How to install XP on a Win7 system


W

wgd.roaming

Understand that Win 7 installed on an XP system works fine.

Have a new Lap with Win 7 - wud like to add XP to "service" older SW.

That said, if I upgrade a Win 7 Hm Pre to Win 7 Prof, it is said that
the Win 7 Prof supports XP (32bit) applications (not ready to buy
Quickbooks, for example). Then having, requiring two OS on same goes
away.

Is this true?

Thank You!

Wayne
 
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S

Seth

Understand that Win 7 installed on an XP system works fine.

Have a new Lap with Win 7 - wud like to add XP to "service" older SW.

That said, if I upgrade a Win 7 Hm Pre to Win 7 Prof, it is said that
the Win 7 Prof supports XP (32bit) applications (not ready to buy
Quickbooks, for example). Then having, requiring two OS on same goes
away.
If you go Pro you get "XP Mode" which is basically a pre-configured (and
licensed) copy of XP that runs as a VM (virtual machine). You can run 32
and 16 bit apps in that VM.

But Quickbooks (as per your example) should run as it is 32b and Win7-64
support most 32b software.
 
G

Gene E. Bloch

Understand that Win 7 installed on an XP system works fine.
Have a new Lap with Win 7 - wud like to add XP to "service" older SW.
That said, if I upgrade a Win 7 Hm Pre to Win 7 Prof, it is said that
the Win 7 Prof supports XP (32bit) applications (not ready to buy
Quickbooks, for example). Then having, requiring two OS on same goes
away.
Is this true?
Thank You!
I assume that you have a licensed copy of XP to install.

It's possibly easiest to install a virtual machine and install that
licensed copy of XP inside the VM (if you have Pro, then just take
Seth's advice).

For one thing, it becomes easy to share data between the host system
and the virtual (client) OS.

I use VMware Reader, which is free. There are others, free and not.
 
C

Char Jackson

If you go Pro you get "XP Mode" which is basically a pre-configured (and
licensed) copy of XP that runs as a VM (virtual machine). You can run 32
and 16 bit apps in that VM.

But Quickbooks (as per your example) should run as it is 32b and Win7-64
support most 32b software.
Agreed. To the OP, don't even consider dual booting until you try
Quickbooks and see for yourself that it won't run. I'm thinking it'll
install and run just fine without any tricks.
 
A

Andy

I have a 3 Os boot machine windows xp pro
windows 7 ultimate and ubuntu :)
 
T

TheGunslinger

If you go Pro you get "XP Mode" which is basically a pre-configured (and
licensed) copy of XP that runs as a VM (virtual machine). You can run 32
and 16 bit apps in that VM.

But Quickbooks (as per your example) should run as it is 32b and Win7-64
support most 32b software.

To run 16-bit legacy software requires Windows 7 Pro 32-bit plus MS
Virtual PC 2007.

Windows 7 Pro 64-bit only support the newest version of MS Virtual PC,
and supports 32-bit and 64-bit software only.

Hope this helps clarify the issues.

IMHO,

MJR
 
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Z

Zaphod Beeblebrox

To run 16-bit legacy software requires Windows 7 Pro 32-bit plus MS
Virtual PC 2007.
Not exactly - Windows 7 Pro 32-bit will run most 16-bit software just
fine. Windows 7 64-bit, however, will not and requires either XP Mode
(for Pro/Enterprise) or some other virtual machine, such as VMWare,
Virtual PC, etc. running a 32-bit version of Windows (or pure DOS, for
the hard-core).
Windows 7 Pro 64-bit only support the newest version of MS Virtual PC,
and supports 32-bit and 64-bit software only.
If you are saying that Windows 7 64-bit won't run 16-bit software
natively, that is correct. However, the version of XP Mode that comes
with Pro/Enterprise runs a 32-bit copy of XP so it is capable of
running 16-bit software. Same with MS Virtual PC, assuming a 32-bit
version of Windows is installed there of course.

