running old programs possible?


M

Maurizio

Hello:
I tried to install an old software, which runs well under WIN XP, I got:
The version of this file is not compatible with the version of windows
you're running. Check your computer's system information to see whether
you need an x86(32bit) etc................

I tried to run it with win xp sp3 compatibility mode, I didn't succeed.

is there a solution for that?
it makes no sense to destroy backward compatibility, is this true?

thank you
 
Ad

Advertisements

C

charlie

Hello:
I tried to install an old software, which runs well under WIN XP, I got:
The version of this file is not compatible with the version of windows
you're running. Check your computer's system information to see whether
you need an x86(32bit) etc................

I tried to run it with win xp sp3 compatibility mode, I didn't succeed.

is there a solution for that?
it makes no sense to destroy backward compatibility, is this true?

thank you
What win 7 version are you using? Win 7 Pro with XP running in a virtual
machine may be needed. We've gotten some fairly old games to run
this way. Win 7 32bit is a bit easier than win 7 64 to use to do this
sort of thing.
 
R

richard

Hello:
I tried to install an old software, which runs well under WIN XP, I got:
The version of this file is not compatible with the version of windows
you're running. Check your computer's system information to see whether
you need an x86(32bit) etc................

I tried to run it with win xp sp3 compatibility mode, I didn't succeed.

is there a solution for that?
it makes no sense to destroy backward compatibility, is this true?

thank you
I believe the error message is trying to tell you that you need to run the
program on 32bit.
If you have another partition, try installing it on that.
 
B

Bob I

Perhaps you are trying to run a 16bit installer for said program on the
64 bit Windows 7? That doesn't work.
 
E

Evan Platt

I believe the error message is trying to tell you that you need to run the
program on 32bit.
If you have another partition, try installing it on that.
And how is running the program on another partition going to do
anything different, bullis?

Perhaps it's best you not try to give computer advice, since you
obviously know nothing about computers.
 
W

Wolf K

Hello:
I tried to install an old software, which runs well under WIN XP, I got:
The version of this file is not compatible with the version of windows
you're running. Check your computer's system information to see whether
you need an x86(32bit) etc................

I tried to run it with win xp sp3 compatibility mode, I didn't succeed.
It's not a "true" XP program, but most likely a DOS program whose API
has been tweaked to run on XP.
is there a solution for that?
it makes no sense to destroy backward compatibility, is this true?

thank you
It depends on the program, and the W7 version. I use Pro-64bit, which
runs my 32bit programs (XP versions) without problems. However, I no
longer use Win2000 or earlier versions. If your program was written for
Win 9.x or earlier, there are no guarantees, even if the version you
have ran on Win2000 or XP, as you have discovered. Two solutions: keep
XP on your machine; or use a virtual machine inside Win7 to run XP, and
via that, the old program(s).

From my own experience:
Win 2000: runs DOS (Win9.x and even earlier) programs. It has a nearly
complete DOS component.
Win XP: runs NT/2000 programs and many but not all DOS programs.
Win7: runs XP programs. I don't have W2000 or earlier programs on this
machine anymore.

Games: Depends. Many (most?) of the more complex games use Windows only
as a loader, and have their own direct access to the hardware, in order
to speed up execution. In effect (and sometimes in reality) they load
their own mini-OS. If the screen goes blank before the game appears, you
can be pretty sure that the games is installing its own
direct-to-hardware access software, and bypassing all or most of the
what's built into the OS. These games will usually not run on Windows
versions newer than the one they were written for. Check the system
requirements.

Business programs: Many small businesses have found that their
database/POS/etc programs will not run on newer versions of Windows.
Some of these programs are still DOS-based, so that should not be
surprising. The fact is that many of these old business-level programs
do what they do very well, and are very stable. They may not have the
prettiest interfaces, but that's not an issue. IOW, there's no reason to
"upgrade".

Comment/Side bar:
The main reason newer OSs are so bloated is that the user interface
takes far more horsepower to run than the actual programs. Integrating a
variety of programs so that they interchange data seamlessly is not as
simple as it seems (eg, e-mailing from your word processor requires that
both programs "know" the other's file formats).

