Windows 7 to a 64‑bit edition of Windows 7, but you can’t upgrade from a 32‑bit edition of Windows 7 to a 64‑bit edition of Windows 7 or vice versa.
I am not 100% sure. But I have seen lots of evidence to suggest this is another restriction to cheaper System Builders license and no evidence (except forum posts) to show otherwise. I welcome any.
 

TrainableMan

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First off, the user never said they HAVE an OEM version, they said they lost their W7 DVD. So Digerati made his point but this is the first time I ever heard of it. Anyway, we should not assume that is what the user is trying to do. Unless the OP says differently, we should assume they have a normal W7 install and they lost the DVD(s).

@Pc Geek - you asked if you could install a Windows 7 64-bit "upgrade pack" over 32-bit Windows 7.

Yes, you can purchase an upgrade pack and use that to install over your existing Windows.
This can be very confusing because you can't really install it OVER 32-bit. It is a legal progression path so you won't violate any licensing. But the truth is it requires backing up all your data, formatting, and doing a complete reinstall. In fact, it may require a double install because of the upgrade not "seeing" the license the first time on the freshly formatted drive.

I mentioned this to the OP as well as warning him to verify his CPU etc were 64-bit capable and the OP's reply was
PC Geek said:
"ive tried this before but my pc ant having it it says there id a 'driver' missing from my cd drive an d my CPU and MB are 64 bit capable".
Now regardless of whether you download the disks and burn them or buy Upgrade DVDs you may run into a missing driver. Your system may have a CD drive that is old and not recognized, or a new SSD, or a 2TB+ Hard drive, or USB 3.0, etc and these drivers did not come with W7 ... so you should go to the manufacturer's website and download the 64-bit drivers before you format. Put them on a disk or flash drive so you have them when W7 asks for it (obviously a flash drive is a bad choice if the driver missing is a USB).
 
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TrainableMan

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Yep, just make sure you get the same version as the license you own. A Home Premium license won't work on an Ultimate install nor visa versa.
 
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Digerati

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Sorry but we need to start looking at this differently. Even if one in the same, the system builder and the end-user are two different entities with two different contracts with Microsoft. And the retail purchaser is in a different contract (license "agreement") yet. Very similar, but with a few very important distinctions. And in upgrade situations like this, we as helpers must determine what the user has, and offer the proper advice from there - even if it is not something we particularly agree with.

Otherwise, we may be sending those seeking our help down an illegal path - totally oblivious they just did something illegal. Whether we agree or not with the license terms or the laws that support them is not important. And what the user does with the information is not really either. But they should have it.
It is a legal progression path so you won't violate any licensing.
Again, that's the area of contention, isn't it? PLEASE! What says it is legal?

Forgive my emphasize but,
The terms of the Retail license expressly state you can.
The terms of the System Builders license does not.
Why is that being ignored? Microsoft made it a point to put that in the Retail license. Are you assuming the Microsoft lawyers forgot to put it in the System Builders license? Clifford wants me to show where it says you can't. I can't do that. License agreements tell you how you can use the product, not how you can't.

Unless someone can come up with an official MS link that says you can, as it does with the Retail license, I see no other legal, or ethical choice but to purchase a new license (or go Linux).

OEM licenses have never - TTBOMK, never ever entitled users to the contents of the full "Retail" package - except maybe for a trial period - without paying extra. Why do you expect an exception here?

By the same token, the buyers of individual products (in any industry) are not entitled to the contents of the more expensive combo packs for free either. Why treat these two different versions of Windows differently? Because it's technically possible is not a valid reason. Nor is, because so many do it anyway.

Unless the OP says differently, we should assume they have a normal W7 install and they lost the DVD(s).
And what is a "normal" install? BY far, more OEM licenses are in use than full Retail. Especially by self-builders, and of course, the big factory brands.

Please don't ignore the individual DVD vs BluRay/DVD/UVDC combo pack analogy. A movie on a disk is software, just as a program is. It is the same movie. They are governed by the same or similar intellectual property/copyright laws as software. We are not buying the media (disks), we are buying the license to use it. And by continuing to use the product, we agree to the terms of that product's license.

It is not like swapping a red car for an otherwise identical blue car, moving the tags and calling it good. 64-bit supports enhanced features, better security, and advanced hardware while providing better performance. It takes two development teams, working separately and together. HUGE capital investments for the TWO products.

You cannot use an OEM Norton AV license to assume it is legal to copy your neighbor's full Security Suite! It is sold separately for less.

Oh, as for the SB license and "no Microsoft support" - that is because the system builder (as per the terms of the SB license) is required to provide that support for 1 year and the end-user is still entitled to 1 year's free support - even if builder and end-user are one in the same. So the OEM end-user is entitled to the same quality and duration support as the Retail license buyer.

We must remember System Builder licenses are not sold to the end-user.

Again, I don't always agree in Microsoft's marketing or pricing policies, but I support and will defend their Right to set them, and the laws and order of society that makes up a civilization. I think it is our duty, as help providers, to ensure readers have ALL the information on the topic in order to make an informed decision.

I'll step out of this now, but seriously, when it comes to giving advice about anything licensed and copyrighted, I urge you to verify with an official "published" source first to make sure it says it can legally be done. The Retail license says it can. The OEM does not.
 
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