laptop processor power management settings


Y

Yousuf Khan

My laptop when it's sitting on my lap while on batteries seems
relatively comfortable and cool, but when the same laptop is plugged
into the wall mains, it's too hot. I looked at the Advanced Settings of
Power Management, and it is set to a Minimum Processor State of 5% on
both batteries and while plugged in, and its Maximum Processor State is
similarly set to 100% in both cases. So theoretically, the processor
should behave identically when in either mode. But it definitely feels
cooler when running on batteries. It seems that it probably runs at 100%
more often when on power, than when on battery. What I want it to do is
run as coolly when plugged in, as it does when on batteries. Is there
any other settings responsible for a difference between battery- and
wall-powered states?

The machine is a Toshiba Satellite L745D, running an AMD A6-3400M
processor.

Yousuf Khan
 
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G

Gene E. Bloch

My laptop when it's sitting on my lap while on batteries seems
relatively comfortable and cool, but when the same laptop is plugged
into the wall mains, it's too hot. I looked at the Advanced Settings of
Power Management, and it is set to a Minimum Processor State of 5% on
both batteries and while plugged in, and its Maximum Processor State is
similarly set to 100% in both cases. So theoretically, the processor
should behave identically when in either mode. But it definitely feels
cooler when running on batteries. It seems that it probably runs at 100%
more often when on power, than when on battery. What I want it to do is
run as coolly when plugged in, as it does when on batteries. Is there
any other settings responsible for a difference between battery- and
wall-powered states?

The machine is a Toshiba Satellite L745D, running an AMD A6-3400M
processor.

Yousuf Khan
Not what you're asking, I admit. I buy a cheap clipboard, drill out the
rivets that hold the paper clamp, and use the resulting board as a
laptop holder when I have the computer on my lap. The result is that I
don't even care about the heat.

But actually, the reason I do it might be an answer to your question. I
do it because I believe that no matter how careful I am, if I put the
laptop directly on my lap, I will inadvertently partially block the air
vents (without even perceiving it), and thereby interfere with the
cooling.
 
C

charlie

Not what you're asking, I admit. I buy a cheap clipboard, drill out the
rivets that hold the paper clamp, and use the resulting board as a
laptop holder when I have the computer on my lap. The result is that I
don't even care about the heat.

But actually, the reason I do it might be an answer to your question. I
do it because I believe that no matter how careful I am, if I put the
laptop directly on my lap, I will inadvertently partially block the air
vents (without even perceiving it), and thereby interfere with the
cooling.
I have an older HP laptop that has the same problem. The solution was to
add one of the laptop coolers, or accept the high temperature and
shorter life.
 
J

Jason

On Sun, 27 Jan 2013 18:46:36 -0500 "Yousuf Khan" <bbbl67
@spammenot.yahoo.com> wrote in article said:
My laptop when it's sitting on my lap while on batteries seems
relatively comfortable and cool, but when the same laptop is plugged
into the wall mains, it's too hot. I looked at the Advanced Settings of
Power Management, and it is set to a Minimum Processor State of 5% on
both batteries and while plugged in, and its Maximum Processor State is
similarly set to 100% in both cases. So theoretically, the processor
should behave identically when in either mode. But it definitely feels
cooler when running on batteries. It seems that it probably runs at 100%
more often when on power, than when on battery. What I want it to do is
run as coolly when plugged in, as it does when on batteries. Is there
any other settings responsible for a difference between battery- and
wall-powered states?

The machine is a Toshiba Satellite L745D, running an AMD A6-3400M
processor.

Yousuf Khan
Applications are able to determine if the laptop is running on batteries
and change their behavior. Antivirus programs defer scanning when the
machine is battery powered, so do background defragmenters. Windows
obviously "knows" too, so I wonder if there are Win components that
throttle back when the machine's on battery. taskmgr might give some
clues.
 
S

SC Tom

Gene E. Bloch said:
Not what you're asking, I admit. I buy a cheap clipboard, drill out the
rivets that hold the paper clamp, and use the resulting board as a
laptop holder when I have the computer on my lap. The result is that I
don't even care about the heat.

But actually, the reason I do it might be an answer to your question. I
do it because I believe that no matter how careful I am, if I put the
laptop directly on my lap, I will inadvertently partially block the air
vents (without even perceiving it), and thereby interfere with the
cooling.
I like the plastic cutting boards they sell at Wallyworld. They "insulate"
even better than the clipboard, and are just as light.