It's technically possible to build applications that are OS/interface
neutral: all it would take is a common API layer. Or ship programs with
all current APIs, and let the installer figure out which one to use.
However, without regulatory pressure, this will never happen. The fear
of government intervention often results in consumer-unfriendly business
practices. Not surprising, when you think about it.

HTH
Wolf K.
 
Ad

Advertisements

V

VanguardLH

Maurizio said:
I tried to install an old software, which runs well under WIN XP, I got:
The version of this file is not compatible with the version of windows
you're running. Check your computer's system information to see whether
you need an x86(32bit) etc................

I tried to run it with win xp sp3 compatibility mode, I didn't succeed.

is there a solution for that?
it makes no sense to destroy backward compatibility, is this true?
We are to *guess* if you have a 32- or 64-bit version of Windows 7?
Provide details about YOUR setup. You didn't even mention which
*edition* of Windows 7 that you have.

Windows XP allowed both 16- and 32-bit installers. With 16-bit
installers getting really ancient compared to the newest version of
Windows, 64-bit versions of Vista/7 only permit 32- and 64-bit
installers.

"16-bit programs are not supported on 64-bit versions of Windows Vista
or of Windows 7."
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/926657

You said you already tried compatibility mode. You never mentioned
WHICH edition of Windows 7 that you have. Some of them permit you to
install XP Mode with is Windows VirtualPC running a license of Windows
XP. So you might be able to install your old software in XP Mode.

http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows7/products/features/windows-xp-mode
http://www.microsoft.com/windows/virtual-pc/get-started.aspx

If you have an edition of Windows 7 that doesn't support XP Mode, you
can still get VirtualPC 2007 and install Windows XP in a virtual machine
(VM) to run your 16-bit programs from there. However, you will need a
legitimate license for Windows XP to run it inside a VM. Legitimate
means you never used that XP license to upgrade to another version of
Windows since you only get to maintain the 1 license to Windows across
all the upgrades from the full version (e.g., 1 full + 4 upgrades = 1
license, not 5). So the disadvantage of using Windows inside a VM is
that you need a license for it. XP Mode in Windows 7 (some editions)
gives you both Windows 7 and a Windows XP licenses.

You will still get the 16-bit error if you install XP Mode or Virtual PC
if you just run the 16-bit installer as you have before. You need to
make sure you run the 16-bit install *in* the VM for Windows XP. Sorry,
but I haven't used XP Mode so you'll need to have someone tell you how
to do target an install so it is executed within the VM. With
VirtualPC, you load the VM (it shows in its own console window) and run
the installer there. I have read where users trying to use XP Mode for
16-bit programs couldn't get them to work until they disabled the
Integration Features for XP Mode.

If it's a really old DOS-mode program, neither VirtualPC (running
Windows XP) or XP Mode (under Windows 7) may work. In that case, you
might trying using DOSbox. However, you said the old software ran under
Windows XP so you might get it to work in XP Mode else try VirtualPC.
However, unlike XP Mode, VirtualPC doesn't support USB devices, so if
you're stuck having to use a VMM (virtual machine manager), like
VirtualPC, you might want to instead look at VirtualBox which does
support USB devices. VMplayer (VMserver is no longer supported) which
is free also supports USB devices and is another VMM choice. If it's a
really old DOS-mode program that you happened to get working in Windows
XP, you might instead want to use a VMM to run MS-DOS and run your old
DOS-mode program from there.

While VMs let you run old software under old operating system, or even
under different operating systems (i.e., running Linux in a VM on
Windows), they aren't made for playing games. All the hardware except
the CPU is emulated by software which means it everything in a VM runs
slower, sometimes much slower. If you want to use the native (real)
hardware with your old games, you would have better performance running
those old programs on their intended operating system by using multi-
booting: you use a multi-boot manager to select which OS to load when
you boot your computer. You'll need a multi-boot manager that resides
wholly in the 446-byte bootstrap area of the MBR of the hard disk (first
detected or used by the BIOS), like GAG (gag.sourceforge.net), along
with other primary partitions (on the same or different hard disk as
Windows) where you install the other OS and use the multi-boot manager
to select them to load on booting the computer. Then you're not using
emulated hardware to run your old apps but instead running them in their
own intended OS and on the real hardware for faster and more compatible
operation. Since GAG runs from the MBR bootstrap (outside of any OS),
it should be compatible with Windows 7; however, I haven't used GAG for
awhile and definitely not with Windows Vista or 7 (I now have separate
hosts for each OS to eliminate all the software workarounds).