--
Zaphod

"So, two heads is what does it for a girl?"
"...Anything else he's got two of?"
- Arthur Dent (to Trillian, about Zaphod)
 
G

Gene E. Bloch

On Thu, 12 Jan 2012 20:18:46 -0500, "Seth"


To run 16-bit legacy software requires Windows 7 Pro 32-bit plus MS
Virtual PC 2007.
Windows 7 Pro 64-bit only support the newest version of MS Virtual PC,
and supports 32-bit and 64-bit software only.
Hope this helps clarify the issues.

MJR
Perhaps the free emulators, which run on lower versions of Windows 7,
will support 16-bit programs.

I am running VMware player on Win 7 Pro x64 and was running it on Win 7
Home Premium x64, but I had and have no 16-bit software to test.

Caveat: officially, you must have a legitimate license for the older
version of the OS if you use VMware or its competitors.

Advantage: even on this 7 Pro system, I am happier with VMware and my
Win XP license than I was with XP Mode on Pro.
 
G

Gene E. Bloch

Perhaps the free emulators, which run on lower versions of Windows 7, will
support 16-bit programs.
I am running VMware player on Win 7 Pro x64 and was running it on Win 7 Home
Premium x64, but I had and have no 16-bit software to test.
Caveat: officially, you must have a legitimate license for the older version
of the OS if you use VMware or its competitors.
Advantage: even on this 7 Pro system, I am happier with VMware and my Win XP
license than I was with XP Mode on Pro.
And while I was typing the above, Zaphod Beeblebrox posted a reply
which gives more and better info on this subject.
 
Z

Zaphod Beeblebrox

Perhaps the free emulators, which run on lower versions of Windows 7,
will support 16-bit programs.

I am running VMware player on Win 7 Pro x64 and was running it on Win 7
Home Premium x64, but I had and have no 16-bit software to test.

Caveat: officially, you must have a legitimate license for the older
version of the OS if you use VMware or its competitors.

Advantage: even on this 7 Pro system, I am happier with VMware and my
Win XP license than I was with XP Mode on Pro.
Gene, what is it about VMWare that you like better than XP Mode? I've
been meaning to give VMWare a try, but haven't had that "killer
feature" moment to compel me to do so.
 
G

Gene E. Bloch

Gene, what is it about VMWare that you like better than XP Mode? I've
been meaning to give VMWare a try, but haven't had that "killer
feature" moment to compel me to do so.
I made the decision a while ago, but I'll try to recall all that went
into it.

First, the need: I own three old programmable remote controls, none of
them supported in Windows 7 x64. These are two Philips Pronto remotes,
TSU3500 and TSU7000, and a Universal Remote Aurora MX-950. I have no
idea if they would work in x86.

The non-starter: I could only get one or two of them to work in XP
Mode, but I forgot which ones.

Another thing I found is that VMware worked more smoothly and easily
for me, but I can't remember the exact perceptions now. IIRC, some of
it had to do with file access between the host and the client machines.
Other parts of it were just responsiveness, boot times, that kind of
thing.

Since I have a valid XP Home license, it was no extra expense to go to
a non-Windows VM.

Another oddity. I have a Harmony 300 which I bought a little while ago
- it was a cheap way to see how I like that line of products, with an
eye to replacing the above stuff with the Harmony One. It turns out
that Logitech, in their very finite wisdom, do not seem to support
running their web software in IE or FF under Win 7 x64 (and I see on
their forums that others have this problem, and have had it even longer
than I have). So I have to program the 300 in the VM as well :-(

BTW, I sent a support query to Logitech on the issue mentioning the
above problem, as well as another Logitech remote control SW product
that didn't work in W7. The tech told me that the other SW product is
not supposed to be for the 300, and said I should try the browser
method...even though I told him in my query that it didn't work. I told
him that and asked for more help. I am growing old waiting for a
further reply.

So I'm stuck with using the VM, even though the only problem I have
right now is the one with the collection of remote controls.

If you need any more excess verbiage from me that might help, just ask
:)
 
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R

Roy Smith

I made the decision a while ago, but I'll try to recall all that went
into it.