When I was working, I took one of them into the machine shop and routed out
depressions for the foot pads, and drilled holes for good circulation where
air was pulled through. I had some old plastic fan grates that I fitted in
those holes so the bottom part on my lap was flush, and still allowed air
through. Gotta love a project :) (And they call me OC. Where does THAT come
from? :) )
 
S

SC Tom

Yousuf Khan said:
My laptop when it's sitting on my lap while on batteries seems relatively
comfortable and cool, but when the same laptop is plugged into the wall
mains, it's too hot. I looked at the Advanced Settings of Power
Management, and it is set to a Minimum Processor State of 5% on both
batteries and while plugged in, and its Maximum Processor State is
similarly set to 100% in both cases. So theoretically, the processor
should behave identically when in either mode. But it definitely feels
cooler when running on batteries. It seems that it probably runs at 100%
more often when on power, than when on battery. What I want it to do is
run as coolly when plugged in, as it does when on batteries. Is there any
other settings responsible for a difference between battery- and
wall-powered states?

The machine is a Toshiba Satellite L745D, running an AMD A6-3400M
processor.

Yousuf Khan
You can set your max CPU and GPU to a less than 100% number and see how it
performs. Like others have said, there are some programs that run more fully
on AC power than they do on DC. Like some AV programs; they'll run quick
scans on battery, but full scans on AC. You can turn your screen saver off
on AC, or just use blank screen. There are a number of other hardware
settings that will cool your laptop down, but may affect it's performance.
You'd have to do a little experimentation to find a happy balance.

How old is this laptop? Has it been cleaned out internally lately (if it's
more than 2 or 3)? I don't mean just blowing it out with a can of compressed
air; I mean broken down and cleaned.
 
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Y

Yousuf Khan

Not what you're asking, I admit. I buy a cheap clipboard, drill out the
rivets that hold the paper clamp, and use the resulting board as a
laptop holder when I have the computer on my lap. The result is that I
don't even care about the heat.
I do already have a laptop cooler, but I'm trying to get away from it.

Yousuf Khan
 
R

Rob

My laptop when it's sitting on my lap while on batteries seems
relatively comfortable and cool, but when the same laptop is plugged
into the wall mains, it's too hot. I looked at the Advanced Settings of
Power Management, and it is set to a Minimum Processor State of 5% on
both batteries and while plugged in, and its Maximum Processor State is
similarly set to 100% in both cases. So theoretically, the processor
should behave identically when in either mode. But it definitely feels
cooler when running on batteries. It seems that it probably runs at 100%
more often when on power, than when on battery. What I want it to do is
run as coolly when plugged in, as it does when on batteries. Is there
any other settings responsible for a difference between battery- and
wall-powered states?

The machine is a Toshiba Satellite L745D, running an AMD A6-3400M
processor.

Yousuf Khan

If you were to interrogate what the cpu is actually doing in each of the
modes the answer may lay there.

You can use something like Everest (free version at Geeks) and check the
CPU speed and temperatures.

http://www.majorgeeks.com/download4181.html
 
K

Kenny Cargill

Not related to the problem but there was a story recently in a national
newspaper about a couple who had been trying for years to conceive a child
with no success and the woman was about to start IVF treatment. Counsellor
was asking them lifestyle question and it emerged the husband regularly used
a laptop on his lap. It was suggested he stop doing this and his wife
became pregnant within 2 months!

Kenny Cargill

"Rob" wrote in message
My laptop when it's sitting on my lap while on batteries seems
relatively comfortable and cool, but when the same laptop is plugged
into the wall mains, it's too hot. I looked at the Advanced Settings of
Power Management, and it is set to a Minimum Processor State of 5% on
both batteries and while plugged in, and its Maximum Processor State is
similarly set to 100% in both cases. So theoretically, the processor
should behave identically when in either mode. But it definitely feels
cooler when running on batteries. It seems that it probably runs at 100%
more often when on power, than when on battery. What I want it to do is
run as coolly when plugged in, as it does when on batteries. Is there
any other settings responsible for a difference between battery- and
wall-powered states?

The machine is a Toshiba Satellite L745D, running an AMD A6-3400M
processor.

Yousuf Khan

If you were to interrogate what the cpu is actually doing in each of the
modes the answer may lay there.

You can use something like Everest (free version at Geeks) and check the
CPU speed and temperatures.

http://www.majorgeeks.com/download4181.html
 
C

Char Jackson

Not related to the problem but there was a story recently in a national
newspaper about a couple who had been trying for years to conceive a child
with no success and the woman was about to start IVF treatment. Counsellor
was asking them lifestyle question and it emerged the husband regularly used
a laptop on his lap. It was suggested he stop doing this and his wife
became pregnant within 2 months!
When that story first broke several years ago, men all over the civilized
world began using their laptops directly on their laps.
 
