Problem with McAfee Internet Security


H

Hc

I am having some problems loading (and hence uninstalling) McAfee
Internet security from my PC. When I try to load up McAfe, I am
presented simply with an unresponsive white rectangle the same size as
what the program would be. This cannot be closed without going to the
task manager. The same rectangle appears when I go to uninstall programs
in the control panel and try to remove the program, which is what I
would like to do.

Can anyone help me out here?

Thanks.
 
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K

Ken

Hc said:
I am having some problems loading (and hence uninstalling) McAfee
Internet security from my PC. When I try to load up McAfe, I am
presented simply with an unresponsive white rectangle the same size as
what the program would be. This cannot be closed without going to the
task manager. The same rectangle appears when I go to uninstall programs
in the control panel and try to remove the program, which is what I
would like to do.

Can anyone help me out here?

Thanks.
Have you tried the tool from McAfee?

http://service.mcafee.com/FAQDocument.aspx?id=TS101331

You might also try doing this in Safe Mode.
 
K

Ken1943

I am having some problems loading (and hence uninstalling) McAfee
Internet security from my PC. When I try to load up McAfe, I am
presented simply with an unresponsive white rectangle the same size as
what the program would be. This cannot be closed without going to the
task manager. The same rectangle appears when I go to uninstall programs
in the control panel and try to remove the program, which is what I
would like to do.

Can anyone help me out here?

Thanks.
Adding to Ken, a reinstall over the top may also fix it.


KenW
 
D

Dominique

Ken said:
Have you tried the tool from McAfee?

http://service.mcafee.com/FAQDocument.aspx?id=TS101331

You might also try doing this in Safe Mode.
According to this page, the application must be uninstall using Windows
Control panel before using the tool. This tool will cleanup the registry,
remove all activation infos and what the regular uninstall has left.

Trying to uninstall in Safe mode is a good idea.
 
J

Johnny

I am having some problems loading (and hence uninstalling) McAfee
Internet security from my PC. When I try to load up McAfe, I am
presented simply with an unresponsive white rectangle the same size as
what the program would be. This cannot be closed without going to the
task manager. The same rectangle appears when I go to uninstall programs
in the control panel and try to remove the program, which is what I
would like to do.

Can anyone help me out here?

Thanks.
I don't know how McAfee works, but Avast has a protection module, and it
has to be disabled in order to uninstall it. It's located under
troubleshooting in Avast.

I also read that your problem is caused by a corrupted browser. Delete
your profile, and uninstall the browser and see if this corrects the
problem.
 
H

Hc

Have you tried the tool from McAfee?

http://service.mcafee.com/FAQDocument.aspx?id=TS101331

You might also try doing this in Safe Mode.

Thanks a lot to all of you for the replies. The McAfee Consumer Products
Removal Tool did the trick in the end. Removing McAfee first from the
control panel only appears to be an issue if you wish to reinstall and
continue using the software, which I don't. I've now replaced McAfee
with a security package from my new ISP, which would not install until
McAfee was removed from my machine.

Thanks again for all the replies.
 
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K

Ken Blake

Thanks a lot to all of you for the replies. The McAfee Consumer Products
Removal Tool did the trick in the end. Removing McAfee first from the
control panel only appears to be an issue if you wish to reinstall and
continue using the software, which I don't. I've now replaced McAfee
with a security package from my new ISP, which would not install until
McAfee was removed from my machine.

Removing McAfee was good. It's one of the poorest choices available.
But what did you replace it with? Generally what ISPs provide are not
good choices either.
 
H

Hc

Removing McAfee was good. It's one of the poorest choices available.
But what did you replace it with? Generally what ISPs provide are not
good choices either.
The service is provided by Trend Micro. Any good?
 
K

Ken Blake

The service is provided by Trend Micro. Any good?

I have no experience with it, and can't be sure how good it is. But as
far as I know, although it's not one of the best, it isn't terrible
either--much better than Norton or McAfee.

Here are my standard recommendations:

For an anti-virus program, I recommend eSet NOD32, if you are willing
to pay for it. If you want a free anti-virus, I recommend one (do not
run more than one antivirus program) of the following three:

Avira AntiVir
Avast
Microsoft Security Essentials

You also need anti-spyware software (even if you run a program like
Microsoft Security Essentials, with anti-spyware capability built into
it). So I recommend that you download and install (freeware)
MalwareBytes AntiMalware
 
P

Paul

Hc said:
The service is provided by Trend Micro. Any good?
There is a chart here, summarizing test results. Use the menu items at
the top, to change the bar chart type. Holding the mouse over a bar,
gives the name of the AV.

http://chart.av-comparatives.org/chart1.php

That site also used to produce PDF files with the same info.
So there are options for information, besides the chart.

They have a number of test cases, such as "retroactive test",
where the tool is checked to see if it picks up old malware.
Or tests where new ones are offered, to check heuristic or
behavioral detection. For example, some products are just
"signature checkers" and don't look at the behavior of
executables at all.

There is a chart there for "performance" or "impact", which
presumably is a measure of how much system resources are used.
But I doubt that chart actually tracks "annoying", which is a
subjective metric. One of the ones that rates well on
"performance", is an annoying product. So in that respect,
the charts may not give sufficient warning.

Paul
 
A

Anne

I have no experience with it, and can't be sure how good it is. But as
far as I know, although it's not one of the best, it isn't terrible
either--much better than Norton or McAfee.

