Running XP Programs on Windows 7 Home Premium


F

Fokke Nauta

Nope, that is the big secret. Amazing how well that trick works when it
works. MS-DOS had a similar command to lie to the program telling it was
a different version than what it really was too. ;-)
It rings a bell somewhere, but I forgot what it was ...
Used to work with the old MS-DOS ...

Fokke
 
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F

Fokke Nauta

Sheesh man, it must do a bit more than that!
That sounds a bit like getting past the bouncer into a nightclub, but
not how to talk to people inside it.

Ed
No, this compatibility mode is a big achievement of W7. I found out that
a lot of applications which would run under XP will perfectly run in W7
under this compatibility mode.
Otherwise they would have been lost.

Fokke
 
G

Gene Wirchenko

On Thu, 22 Nov 2012 22:52:01 +0200, Steve Hayes

[snip]
Some Borland programs (such as those developed in Turbo Pascal) won't run with
fast processors. It is not a Windows problem, but a hardware problem.
AIUI, it is a software problem. IIRC, there are patches to slow
the programs down so they do not overflow counters. (I think that is
the issue.)

Sincerely,

Gene Wirchenko
 
G

Gene Wirchenko

On Thu, 22 Nov 2012 23:54:32 +0100, Fokke Nauta

[snip]
No, this compatibility mode is a big achievement of W7. I found out that
a lot of applications which would run under XP will perfectly run in W7
under this compatibility mode.
Otherwise they would have been lost.
Yeah, but they screwed up not having that work in all editions of
Windows 7.

Sincerely,

Gene Wirchenko
 
S

Stan Brown

MS Virtual PC 2007 SP1 will install on 7 HP, but is not supported.
Maybe so, but as I said it cannot be _downloaded_ to Windows 7 Home
Premium. (Or at least it could not, when I tried.)

I suppose one could download it to a computer that has Pro or
Ultimate, and then transfer the installer via USB stick, but why
bother when superior alternatives are available?
 
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E

Ed Cryer

BillW50 said:
Nope, that is the big secret. Amazing how well that trick works when it
works. MS-DOS had a similar command to lie to the program telling it was
a different version than what it really was too. ;-)
I wonder if anybody's tried this.
1. Download OE to an XP system.
2. Transfer it by USB stick to a Win7 system.
3. Install and run with XP compatibility.

Ed
 
B

Bob Henson

I wonder if anybody's tried this.
1. Download OE to an XP system.
2. Transfer it by USB stick to a Win7 system.
3. Install and run with XP compatibility.
Why on earth would anyone want to install OE on anything?
 
B

BillW50

I wonder if anybody's tried this.
1. Download OE to an XP system.
2. Transfer it by USB stick to a Win7 system.
3. Install and run with XP compatibility.

Ed
I don't think I ever tried that, but I tried tons of other things. Even
a portable version of OE6. The portable version runs great on any XP
system. But under Windows 7, it crashes every time even before OE
finishes to load.

I know many people have tried to get OE running under Vista or higher.
And some of them are very smart people. And I know of nobody who has
pulled it off yet. I think one needs to find DLLs and SYS files that OE
uses from the XP system and transfer them to the newer Windows. It
probably needs some registry hacks too. And in the process of doing all
of this, the newer Windows may break.
 
B

BillW50

Why on earth would anyone want to install OE on anything?
I know I would and many others would too. I can find anything in OE in a
blink of an eye. Everything else takes lots of clicking and lots of
waiting for indexes to be created and everything.
 
E

Ed Cryer

BillW50 said:
I know I would and many others would too. I can find anything in OE in a
blink of an eye. Everything else takes lots of clicking and lots of
waiting for indexes to be created and everything.
Me too. I've been away from it for well over 3 years; during which time
I've progressed through WLM to Tbird. But I'd install OE quick as a
flash if I could run it outside of some virtual environment program.
I can run it under VMWare, but something inside me revolts against that,
so I stick with Tbird.

Ed
 
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J

John Williamson

Stan said:
Maybe so, but as I said it cannot be _downloaded_ to Windows 7 Home
Premium. (Or at least it could not, when I tried.)

I suppose one could download it to a computer that has Pro or
Ultimate, and then transfer the installer via USB stick, but why
bother when superior alternatives are available?
I downloaded it years ago on an XP computer. I've not tried to yet on 7.

<Checks> It just downloaded and installed here with no problem. Windows
7 HP upgrade version. Firefox 17.
 
B

BillW50

Me too. I've been away from it for well over 3 years; during which time
I've progressed through WLM to Tbird. But I'd install OE quick as a
flash if I could run it outside of some virtual environment program.
I can run it under VMWare, but something inside me revolts against that,
so I stick with Tbird.