First, the need: I own three old programmable remote controls, none of
them supported in Windows 7 x64. These are two Philips Pronto remotes,
TSU3500 and TSU7000, and a Universal Remote Aurora MX-950. I have no
idea if they would work in x86.

The non-starter: I could only get one or two of them to work in XP Mode,
but I forgot which ones.

Another thing I found is that VMware worked more smoothly and easily for
me, but I can't remember the exact perceptions now. IIRC, some of it had
to do with file access between the host and the client machines. Other
parts of it were just responsiveness, boot times, that kind of thing.

Since I have a valid XP Home license, it was no extra expense to go to a
non-Windows VM.

Another oddity. I have a Harmony 300 which I bought a little while ago -
it was a cheap way to see how I like that line of products, with an eye
to replacing the above stuff with the Harmony One. It turns out that
Logitech, in their very finite wisdom, do not seem to support running
their web software in IE or FF under Win 7 x64 (and I see on their
forums that others have this problem, and have had it even longer than I
have). So I have to program the 300 in the VM as well :-(

BTW, I sent a support query to Logitech on the issue mentioning the
above problem, as well as another Logitech remote control SW product
that didn't work in W7. The tech told me that the other SW product is
not supposed to be for the 300, and said I should try the browser
method...even though I told him in my query that it didn't work. I told
him that and asked for more help. I am growing old waiting for a further
reply.

So I'm stuck with using the VM, even though the only problem I have
right now is the one with the collection of remote controls.

If you need any more excess verbiage from me that might help, just ask :)
One of the good things about VMware is that if you're using Win7 Pro you
don't need a separately licensed copy of WinXP. VMWare will use the
XPMode virtual hard drive file and create a copy that it can use. Of
course this means that you'd have to install XPMode to begin with, but
in the long run it's much better running it in VMWare instead.

What I like about using VMWare over XPMode is that copying files is as
simple as drag and drop, couldn't get any easier than that. Another
thing is having the VM in Unity mode as any programs you have running in
the VM appear on your desktop as if Win7 was running it itself.


--

Roy Smith
Windows 7 Home Premium 64-Bit
Thunderbird 9.0.1
Tuesday, January 17, 2012 8:44:08 PM
 
S

Seth

TheGunslinger said:
To run 16-bit legacy software requires Windows 7 Pro 32-bit plus MS
Virtual PC 2007.
So? Did I says otherwise? I specifically said 32b should be fine on x64. It
wasn't until a later post, not even quoted in what you are responding to
that the OP even mentioned the specific version of QB in question. My only
error was in not assuming how ancient a version of QB was being used.
Windows 7 Pro 64-bit only support the newest version of MS Virtual PC,
and supports 32-bit and 64-bit software only.
As someone who is currently engineering the rollout and design of MED-V to
70,000 seats I am quite well aware of the capabilities and limitations of
VPC and it's variants.
Hope this helps clarify the issues.
I guess that all depends on what issues you think you are clarifying.
 
S

Seth

Seth said:
So? Did I says otherwise? I specifically said 32b should be fine on x64.
It wasn't until a later post, not even quoted in what you are responding
to that the OP even mentioned the specific version of QB in question. My
only error was in not assuming how ancient a version of QB was being used.
oh, and I think you should have said "Requires Windows 7 Pro (or other
variant) ***OR*** VPC 2007". No need for VPC if the host OS is already 32b
to run 16b software.
 
S

Seth

Zaphod Beeblebrox said:
Gene, what is it about VMWare that you like better than XP Mode? I've
been meaning to give VMWare a try, but haven't had that "killer
feature" moment to compel me to do so.
It's more robust with better support for "other" operating systems. The
downside to using VMWare (or any other VM system) is you have to bring your
own XP license with you. XP-Mode comes with 1 included in the cost of Pro or
Ultimate.
 