Here are my standard recommendations:

For an anti-virus program, I recommend eSet NOD32, if you are willing
to pay for it. If you want a free anti-virus, I recommend one (do not
run more than one antivirus program) of the following three:

Avira AntiVir
Avast
Microsoft Security Essentials

You also need anti-spyware software (even if you run a program like
Microsoft Security Essentials, with anti-spyware capability built into
it). So I recommend that you download and install (freeware)
MalwareBytes AntiMalware
Eset is a good product. I bought a single computer licence 2 years ago
and there are at least 12 people/computers using my password etc. with
narry a peep from Eset. So only buy a single licence and save some
bucks!
 
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G

Gene E. Bloch

Eset is a good product. I bought a single computer licence 2 years ago
and there are at least 12 people/computers using my password etc. with
narry a peep from Eset. So only buy a single licence and save some
bucks!
Shoplifting is also a good way to save some bucks, in such areas as
clothing, food, and jewelry.
 
H

Hc

I have no experience with it, and can't be sure how good it is. But as
far as I know, although it's not one of the best, it isn't terrible
either--much better than Norton or McAfee.

Here are my standard recommendations:

For an anti-virus program, I recommend eSet NOD32, if you are willing
to pay for it. If you want a free anti-virus, I recommend one (do not
run more than one antivirus program) of the following three:

Avira AntiVir
Avast
Microsoft Security Essentials

You also need anti-spyware software (even if you run a program like
Microsoft Security Essentials, with anti-spyware capability built into
it). So I recommend that you download and install (freeware)
MalwareBytes AntiMalware
Thanks for the recommendations. The Trend Micro service comprises
anti-malware, firewall booster, website checker and optional parental
controls.

Is it really worth paying for security software though? In 13 years of
internet use I don't think I've ever had a virus. It strikes me that so
long as one is reasonably streetwise when using the net, and avoids
adult sites, peer to peer and usenet binaries any risk is very low.
 
K

Ken Blake

Thanks for the recommendations.

You're welcome. Glad to help.

The Trend Micro service comprises
anti-malware, firewall booster, website checker and optional parental
controls.

I am almost always against suites of any kind of software. Just
because a company makes the best anti-virus program doesn't mean that
they also make the best anti-spyware. Similarly, just because
WordPerfect makes the best word processor (in my view) doesn't mean
that they also make the best spreadsheet (I think Microsoft's Excel is
better than WordPerfect's Quattro Pro).

So my recommendation is always to pick and choose, rather than go with
suites. Picking and choosing is more expensive when you are dealing
with Office software, but not really when you are dealing with
security software.

Is it really worth paying for security software though?

Paying for it isn't necessary. There are several good free choices.
See my recommendations above.

In 13 years of
internet use I don't think I've ever had a virus.

Consider your self lucky. In my view, your statement is like "Is it
necessary to wear a seatbelt? In 13 years of driving I don't think
I've ever had an accident."

It strikes me that so
long as one is reasonably streetwise when using the net, and avoids
adult sites, peer to peer and usenet binaries any risk is very low.

There's no question that you can lower the risk by doing as you do
(just as you can lower the risk of a car accident by driving
carefully). Even if you do use excellent security software, you can
never completely eliminate the risk, and practicing safe hex remains
very important.

But the risk is always there, and in my view, not protecting yourself
with good software is like playing with fire. You don't have to pay
for good security software, but even if you had to, you should do so.
 
D

Dave

You're welcome. Glad to help.




I am almost always against suites of any kind of software. Just because
a company makes the best anti-virus program doesn't mean that they also
make the best anti-spyware. Similarly, just because WordPerfect makes
the best word processor (in my view) doesn't mean that they also make
the best spreadsheet (I think Microsoft's Excel is better than
WordPerfect's Quattro Pro).

So my recommendation is always to pick and choose, rather than go with
suites. Picking and choosing is more expensive when you are dealing with
Office software, but not really when you are dealing with security
software.




Paying for it isn't necessary. There are several good free choices. See
my recommendations above.




Consider your self lucky. In my view, your statement is like "Is it
necessary to wear a seatbelt? In 13 years of driving I don't think I've
ever had an accident."




There's no question that you can lower the risk by doing as you do (just
as you can lower the risk of a car accident by driving carefully). Even
if you do use excellent security software, you can never completely
eliminate the risk, and practicing safe hex remains very important.

But the risk is always there, and in my view, not protecting yourself
with good software is like playing with fire. You don't have to pay for
good security software, but even if you had to, you should do so.
I have Trend Micro as a 15 month trial on a new machine. It seems to be
very good. I get a lot of warnings about dangerous sites some of which I'm
certain aren't, but at least you can ignore at your own risk.
The very best protection is an image backup. If you partition your system
into system and programs with a separate data partition, you don't even
have to backup the system drive all that often. I generally do it after a
bunch of windows updates or if I've installed new software.
Keeping your data stuff current is fairly painless. I use a large flash
drive for day to day on data that gets changed frequently in conjunction
with a external HD.
When the Trend Micro trial runs out I'll go back to MS Esentials. I also
run ad-adaware.
 
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A

Anthony Buckland

Removing McAfee was good. It's one of the poorest choices available.
But what did you replace it with? Generally what ISPs provide are not
good choices either.
I use Zone Alarm. I like its efficiency and the way it
reports its activities and offers me options to deal
with things it suspects of possible danger.

Security and backup are two utility areas where I never mind
spending good money.
 
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