Ed
Yup, same here. There are some good things in WLM, but they also had
taken some good things out that OE had. Like you can change all of the
sync settings for all of the newsgroups in one shot with OE6. Under WLM,
you can only do so individually.

I've been using Thunderbird since v1.5. And not because I like it,
because it is the lesser of the evil ones out there. So I have no choice
on my machines that can't run OE6. And one of the few pluses is that I
have lots of computers and Thunderbird is available in portable versions
too. So it is easy to keep everything in sync among them.
 
B

BillW50

Ignorance and stupidity. BillW50 is a prime example. Also they're too
cheap to buy Outlook which, of course, is a much better email program.
For newsgroups, T-Bird is much better than Outhouse Distress.
Ah... I already bought Outlook clueless one. So whenever you finally
give up and actually start telling the truth for once, please wake us
up. ;-)
 
I

Iceman

BillW50 wrote Nov 23 2012 in
I know I would and many others would too. I can find anything in OE in a
blink of an eye. Everything else takes lots of clicking and lots of
waiting for indexes to be created and everything.
OE, after all, is the email client many users know best, and it *does*
have its good points. On my old XP Pro system, however, it takes awfully
long to load.

Eudora used to be the most popular email client before OE came along, and
it's still available as an opensource project.

http://www.eudora.com/archive.html
 
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J

Jake

"Nil" said:
I believe Eudora is now based upon Mozilla's email product, and has
little or nothing in common with the old Eudora
The cited link is to the old version of Eudora, 7.1, which will run
under W7 as long as you don't put it under Program Files.

The new version, Penelope, is almost a fork of Thunderbird, built on the
TBird codebase. The best I can say about it is that it runs. It does not
have most of the features that would invite a person to run Eudora.

Eudora 7.1 is still my preferred email client, but it's long in the
tooth.

-J
 
B

BillW50

BillW50 wrote Nov 23 2012 in

OE, after all, is the email client many users know best, and it *does*
have its good points. On my old XP Pro system, however, it takes awfully
long to load.

Eudora used to be the most popular email client before OE came along, and
it's still available as an opensource project.

http://www.eudora.com/archive.html
I have like 20 computers here and I have never seen OE take along time
to open. Even on really slow computers. Also OE was designed over 15
years ago to run on computers from the 90's with 486 CPUs and 16MB of RAM.

Yes, I used to run Eudora for a period of time. And I used it because at
the time it did something that I needed. Today I don't recall what that
feature was now. But I was glad to dump Eudora the first chance I got.
As it just didn't impress me very much.
 
J

J. P. Gilliver (John)

In message <[email protected]>, Iceman
OE, after all, is the email client many users know best, and it *does*
have its good points. On my old XP Pro system, however, it takes awfully
long to load.
Yes, I've used OE, and found it perfectly adequate a lot of the time. It
also has the advantage - declining now, but definitely at one time -
that there were probably more people who knew it than any other
(possibly all other) email clients, so giving it to (setting it up for)
a newbie meant he'd have more chance of finding someone he could ask if
he had problems.

(It's also what the full Outlook used for news, at least for one or two
versions, maybe around '97 to 2003; at work, we soon learnt to say we
were using Outlook for news, because if we said OE, our internal
helpdesk would say they didn't support it.)
Eudora used to be the most popular email client before OE came along, and
it's still available as an opensource project.
[]
There seem to be two versions for 7: the last real one, 7.1 I think,
which works (apparently with some reservations) but is not going to
develop, and "Eudora OSE" (open source environment, I think), which is a
version of Thunderbird tricked out to _look_ like Eudora (many of the
buttons have been replaced with Eudora ones). [This seems to have
stopped development too.]

For interest: my blind friend wanted to use email on his new 7 machine
(he'd been used to Eudora on XP), and we tried both Eudora OSE and the
dreaded WLM - and eventually went back to the old "real" Eudora. It
wasn't that he wasn't willing to try to learn new things, more that
under both E-OSE and WLM, we found it only too easy to get into
positions where we couldn't move focus with the keyboard. (Blind people
can't use the mouse, to a first approximation.) For example, starting or
replying to an email, we couldn't get the enter cursor into the window
where you edit text! (I have normal - for computer use anyway - sight.)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)[email protected]+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

TV and radio presenters are just like many people, except they tend to wear
make-up all the time. Especially the radio presenters. - Eddie Mair, in Radio
Times 25-31 August 2012
 
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G

Gene E. Bloch

Sheesh man, it must do a bit more than that!
That sounds a bit like getting past the bouncer into a nightclub, but
not how to talk to people inside it.

Ed
You are correct. There is a stash in SysWOW64 of dll's from older
versions, as well as other software tricks, to avoid incompatibilities
with the latest system software and API. Compatibility mode uses the
appropriate set of those for the OS level you choose for a given
program.

Details are next to impossible to find; Google (at least in my hands)
mostly finds instructions on using it.
 

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