Reactivation issue


B

Ben Williams

I am considering upgrading my motherboard from my socket AM2+/AM3 to a
socket AM3 only motherboard. The reason for the upgrade to to include
support for SATA III/6 Gbps drives and to upgrade to USB 3.0. I am
anticipating a reactivation will be necessary. The CPU I am using now is
AM3, so the only real components being upgraded will be the motherboard,
perhaps the hard drive, and the RAM. Am I entitled to a reaction if I make
these changes or will Microsoft say that I have in essence built a new
computer?
 
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B

Ben Williams

I meant am I entitled to a reactivation.

"Ben Williams" wrote in message

I am considering upgrading my motherboard from my socket AM2+/AM3 to a
socket AM3 only motherboard. The reason for the upgrade to to include
support for SATA III/6 Gbps drives and to upgrade to USB 3.0. I am
anticipating a reactivation will be necessary. The CPU I am using now is
AM3, so the only real components being upgraded will be the motherboard,
perhaps the hard drive, and the RAM. Am I entitled to a reaction if I make
these changes or will Microsoft say that I have in essence built a new
computer?
 
S

Seth

Ben Williams said:
I am considering upgrading my motherboard from my socket AM2+/AM3 to a
socket AM3 only motherboard. The reason for the upgrade to to include
support for SATA III/6 Gbps drives and to upgrade to USB 3.0. I am
anticipating a reactivation will be necessary. The CPU I am using now is
AM3, so the only real components being upgraded will be the motherboard,
perhaps the hard drive, and the RAM. Am I entitled to a reaction if I make
these changes or will Microsoft say that I have in essence built a new
computer?
You didn't say what type of license you have for your copy of Windows. If
OEM, no, legally the license is tied to the motherbaord it was originally
activated on. That's not to say a phone rep might overlook that, but you're
not entitled to it.
 
B

Bob I

Depends on whether you have a Retail version which is licensed to you,
or an OEM which is licensed to the computer.
 
P

Paul

Ben said:
I am considering upgrading my motherboard from my socket AM2+/AM3 to a
socket AM3 only motherboard. The reason for the upgrade to to include
support for SATA III/6 Gbps drives and to upgrade to USB 3.0. I am
anticipating a reactivation will be necessary. The CPU I am using now
is AM3, so the only real components being upgraded will be the
motherboard, perhaps the hard drive, and the RAM. Am I entitled to a
reaction if I make these changes or will Microsoft say that I have in
essence built a new computer?
Hardware-wise, you could get much the same effect from a U3S6 card.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813995004

You need a spare PCI Express x4 or larger slot, to fit that card.
And read the reviews, to see how well the card works. In terms
of price, it's pretty hard to beat (sometimes, a USB 3 card alone
cost more than that card).

Paul
 
C

Chuck

In essence you would have upgraded your computer and don't let anyone
tell you differently. Upgrading is permitted.
The age old activation/reactivation question again!
Anyway, OEM or not, replacing a motherboard usually does cause the
process to be toggled. It's no problem if a retail version of windows is
present. Generally, an OEM version is pre activated, and you can get
into problems. MS may say to go to the OEM that made the computer.

The usual way out is simply that a replacement motherboard is a
reasonable repair to an existing system. Seldom are new motherboards
identical to the original one.

In your case, if the MBD support chip set is the mostly the same, and
the BIOS is originally from the same source, and the processor is the
same, it's quite likely that you will have little or no trouble.
Since you want to upgrade the USB verson, I'd suspect that the support
chipset is not identical. It may be that the chipset family is close
enough, if the same mfr's chipset is used, and the MBD is from the same mfr.


Basically, I'd make a full backup of the system before I started, just
in case.
Although now retired, I once was a registered OEM/VAR, and
sold/supported OEM and retail versions. Usually, it's not a big problem
to do what you mention. Most problems occur when the original computer
was from one of the large OEM's, and a totally different MBD & processor
are involved.
 
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A

Alex Clayton

Ben Williams said:
I meant am I entitled to a reactivation.

"Ben Williams" wrote in message

I am considering upgrading my motherboard from my socket AM2+/AM3 to a
socket AM3 only motherboard. The reason for the upgrade to to include
support for SATA III/6 Gbps drives and to upgrade to USB 3.0. I am
anticipating a reactivation will be necessary. The CPU I am using now is
AM3, so the only real components being upgraded will be the motherboard,
perhaps the hard drive, and the RAM. Am I entitled to a reaction if I make
these changes or will Microsoft say that I have in essence built a new
computer?
I just went through this. Acer installed a new MB. After that the license
(OEM) would work for 30 days and quit. You can try calling them, and you
"may" get them to issue a new key, but my experience was no. If I had been
willing to spend untold time calling and complaining I may have gotten it,
but I was not willing to and just paid a C note for a new one.
Bottom line if you put a new MB in, you will have trouble. How much
trouble is hard to say, but it will not just work without hassle.
 
