Put Windows7 on a brand new Windows 8 desktop?


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J

J. P. Gilliver (John)

I'd be interested to read an objective comparison of
8-plus-classic-shell to 7 - what is actually better, what is worse
(there must be some things). Trouble is, finding a truly objective
comparison is difficult: certainly if the reviewer has bought things
themselves, then there's the underlying
I-bought-it-so-will-look-an-idiot-if-I-diss-it-completely effect, even
if he thinks he's being objective - and conversely, the 7-lovers seem
mostly to be 8-haters almost on principle. (There, have I insulted
everyone enough, or is anyone still talking to me?)
I'm sure Microsoft is aware of the negative reaction to Windows 8. Why
I imagine they are by now, though to what extent they're aware (and, for
that matter, to what extent it actually exists, among the general public
rather than us here) we don't know.
would they make the next version less appealing"

Microsoft has to know that most people like an operating system like XP
If by that you mean they had to know before releasing 8 in its current
form, then arguably they didn't - either that or they weren't aiming it
at "most people" meaning existing computer users (who, arguably, weren't
likely to buy a new OS anyway, if they liked what they've got).
 
M

Mellowed

We are probably going to need a new computer soon, however, I tried out
the new Windows 8 on a spare laptop and have no interest in trying to
run a desktop with Windows 8. Since that seems to be the only option
out there right now, is it possible to install an older version of
Windows over a new one? I have done complete system restores before,
but that was with disks that either came with the computer or ones that
I made shortly after buying it. We have an unused copy of a Windows 7
upgrade, but have no idea if it would work on a Windows 8 machine. If
this is possible, could someone tell me just how to do this?
These folks have put together four different systems per my specs. 3
for others and one for me.
http://www.magicmicro.com/pricelist.asp?cid=364 You define your
components and they put together and test before shipping to you. They
give you a 3 year component warranty and life time technical support.
You also get an original MS OS disk. All have been perfect. If you
order through EBAY you'll also get free shipping.

I sure that there must be other similar houses, but these are the guys
I'm familiar with. Forget the HP's, Dell, ACER or equiv. Just get
exactly what you want, all tested, delivered to your front door and tax
free (provided you don't live in OH).
 
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J

J. P. Gilliver (John)

Ken Blake said:
Classic Shell is a good choice, but even better is Start8 (not free,
but almost--only $4.99 US) at http://www.stardock.com/products/start8/
I've seen several people say it's worth paying for (and, unlike Iceman,
I would be willing to pay - at least this sort of sum! for such a
utility, but probably only if I could try it first - which I see I can
for 30 days).

I've had a look at the website (and smiled at it being pronounced
"stardate" in the video - though I think he's just an American, not a
trekkie).

What I would like to see is some explanation from someone like yourself
(I presume from your statement that you have actually tried both
stardate and classic shell) of _why_ you find stardate better.

(Myself, I've only had the opportunity to play with Classic Shell for
about 10 minutes, on someone else's Windows 8 computer. One of the
things I liked about it was it offering at least three appearances for
the start menu: I think they were XP, Vista, and 7. In the video on the
stardate website, I only saw mention of the 7 one - and the fact that
you can play with its colours.)
 
K

Ken Blake

Still, I wouldn't pay for such an app.

Your choice of course. But to me, $5 is so little that it's
inconsequential.

And, as I said, Classic Shell is also a good choice--just not quite as
good.

And anyway I'm glad I stuck to Win7 for my new computer.

Again, your choice.
 
K

Ken Blake

What I would like to see is some explanation from someone like yourself
(I presume from your statement that you have actually tried both
stardate and classic shell) of _why_ you find stardate better.

Yes, I've tried both. But...

.... if I could remember, I would tell you, but I can't remember the
details of Classic Shell any more and what I liked better about
Start8, and ...

....regardless of what I liked better about it, you should try both
yourself and make your own decision about which *you* like better
 
M

Mellowed

I've seen several people say it's worth paying for (and, unlike Iceman,
I would be willing to pay - at least this sort of sum! for such a
utility, but probably only if I could try it first - which I see I can
for 30 days).

I've had a look at the website (and smiled at it being pronounced
"stardate" in the video - though I think he's just an American, not a
trekkie).

What I would like to see is some explanation from someone like yourself
(I presume from your statement that you have actually tried both
stardate and classic shell) of _why_ you find stardate better.

(Myself, I've only had the opportunity to play with Classic Shell for
about 10 minutes, on someone else's Windows 8 computer. One of the
things I liked about it was it offering at least three appearances for
the start menu: I think they were XP, Vista, and 7. In the video on the
stardate website, I only saw mention of the 7 one - and the fact that
you can play with its colours.)
I don't remember exactly why I preferred Start8. But I do remember that
I disliked the program menu as it was a Win 95 or Win 98 style. For $5
it wasn't worth being dissatisfied with anything. But, each to his own.
Makes no difference.
 
J

J. P. Gilliver (John)

Ken Blake said:
Yes, I've tried both. But...