G

Gene E. Bloch

One of the good things about VMware is that if you're using Win7 Pro you
don't need a separately licensed copy of WinXP. VMWare will use the
XPMode virtual hard drive file and create a copy that it can use. Of
course this means that you'd have to install XPMode to begin with, but
in the long run it's much better running it in VMWare instead.
What I like about using VMWare over XPMode is that copying files is as
simple as drag and drop, couldn't get any easier than that. Another
thing is having the VM in Unity mode as any programs you have running in
the VM appear on your desktop as if Win7 was running it itself.
Either I didn't know that or I failed to get VMware to run the XPMode
machine - can't remember. I may even have tried to get the Windows VM
to run the VMware XP guest OS; again, I don't remember :)

But since my other XP was licensed, I didn't try too hard. Maybe,
inspired by you, I'll look into it again.
 
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P

Paul

Gene said:
Either I didn't know that or I failed to get VMware to run the XPMode
machine - can't remember. I may even have tried to get the Windows VM to
run the VMware XP guest OS; again, I don't remember :)

But since my other XP was licensed, I didn't try too hard. Maybe,
inspired by you, I'll look into it again.
If you're going to do the work, I think the conversion item in the
menu for WinXP Mode is in VMWare 3. And that item is missing from
VMWare 4. It's also possible there is a standalone tool, a "helper"
for VMWare 4. Yousef never got back to us on his attempt.

Teaser, from VMWare Player 3.1. Perhaps once this is done, you can move
to VMWare Player 4.

http://picturestack.com/750/949/IXC14VMwarePlblR.jpg

Paul
 
G

Gene E. Bloch

If you're going to do the work, I think the conversion item in the
menu for WinXP Mode is in VMWare 3. And that item is missing from
VMWare 4. It's also possible there is a standalone tool, a "helper"
for VMWare 4. Yousef never got back to us on his attempt.
Teaser, from VMWare Player 3.1. Perhaps once this is done, you can move
to VMWare Player 4.

Paul
Running VMware Reader 4.0.1 build-528992.

Basically, since it's satisfactory for my needs, the rest is just a
learning exercise, which requires me not to be in lazy mood :)

ISTR that there are tools on the VMware site to convert other VMs into
their vmx format, so even without a direct menu item in the app, I cold
try those tools - unless they don't actually exist outside of my
imagination :)

Found this after a brief excursion to VMware Reader's help:

http://www.vmware.com/products/converter/

A quick glance makes me think it would work.
 
T

TheGunslinger

Not exactly - Windows 7 Pro 32-bit will run most 16-bit software just
fine. Windows 7 64-bit, however, will not and requires either XP Mode
(for Pro/Enterprise) or some other virtual machine, such as VMWare,
Virtual PC, etc. running a 32-bit version of Windows (or pure DOS, for
the hard-core).


If you are saying that Windows 7 64-bit won't run 16-bit software
natively, that is correct. However, the version of XP Mode that comes
with Pro/Enterprise runs a 32-bit copy of XP so it is capable of
running 16-bit software. Same with MS Virtual PC, assuming a 32-bit
version of Windows is installed there of course.

Interesting, I haven'y been successful in getting any of my really old
legacy 16-bit software (8088/8086) or versions that ran on the 386/486
software to run on my 64-bit Windows 7 w/ XP-Mode.

Whereas, on the 32-bit Win 7 Pro machine w/ Virtual PC 2007, I can
install and run all the software under the original OS it was designed
for.

BTW, I have saved my copies of all my OS's going back to MS-DOS 5.0.
Part of the reason being of course, they are mostly upgrade versions.

TTYL,

MJR
 
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T

TheGunslinger

It's more robust with better support for "other" operating systems. The
downside to using VMWare (or any other VM system) is you have to bring your
own XP license with you. XP-Mode comes with 1 included in the cost of Pro or
Ultimate.

FYI,

If you are a student or a member of IEEE or ACM, they have a MSDNAA
site where you can d/l legal copies of MS DOS 6.22, Windows XP, and
others as well as other MS software. A lot depends what their contract
permits.

As a student, I was able to get full copies of Windows 7 32-bit (x86)
and 64-bit (x64) for my systems needing upgrading through my college.

As a member of ACM and IEEE, I have d/l'd MS-DOS 6.22 and XP Pro.

So, the stuff is out there if you have the resources or good friends
that can help you d/l a copy and get a legit license.

TTYL,

MJR
 

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