L

Leythos

I am considering upgrading my motherboard from my socket AM2+/AM3 to a
socket AM3 only motherboard. The reason for the upgrade to to include
support for SATA III/6 Gbps drives and to upgrade to USB 3.0. I am
anticipating a reactivation will be necessary. The CPU I am using now is
AM3, so the only real components being upgraded will be the motherboard,
perhaps the hard drive, and the RAM. Am I entitled to a reaction if I make
these changes or will Microsoft say that I have in essence built a new
computer?
According to licensing:

If your computer has OEM Windows installed, changing the motherboard
without doing so because of a motherboard failure is not permitted while
retaining the same license key. If you have OEM and the motherboard
fails, the vendor can replace the board with the same type or, if the
same is not available, they can replace it with a newer board and
reactivate - you can not re-activate if this is just an "Upgrade"
without failure.

If you have Retail you can upgrade anytime you want as long as you
remove the OS from the old computer - if upgrading just the motherboard,
if retail OS, you don't have to remove the OS because it's going to be
the same and not a second installed copy.

As for reactivation - many people reactivate in violation of the license
terms and have no issues. I have never had any issues reactivating any
version of MS's O/S - just say, reinstalling because of malware.
 
L

Leythos

You're wrong. There is no mention of a motherboard in the EULA for *any*
version of Windows. Where did you get that idea?
He's 100% right, and the proper word is "COMPUTER", and the OEM site
clearly defines COMPUTER as the MOTHERBOARD.
 
D

Doum

You didn't say what type of license you have for your copy of Windows. If
OEM, no, legally the license is tied to the motherbaord it was originally
activated on. That's not to say a phone rep might overlook that, but you're
not entitled to it.
Not true, the licence is tied to the COMPUTER, not the motherboard, the
motherboard is a part of the computer, not the computer.

What if the motherboard dies? You are allowed to replace it.

The OP keeps his processor, it could be considered the computer.

FWIW, the computer could be the case, after all the COA sticker is applied
to the case not the MB. I believe I can replace everything inside my case
and it's still the same computer.

To the OP, you might have to reinstall since there are other differences
than SATA and USB, usually a repair install is required.
 
L

Leythos

False, false, false. You don't even distinguish between a generic OEM
and a branded OEM and, again, the EULA makes no mention of a motherboard
and even less that a motherboard equals a computer. Not even the Windows
7 EULAs state what you state. Do you get a commission from MS for
fooling people? I have upgraded motherboards, called MS and told them
exactly what I did and they reactivated for me. I have also replaced the
same motherboard on a machine with an identical one and XP didn't bitch,
burp or fart.
As I said, this chart will prove the licensing claims by myself and
others, and disprove your claim:

http://i.zdnet.com/blogs/license-and-media-matrix.png?
tag=mantle_skin;content
 
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L

Leythos

Not true, the licence is tied to the COMPUTER, not the motherboard, the
motherboard is a part of the computer, not the computer.
You are wrong, technically - the defining component is the motherboard,
according to MS.
What if the motherboard dies? You are allowed to replace it.
If the MB dies you have always been permitted to replace it, and if you
have an OEM version the vendor is the place to start, the vendor is,
according to licensing rules, give you an exact replacement motherboard
and help you activate if necessary - if the exact replacement is not
available, the vendor can provide you with ANY motherboard, even if it's
a upgrade to what you use to have, as long as the board replaces a
failed one - again, the vendor is responsible for helping you activate
windows if needed.
The OP keeps his processor, it could be considered the computer.
The CPU has never been considered the "Computer".
FWIW, the computer could be the case, after all the COA sticker is applied
to the case not the MB. I believe I can replace everything inside my case
and it's still the same computer.
The case has never been considered the "Computer".
To the OP, you might have to reinstall since there are other differences
than SATA and USB, usually a repair install is required.
While mostly true, if not being done because of a failed motherboard,
legally it's not permitted with OEM versions.

http://i.zdnet.com/blogs/license-and-media-matrix.png?
tag=mantle_skin;content
 
L

Leythos

Pretty amateurish chart but no mention of a motherboard there either.
And you show that you can't follow information to the source, you can
only continue to troll.
 
D

Doum

You are wrong, technically - the defining component is the motherboard,
according to MS.


If the MB dies you have always been permitted to replace it, and if you
have an OEM version the vendor is the place to start, the vendor is,
according to licensing rules, give you an exact replacement motherboard
and help you activate if necessary - if the exact replacement is not
available, the vendor can provide you with ANY motherboard, even if it's
a upgrade to what you use to have, as long as the board replaces a
failed one - again, the vendor is responsible for helping you activate
windows if needed.


The CPU has never been considered the "Computer".


The case has never been considered the "Computer".