... if I could remember, I would tell you, but I can't remember the
details of Classic Shell any more and what I liked better about
Start8, and ...

...regardless of what I liked better about it, you should try both
yourself and make your own decision about which *you* like better
Good advice (-:! (I suppose I was just looking for things to look out
for.) Academic anyway - I've no intention of buying a new PC for some
time, if this (an XP netbook!) continues, as it seems likely to.
 
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L

Lee Waun

Alias said:
And your wallet will have less money.


I liked XP. I didn't like Vista. I like 7. I'm not into tablets or
smartphones and, if I were, it would be Android, not Windows 8. If Windows
9 is like 8, I will go with Linux all the way.
+1
 
L

Lemon

Yes, I've tried both. But...

... if I could remember, I would tell you, but I can't remember the
details of Classic Shell any more and what I liked better about
Start8, and ...

...regardless of what I liked better about it, you should try both
yourself and make your own decision about which *you* like better
Stardock's Start8 solution, at least out of the box, matches the look
and feel of Windows 8 more closely than Classic Shell.

And Start8 enables you to have the whole Metro start page show up on the
desktop as a Start Menu.

Classic Shell enables granular control of pop up speed and other
animations etc. - which is great - and provides XP / Vista / 7 type
Start Menus.

Both solutions are nice. Both enable you to change the look of the Start
Button.

Both offer some interesting features the other doesn't.

I would recommend both. StarDock's Start8 has a 30 day trial. If a body
likes it, then it's easily, easily worth the 5 bucks. As a matter of
fact, I've bought the whole Stardock Object Desktop (49 bucks). Classic
Shell is free.

Lemon
 
J

J. P. Gilliver (John)

Lemon said:
[]
Stardock's Start8 solution, at least out of the box, matches the look
and feel of Windows 8 more closely than Classic Shell. (Did you _mean_ 8 there?)

And Start8 enables you to have the whole Metro start page show up on
the desktop as a Start Menu.

Classic Shell enables granular control of pop up speed and other
animations etc. - which is great - and provides XP / Vista / 7 type
Start Menus.
(That's what I liked about it, but I only had about 10-20 minutes of an
8 machine to try it on.)
Both solutions are nice. Both enable you to change the look of the
Start Button.

Both offer some interesting features the other doesn't.
Thanks for that summary.
I would recommend both. StarDock's Start8 has a 30 day trial. If a body
likes it, then it's easily, easily worth the 5 bucks. As a matter of
fact, I've bought the whole Stardock Object Desktop (49 bucks). Classic
Shell is free.
Sounds like a good plan. Agreed, something like that, if even half way
good, is worth such a low price. So if I ever get an 8 (or 7) machine, I
may well get both.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)Ar@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

The hypothalamus is one of the most important parts of the brain, involved in
many kinds of motivation, among other functions. The hypothalamus controls the
"Four F's": fighting, fleeing, feeding, and mating. -Heard in a neuropsychology
classroom
 
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L

Lemon

We are probably going to need a new computer soon, however, I tried out
the new Windows 8 on a spare laptop and have no interest in trying to
run a desktop with Windows 8. Since that seems to be the only option
out there right now, is it possible to install an older version of
Windows over a new one? I have done complete system restores before,
but that was with disks that either came with the computer or ones that
I made shortly after buying it. We have an unused copy of a Windows 7
upgrade, but have no idea if it would work on a Windows 8 machine. If
this is possible, could someone tell me just how to do this?

Yes, the Windows 7 Upgrade disc can be used to do a "clean" install of
Windows.

You would have to do a clean installation of Windows 7 (wipes everything
on the installation partition).

You cannot do an "upgrade" install of Windows 7 over Windows 8, keeping
your setting etc. The Windows 7 upgrade installer balks. But, as said,
you can do a "clean" install of Windows 7 on the machine with the
Upgrade disc.

When using the Upgrade disc to do a clean install, Windows knows you did
when it goes to activate .. and won't. And Windows 7 has to activate or
it will embarrass you :eek:) , so read this:

[Clean Install Windows 7 With Upgrade Media and Product Key on Formatted
or Empty Blank Hard Drive]

http://www.mydigitallife.info/clean-install-windows-7-with-upgrade-media-and-product-key-on-formatted-or-empty-blank-hard-drive/

Check workaround # 3. It's worked for me.

Make sure to download and burn to DVD-R or USB stick all the drivers you
need for that particular computer and planned installation.

Make sure to have all product keys available.

A caveat now-a-days is UEFI. You might have to go into the BIOS and turn
off any lock (usually called "secure boot" which ties the motherboard to
Windows 8).

Note: if you change your mind and decide just to keep the Windows 8
installation already there, you might have to turn secure boot back on
to boot the computer up.

Unless there's some particular incompatibility, all should go well.

Boot from the Windows 7 Upgrade disc.
Select Install Now.
Agree to the licensing terms.
Select Custom (advanced).
Choose the partition/drive where it's to install on.
Click Next .. and away it goes ..

So that's a general outline of how you install Windows 7 clean with the
upgrade disc.

Lemon
 
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