New Build Advice?


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I've been planning/researching my FIRST new build! I'd like to hear your thoughts, advice, doe it all sound compatible? Here's the blueprint;

Case - Corsair Obsidian 550D
PSU - Corsair AX760 80 Plus Platinum Fully Modular
CPU - Intel core i5 3570K 3.4 GB
Mother Board - Asus P8Z77-V Pro
Air Cooler - Cooler Master Hyper 212 Evo
RAM - Corsair Vengeance 8GB 2x4 DDR3 1600
HD - 2 x WD Caviar Black 1TB each
Video Card - Asus Radeon 7770
Optical Drive - Asus DVD/CD Rewriter 24B1st

I won't be overclocking this computer, so hopefully the Hyper 212 will provide the necessary cooling for the CPU.

So whats the verdict?
 
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yodap

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Looks good DD.

Hyper 212 is fine even if OC'ing.
The 1 thing I don't see is an SSD for the system drive. I don't have one either but my next build will.
Other than that, Have fun with it!

Oh yeah, W7 or W8?????:dontknow::)
 
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Looks good DD.

Hyper 212 is fine even if OC'ing.
The 1 thing I don't see is an SSD for the system drive. I don't have one either but my next build will.
Other than that, Have fun with it!

Oh yeah, W7 or W8?????:dontknow::)


Thanks yodap, and it will definitely be W7! ;)
Yeah I know a lot of people are beginning to use those SSDs and I know they're faster than the standard HD, but if it's just on the system drive and everything else is on your other HD, does it still make that much difference?
 
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yodap

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I can only tell you what I've heard, which is, people say they are noticeably faster. I think the prices are coming down enough for me to try one on the next build.
 

Digerati

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I won't be overclocking this computer, so hopefully the Hyper 212 will provide the necessary cooling for the CPU.

So whats the verdict?
A couple of things.

You may not be aware, and for many enthusiasts it is not a concern, but it is important all readers understand that both Intel and AMD warranty their “retail” boxed versions of their CPUs that come with supplied heatsink fan assemblies as “a unit". Consequently, both Intel and AMD require the use of the supplied coolers with their CPUs and using any alternative cooling solution violates the terms of the CPU warranties.

Note I am just the messenger. If other readers have a problem, complain to Intel and AMD. But note they provide (less expensive) OEM versions of many of their CPUs without a cooler so you can choose your own aftermarket cooling solution. But also note those CPUs are warrantied for just 1 year. This IS stated in the CPU warranty booklets that come with each CPU, or can be viewed online at Intel and AMD. While Intel's legalese is less clear, it does say the CPU and supplied cooler must be installed together as "a unit" as per the installation instructions. AMD's warranty language is crystal clear:
"This Limited Warranty shall be null and void if the AMD microprocessor which is the subject of this Limited Warranty is used with any heatsink/fan other than the one provided herewith."

The good news is, in spite of what others may tell you, the supplied AMD and Intel coolers are excellent coolers, more than capable of keeping the CPUs in their charge adequately cooled even with mild to moderate overclocking. And today's OEM coolers are much quieter than older OEMs too. Remember - it is the case's responsibility to provide sufficient cool air flow through the case. The CPU fan need only toss the CPU's heat into that flow. And with lots of cool air being supplied by the case cooling, the CPU fan will not need to run at full speed - so noise is rarely a problem. PSU and GPU fans (with their close proxity to the case exterior) tend to be much noisier.

So, if your 3-year warranty is a concern, stick with the OEM cooler. They work just fine and will be more than adequate for you and that fine Corsair case.
***

I don't see an operating system listed. A common mistake is some users assume they can use their old Windows license on a new computer or when upgrading their motherboards. Understand only a "boxed" full Retail license can be transferred to a new computer (or upgraded motherboard). It is illegal to use an OEM license that came with or was purchased for one computer on another computer. A disk “branded” with a computer maker’s brand name, or is labeled with “OEM/System Builder”, “Upgrade”, “Academic Edition”, or "For Distribution with a new PC only", is not transferable to a new PC (or upgraded motherboard) under any circumstances. These OEM licenses are inextricably tied to the "original equipment". So if that is the case, I recommend 64-bit Windows 7 or Windows 8, or one of the many free Linux alternatives. Just ensure it is 64-bit since you have selected 8Gb of RAM. Note I am just the messenger stating the facts here too. This is all in the EULAs we agree to abide by when we first use our OEM software on the original equipment.
 
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I know I said I was getting the I5 3570K, but I couldn't help myself.......I bought
the I7 3770K instead. :D
 

Digerati

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It's kinda like buying that big V8 in your next car instead of the more economical V6. You don't need the V8, but it sure is fun to whomp on it - at least until it comes time to fill up the tank.

But that's where the difference ends because both processors have a TDP of 77w. So the i7 will cost you more up front, but you will not have to keep paying through the nose at the pump over the life of the CPU.

Of course for the vast majority of the time you will never use those extra horses, but at least they are there when you want to take them out for a run.
 
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It's kinda like buying that big V8 in your next car instead of the more economical V6. You don't need the V8, but it sure is fun to whomp on it - at least until it comes time to fill up the tank.

But that's where the difference ends because both processors have a TDP of 77w. So the i7 will cost you more up front, but you will not have to keep paying through the nose at the pump over the life of the CPU.

Of course for the vast majority of the time you will never use those extra horses, but at least they are there when you want to take them out for a run.

Exactly! :D

I don't expect to be doing this again for a while, so I figured I'd better do it right! LOL

Actually while I researched, planned and bought all the components for this computer myself, I finally decided to just build it on paper and let a pro build it on the bench.
Tried to sign up for a "Build your own" class at MicroCenter but discovered I was too late.
Anyway I learned a lot from all the research and I enjoyed doing it. ;)
I managed to find a guy I trust with it and he'll have it done in a day or two.
 
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Digerati

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On two of those first steps are for you to (1) setup your security and (2) create a backup of your drive.
 
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Done deal Dig. I used Windows Backup to create 2 system images, 1 on each of my 2 HDDs just to be on the safe side.
She's up and runnin, and her 1st words were "Da Da"! :D
 
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Digerati

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Now all you need to do is keep it updated, use a decent anti-malware solution (I use MSE and Windows Firewall) and avoid risky behavior like illegal filesharing via torrents and P2P sites.
 

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