Windows 7 x86 (32-bit) can run a 16-bit installer in Windows 98/ME
compatibility mode. Windows 7 x64 cannot run 16-bit programs. Although
some 16-bit installers deliver 32-bit programs, you still need to run
the 16-bit installer to extract the 32-bit program. So check if the
software vendor has a later version of their program that uses a 32-bit
installer.

Yes, it does make sense to destroy backward compatibility. Supporting
old stuff requires a lot of overhead and to support it. If you had a
product that was dead for many years, why would you still support it?
Car makers are only required to manufacture parts for 10 years after
introducing a model (after that it comes out of stock or comes from
aftermarket suppliers). Figure 6 years for computer stuff. It is,
after all, /*soft*/ware. Hardware has longer longevity.
 
M

Maurizio

Hello:
I tried to install an old software, which runs well under WIN XP, I got:
The version of this file is not compatible with the version of windows
you're running. Check your computer's system information to see whether
you need an x86(32bit) etc................

I tried to run it with win xp sp3 compatibility mode, I didn't succeed.

is there a solution for that?
it makes no sense to destroy backward compatibility, is this true?

thank you
Thanks all
effectively, I'm using W7 64bits ultimate
 
J

John Williamson

VanguardLH said:
We are to *guess* if you have a 32- or 64-bit version of Windows 7?
Provide details about YOUR setup. You didn't even mention which
*edition* of Windows 7 that you have.

Windows XP allowed both 16- and 32-bit installers. With 16-bit
installers getting really ancient compared to the newest version of
Windows, 64-bit versions of Vista/7 only permit 32- and 64-bit
installers.
It would also help a lot if we were told what the program the OP is
trying to install is as well as which version of Windows 7 he has. There
may be an updated version or a work around.

As you say, though, sometimes it just isn't worth the effort to support
old programs.
 
R

richard

And how is running the program on another partition going to do
anything different, bullis?

Perhaps it's best you not try to give computer advice, since you
obviously know nothing about computers.
Due to the way windows handles 64bit and 32bit.
The x86 folder is checked and certain action is taken based upon that.
Don't know why, but removing that program from the x86 folder bypasses that
action.

As an example, 40tude dialog has problems within the x86 folder.
Installed elsewhere, it's fine.
I normally install my programs on other partitions anyway.
 
E

Evan Platt

Due to the way windows handles 64bit and 32bit.
The x86 folder is checked and certain action is taken based upon that.
Don't know why, but removing that program from the x86 folder bypasses that
action.
Err what?

The OP is getting an error "The version of this file is not compatible
with the version of windows you're running. "

Installing to 'another partition' would make no difference.
As an example, 40tude dialog has problems within the x86 folder.
Bullshit. I installed it just fine to the x86 folder.
Installed elsewhere, it's fine.
I normally install my programs on other partitions anyway.
Good for you.
 
Ad

Advertisements

T

Tony

How'd you get on this newgroup?

Evan said:
Err what?

The OP is getting an error "The version of this file is not compatible
with the version of windows you're running. "

Installing to 'another partition' would make no difference.


Bullshit. I installed it just fine to the x86 folder.


Good for you.
--
The Grandmaster of the CyberFROG

Come get your ticket to CyberFROG city

Nay, Art thou decideth playeth ye simpleton games. *Some* of us know proper
manners

Very few. I used to take calls from *rank* noobs but got fired the first day on
the job for potty mouth,

Bur-ring, i'll get this one: WHAT'S YOUR PROBLEM JERK!!? We're here to help you
dickweed, ok, ok give the power cord the jiggily piggily wiggily all the while
pushing the power button repeatedly now take everything out of your computer
except the power supply and *one* stick of ram. Ok get the next sucker on the
phone.

Deirdre Straughan (Roxio) is a LIAR (Deirdre McFibber)

There's the employer and the employee and the FROGGER and the FROGEE, which one
are you?