C

Char Jackson

My laptop when it's sitting on my lap while on batteries seems
relatively comfortable and cool, but when the same laptop is plugged
into the wall mains, it's too hot. I looked at the Advanced Settings of
Power Management, and it is set to a Minimum Processor State of 5% on
both batteries and while plugged in, and its Maximum Processor State is
similarly set to 100% in both cases. So theoretically, the processor
should behave identically when in either mode. But it definitely feels
cooler when running on batteries. It seems that it probably runs at 100%
more often when on power, than when on battery. What I want it to do is
run as coolly when plugged in, as it does when on batteries. Is there
any other settings responsible for a difference between battery- and
wall-powered states?

The machine is a Toshiba Satellite L745D, running an AMD A6-3400M
processor.
I've been casually following the discussion and it seems to me that if
everything is the same between battery-powered states and mains-powered
states, then the difference may lie in the heat generating qualities of the
AC->DC converter circuit and/or the battery charging system.
 
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Y

Yousuf Khan

I've been casually following the discussion and it seems to me that if
everything is the same between battery-powered states and mains-powered
states, then the difference may lie in the heat generating qualities of the
AC->DC converter circuit and/or the battery charging system.
That's an interesting point.

Yousuf Khan
 
Y

Yousuf Khan

If you were to interrogate what the cpu is actually doing in each of the
modes the answer may lay there.

You can use something like Everest (free version at Geeks) and check the
CPU speed and temperatures.

http://www.majorgeeks.com/download4181.html
Actually that's pretty much what I am already doing. I monitor the
temperature, CPU activity & RAM usage with the Core Temp desktop gadget.
I also monitor the disk activity with HD Sentinel's desktop gadget.

So using these monitors I have noticed that processor seems to run
cooler, but it doesn't seem like it's running any slower while on
batteries. While on power, the temps usually exceed 50C, but on battery,
it doesn't go much over the mid-40's.

Yousuf Khan
 
Y

Yousuf Khan

Not related to the problem but there was a story recently in a national
newspaper about a couple who had been trying for years to conceive a
child with no success and the woman was about to start IVF treatment.
Counsellor was asking them lifestyle question and it emerged the husband
regularly used a laptop on his lap. It was suggested he stop doing this
and his wife became pregnant within 2 months!

Kenny Cargill
Usually, when you go to fertility clinics, both partners are tested just
to make sure there aren't any hidden problems with either partner.

Besides, I'm not even putting my laptop that close in, I'm usually
leaving it up closer to my knees. :)

Yousuf Khan
 
R

Rob

Actually that's pretty much what I am already doing. I monitor the
temperature, CPU activity & RAM usage with the Core Temp desktop gadget.
I also monitor the disk activity with HD Sentinel's desktop gadget.

So using these monitors I have noticed that processor seems to run
cooler, but it doesn't seem like it's running any slower while on
batteries. While on power, the temps usually exceed 50C, but on battery,
it doesn't go much over the mid-40's.

Yousuf Khan

Its usual that the MB/cpu have a stepping arrangement have you checked that?
 
G

Gene E. Bloch

Not related to the problem but there was a story recently in a national
newspaper about a couple who had been trying for years to conceive a child
with no success and the woman was about to start IVF treatment. Counsellor
was asking them lifestyle question and it emerged the husband regularly used
a laptop on his lap. It was suggested he stop doing this and his wife
became pregnant within 2 months!

Kenny Cargill
At long last, I now know why I read these newsgroups :)

To be momentarily serious, I *am* surprised that there is enough heat
there[1] to have that effect.

[1] For certain values of "there".
 
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C

Char Jackson

Not related to the problem but there was a story recently in a national
newspaper about a couple who had been trying for years to conceive a child
with no success and the woman was about to start IVF treatment. Counsellor
was asking them lifestyle question and it emerged the husband regularly used
a laptop on his lap. It was suggested he stop doing this and his wife
became pregnant within 2 months!

Kenny Cargill
At long last, I now know why I read these newsgroups :)

To be momentarily serious, I *am* surprised that there is enough heat
there[1] to have that effect.

[1] For certain values of "there".
I have no way to verify it, but I've been told that the older a man gets,
the closer to his knees "there" becomes. So eventually, using a laptop on a
lap becomes a non-issue.
 

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