While mostly true, if not being done because of a failed motherboard,
legally it's not permitted with OEM versions.

http://i.zdnet.com/blogs/license-and-media-matrix.png?
tag=mantle_skin;content
Here's an extract of the user terms from Microsoft:

"b. License Model. Subject to Section 2 (b) below, the software is
licensed on a per copy per computer basis. A computer is a physical
hardware system with an internal storage device capable of running the
software. A hardware partition or blade is considered to be a separate
computer."

I don't see the word "motherboard" in there. That paragraph comes from
there:

http://download.microsoft.com/Documents/UseTerms/Windows 7_Home%
20Premium_English_a0cdb148-2381-47cd-bfc9-9b9102e0cb28.pdf
 
L

Leythos

Oh dear, Leythos is resorting to personal attacks again. Out of ammo so
quickly? LOL! Still waiting for the EULA that states one may not upgrade
to a new motherboard on the SAME machine. I'm not holding my breath
though, because, sport, I've done my homework and I know such an EULA
doesn't exist. The little chart you linked doesn't address this issue,
the issue at hand that you are trying to wiggle out of with a
condescending personal attack.
And you continue to deny the rules, but you can't prove your point, as
is always the case with you.
 
L

Leythos

Here's an extract of the user terms from Microsoft:

"b. License Model. Subject to Section 2 (b) below, the software is
licensed on a per copy per computer basis. A computer is a physical
hardware system with an internal storage device capable of running the
software. A hardware partition or blade is considered to be a separate
computer."

I don't see the word "motherboard" in there. That paragraph comes from
there:
What "Hardware System" do you think they mean?

It's not the power-supply, it's not the CD-Rom, it's not the cables, it
not the case - those things can NOT run the software.

Be honest this time.
 
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B

Boscoe

On 28/10/2010 7:04 PM, Alias wrote:>

....condescending personal attack.


Hypocrite
 
D

Doum

What "Hardware System" do you think they mean?
I don't know, they don't say!
It's not the power-supply, it's not the CD-Rom, it's not the cables, it
not the case - those things can NOT run the software.
The motherboard either cannot run the software without a CPU, memory and a
hard disk
Be honest this time.
I AM HONEST

As a "know-nothing" end-user that never goes to forums and don't know that
usenet exists, I consider that I'm only tied by the contract on the DVD
which is the same text than the link in my other post.

Again :

http://download.microsoft.com/Documents/UseTerms/Windows 7_Home%
20Premium_English_a0cdb148-2381-47cd-bfc9-9b9102e0cb28.pdf

Who am I (and who are you) to presume what they mean?
 
S

SomeOne

I have heard that the issue is with the BIOS. Widows 7 uses the bios "as
part of" its method of Registration. The bios is a chip on the Motherboard.
Therefore, if you change the motherboard without changing the chip back to
your old bios chip (which may or may not fit), you may have an issue.

This is my understanding... I can't prove it nor do I want to do the
research to figure it out....ha ha.

What's really silly is this.
Do the upgrade. if you have an issue, call ..and it will get fixed.
Microsoft has a number set up for this purpose.. to reactivate you system.
If your OS is a FAKE COPY from the Internet, then tough. Just buy a real
copy and it won't be an issue.

"Alias" wrote in message
And you continue to deny the rules, but you can't prove your point, as
is always the case with you.
Show me an EULA that says the motherboard is the computer and cannot be
upgraded. You can't because it doesn't exist. Game, set, match. You're a
liar, plain and simple and when caught, you always resort to
condescending personal attacks.
 
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S

Seth

SomeOne said:
I have heard that the issue is with the BIOS. Widows 7 uses the bios "as
part of" its method of Registration. The bios is a chip on the
Motherboard. Therefore, if you change the motherboard without changing the
chip back to your old bios chip (which may or may not fit), you may have
an issue.
Actually the portion of the activation code (being discussed) is tied to the
make/model hash of the motherboard combined with the serial number as
obtained via WMI calls. The makes up a portion of the 36 digit unique
identifier. All of the (major) components of the "system" make up this 36
digit identifier. Some larger portions than others. If too many change at
once, that sets off the reactivation scenario.

The part of the unique identifier specific to the motherboard is flagged in
the CRM system used by the CSRs who answer these calls at MS support
(usually in the India call center). The CSRs have the ability to make an
on-the-fly decision to over-ride this flag or not.
This is my understanding... I can't prove it nor do I want to do the
research to figure it out....ha ha.

What's really silly is this.
Do the upgrade. if you have an issue, call ..and it will get fixed.
And many CSRs, if you tell your tale "correctly" (say replaced motherboard
without using the "upgrade" word) will use the over-ride and everyone is
happy.
Microsoft has a number set up for this purpose.. to reactivate you system.
If your OS is a FAKE COPY from the Internet, then tough. Just buy a real
copy and it won't be an issue.
Nah, these guys just want to argue back and forth which is why despite being
one of the people to answer the original poster and thus set of a part of
this tirade have stayed out of it.

Regardless of how they think it should be or how they interpret the EULA
doesn't make a difference to what actually happens and how it gets resolved.
 

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