Hamster isn't a newsreader it's a mistake!

El-Gonzo Jackson FROGS both me and Chuckcar (I just got EL-FROG-OED!!)

I hate them both, With useless bogus bullshit you need at least *three* fulltime
jobs to afford either one of them

I'm a fulltime text *only* man on usenet now. The rest of the world downloads
the binary files not me i can't afford thousands of dollars a month

VBB = Volume based billing. How many bytes can we shove down your throat and out
your arse sir?

UBB = User based bullFROGGING

Master Juba was a black man imitating a white man imitating a black man

Using my technical prowess and computer abilities to answer questions beyond the
realm of understandability

Regards Tony... Making usenet better for everyone everyday

This sig file was compiled via my journeys through usenet
 
T

Tim Slattery

Maurizio said:
Hello:
I tried to install an old software, which runs well under WIN XP, I got:
The version of this file is not compatible with the version of windows
you're running. Check your computer's system information to see whether
you need an x86(32bit) etc................
Most likely you're running the 64-bit version of Win7, and the program
that won't run is 16 bits. MS's 64-bit systems won't run 16-bit
programs.

You can contact the manufacturer of the program and see whether
there's a 32- or 64-bit version available. You can run a virtual
machine and run the 32-bit OS within it (if you're running XP
professional you can download a virtual 32-bit XP for free, I think).
If it's a command line program, you can try DOSBox (dosbox.com).
 
Y

Yousuf Khan

Thanks all
effectively, I'm using W7 64bits ultimate
Well, then you have the best situation. With W7 Ultimate, you are
allowed to run the "XP Mode" software, which emulates a full Windows XP
environment in a virtual machine under Windows 7. However, you may not
even need to go that far. You could try to run your older program under
W7 using the "Troubleshoot Compatibility" wizard, which is available for
all versions of W7, not just Ultimate.

Your best solution is to try to run the troubleshooting wizard, it'll
set up the program to think that it's running on a XP without requiring
the full virtualization. However, if this doesn't work, then you'll have
to try the virtualized XP Mode.

Yousuf Khan
 
S

Steve Hayes

Most likely you're running the 64-bit version of Win7, and the program
that won't run is 16 bits. MS's 64-bit systems won't run 16-bit
programs.
A couple of years ago I bought a laptop computer to replace one that had been
stolen. It came with 64-bit Windows 7 Home Premium installed, but had a DVD
with the 32-bit version. As soon as I got the message that the version was not
compatible, I installed the 32-bit version from the DVD.

I understand Windows 7 Professional and Ultimate 64-bit have a "compatibility
mode", but the "Home Premium" version doesn't, and since switching to the
32-bit version I've had no problems in running the programs I use every day.
 
T

TheGunslinger

Hello:
I tried to install an old software, which runs well under WIN XP, I got:
The version of this file is not compatible with the version of windows
you're running. Check your computer's system information to see whether
you need an x86(32bit) etc................

I tried to run it with win xp sp3 compatibility mode, I didn't succeed.

is there a solution for that?
it makes no sense to destroy backward compatibility, is this true?

thank you

There are three major versions of Windows 7: 32-bit (x86) and 64-bit
(x64) and IA64.

Also, you must have the Windows Professional versoional or better.

A lot of legacy software contains or is 16-bit based. Windows 7 64-bit
only supports 32-bit and 64-bit.

As a result, Windows 7 64-bit ONLY uses the latest version of
Microsoft Virtual PC.

HOWEVER, if you install Windows 7 32-bit, you can install Microsoft
Virtual PC 2007 for legacy OS's, you can install XP, Windows Millenium
and 98, AND MS-DOS 6.22.

If your legacy software ran under XP, it will probably run under
Windows 7 32-bit without installing a virtual pc OS.

Keep in mind, you MUST have the professional version of Windows 7 for
MS Virtual PC.

Hope this helps.

Respectfully,

MJR
 
Ad

Advertisements

J

J. P. Gilliver (John)

TheGunslinger said:
[]
it makes no sense to destroy backward compatibility, is this true?

thank you

There are three major versions of Windows 7: 32-bit (x86) and 64-bit
(x64) and IA64.
What is the third one - I mean, how does it differ from the other two?
[]
A lot of legacy software contains or is 16-bit based. Windows 7 64-bit
only supports 32-bit and 64-bit.
Why? I don't mean technically why - I'm sure you can tell me that
(incompatible file versions and so on), I just mean why was that
decision made? Like Maurizio, I am puzzled by it.
As a result, Windows 7 64-bit ONLY uses the latest version of
Microsoft Virtual PC.

HOWEVER, if you install Windows 7 32-bit, you can install Microsoft
Virtual PC 2007 for legacy OS's, you can install XP, Windows Millenium
and 98, AND MS-DOS 6.22.
In particular, that puzzles me. Even if there is some reason not to
support legacy software in the underlying OS, not supporting it via an
emulator seems a`_very_ odd decision, bordering on the vindictive!
[]
 
Z

Zaphod Beeblebrox

TheGunslinger said:
[]
it makes no sense to destroy backward compatibility, is this true?

thank you

There are three major versions of Windows 7: 32-bit (x86) and 64-bit
(x64) and IA64.
What is the third one - I mean, how does it differ from the other two?
[]
A lot of legacy software contains or is 16-bit based. Windows 7 64-bit
only supports 32-bit and 64-bit.
Why? I don't mean technically why - I'm sure you can tell me that
(incompatible file versions and so on), I just mean why was that
decision made? Like Maurizio, I am puzzled by it.
Likely, it was because the additional layer of code required to support
it was too much bloat (heh - now there's a thought, MS thinking a
feature might add too much bloat!), especially for the relatively few
users who actually need it.

That, or just wanting to make a cleaner break - legacy support is a
major impediment to future growth.
In particular, that puzzles me. Even if there is some reason not to
support legacy software in the underlying OS, not supporting it via an
emulator seems a`_very_ odd decision, bordering on the vindictive!
I think either MJR mis-spoke or you misunderstood.

Windows 7 64-bit Pro / Enterprise (and Ultimate, I think I forgot that
in earlier posts) all support XP mode, which runs a 32-bit version of
XP, which will run 16-bit and balky 32-bit software just fine. Also,
the latest version of MS Virtual PC can run XP 32-bit, with the same
capabilities.

Finally, if you are running a 32-bit version of Windows 7, you don't
need the emulator / virtual machine at all, it will run most XP-
compatible 32-bit and most 16-bit software just fine without an
emulator / virtual machine.
 
B

Brian Gregory [UK]

J. P. Gilliver (John) said:
TheGunslinger said:
[]
it makes no sense to destroy backward compatibility, is this true?

thank you

There are three major versions of Windows 7: 32-bit (x86) and 64-bit
(x64) and IA64.
What is the third one - I mean, how does it differ from the other two?
[]
A lot of legacy software contains or is 16-bit based. Windows 7 64-bit
only supports 32-bit and 64-bit.
Why? I don't mean technically why - I'm sure you can tell me that
(incompatible file versions and so on), I just mean why was that decision
made? Like Maurizio, I am puzzled by it.
As a result, Windows 7 64-bit ONLY uses the latest version of
Microsoft Virtual PC.

HOWEVER, if you install Windows 7 32-bit, you can install Microsoft
Virtual PC 2007 for legacy OS's, you can install XP, Windows Millenium
and 98, AND MS-DOS 6.22.
In particular, that puzzles me. Even if there is some reason not to
support legacy software in the underlying OS, not supporting it via an
emulator seems a`_very_ odd decision, bordering on the vindictive!
I think they are keen to push everyone on to 64bit as soon as possible.

In fact they could quite easily have enabled 32bit Windows to access over
4GB of RAM on systems using modern processors but chose not to do that
either.
 
Ad

Advertisements

S

Stan Brown

There are three major versions of Windows 7: 32-bit (x86) and 64-bit
(x64) and IA64.

Also, you must have the Windows Professional versoional or better.
If you want Windows 7's XP mode, yes.

However, there are third-party virtual machines that work fine in
Home Premium: VirtualBox and VMWare Player, or two. You should be
able to run legacy programs under those. I ran the 16-bit games from
the Windows [3.1] Entertainment Pack that way.
 

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top