Home Basic vs Home Premium vs Professional?


P

(PeteCresswell)

I'm looking at
http://www.sevenforums.com/tutorials/14422-compare-windows-7-editions.html
and am getting a little boggled.

- I don't care about cosmetics

- I use 3rd-party utilities for backup and imaging

- I use TeamViewer instead of RDP

- If/when I want an FTP server I use ServU

I'm guessing that anything with "Aero" in the name is moot to me.

Sounds like with basic, I have to download the 64-bit installer.

That being said, is there any reason I would regret going for
Basic rather that Premium?

Any reason to look at Professional?


Finally, I notice a rather large price break between "OEM" and
other versions - like $100+.

Is there something not quite right with somebody offering an OEM
version without selling a PC with it? Or is it just that once
it is registered, the user is locked into the box it is
registered to? If #2, how is the box identified? i.e. Mobo
SN? or maybe some hash total whee changing one component makes it
look like a different PC?
 
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W

Wolf K

That being said, is there any reason I would regret going for
Basic rather that Premium?
Basic has much less capability. Basic is for minimal/under-powered
hardware. Premium is what you want. Pro, if you want easier networking,
etc. Pro doesn't have media centre, and few other media goodies, but
they are all free downloads.

HTH
 
W

Wolf K

Finally, I notice a rather large price break between "OEM" and
other versions - like $100+.

Is there something not quite right with somebody offering an OEM
version without selling a PC with it? Or is it just that once
it is registered, the user is locked into the box it is
registered to? If #2, how is the box identified? i.e. Mobo
SN? or maybe some hash total whee changing one component makes it
look like a different PC?
The OEM version is for any mass-produced or custom-built system. I
bought an OEM version for my custom-built system - which I built myself.
No problems.
 
G

Good Guy

I'm looking at
http://www.sevenforums.com/tutorials/14422-compare-windows-7-editions.html
and am getting a little boggled.

- I don't care about cosmetics

- I use 3rd-party utilities for backup and imaging

- I use TeamViewer instead of RDP

- If/when I want an FTP server I use ServU

I'm guessing that anything with "Aero" in the name is moot to me.

Sounds like with basic, I have to download the 64-bit installer.

That being said, is there any reason I would regret going for
Basic rather that Premium?

Any reason to look at Professional?


Finally, I notice a rather large price break between "OEM" and
other versions - like $100+.

Is there something not quite right with somebody offering an OEM
version without selling a PC with it? Or is it just that once
it is registered, the user is locked into the box it is
registered to? If #2, how is the box identified? i.e. Mobo
SN? or maybe some hash total whee changing one component makes it
look like a different PC?
I am using Professional because of higher-security; I just upgraded
from XP Professional and installed the SP1 and patches since SP1.

You can download Windows from DigitalRiver servers (as used by Microsoft
to distribute its products) and use any serial number with them and they
should work including OEM serial numbers.


• Windows 7 Home Premium (x86) - X17-58996
<http://msft.digitalrivercontent.net/win/X17-58996.iso>

• Windows 7 Home Premium (x64) - X17-58997
<http://msft.digitalrivercontent.net/win/X17-58997.iso>

• Windows 7 Professional (x86) - X17-59183
<http://msft.digitalrivercontent.net/win/X17-59183.iso>

• Windows 7 Professional (x64) - X17-59186
<http://msft.digitalrivercontent.net/win/X17-59186.iso>

• Windows 7 Ultimate (x86)* - X17-59463
<http://msft.digitalrivercontent.net/win/X17-59463.iso>

• Windows 7 Ultimate (x64)* - X17-59465
<http://msft.digitalrivercontent.net/win/X17-59465.iso>

You can also download Microsoft's Tool to create bootable USB flash
drive from here:

<http://www.microsoftstore.com/store/msstore/html/pbPage.Help_Win7_usbdvd_dwnTool>

--
Good Guy
Website: http://mytaxsite.co.uk
Website: http://html-css.co.uk
Forums: http://mytaxsite.boardhost.com
Email: http://mytaxsite.co.uk/contact-us
 
B

Bruce Hagen

(PeteCresswell) said:
I'm looking at
http://www.sevenforums.com/tutorials/14422-compare-windows-7-editions.html
and am getting a little boggled.

- I don't care about cosmetics

- I use 3rd-party utilities for backup and imaging

- I use TeamViewer instead of RDP

- If/when I want an FTP server I use ServU

I'm guessing that anything with "Aero" in the name is moot to me.

Sounds like with basic, I have to download the 64-bit installer.

That being said, is there any reason I would regret going for
Basic rather that Premium?

Any reason to look at Professional?


Finally, I notice a rather large price break between "OEM" and
other versions - like $100+.

Is there something not quite right with somebody offering an OEM
version without selling a PC with it? Or is it just that once
it is registered, the user is locked into the box it is
registered to? If #2, how is the box identified? i.e. Mobo
SN? or maybe some hash total whee changing one component makes it
look like a different PC?




You may never need it, but with Pro or higher, you can use XP Mode. It has
come in handy for me.

Download Windows XP Mode with Virtual PC
http://www.microsoft.com/windows/virtual-pc/download.aspx
 
J

Jeff Barnett

I'm looking at
http://www.sevenforums.com/tutorials/14422-compare-windows-7-editions.html
and am getting a little boggled.

- I don't care about cosmetics

- I use 3rd-party utilities for backup and imaging

- I use TeamViewer instead of RDP

- If/when I want an FTP server I use ServU

I'm guessing that anything with "Aero" in the name is moot to me.

Sounds like with basic, I have to download the 64-bit installer.

That being said, is there any reason I would regret going for
Basic rather that Premium?

Any reason to look at Professional?


Finally, I notice a rather large price break between "OEM" and
other versions - like $100+.

Is there something not quite right with somebody offering an OEM
version without selling a PC with it? Or is it just that once
it is registered, the user is locked into the box it is
registered to? If #2, how is the box identified? i.e. Mobo
SN? or maybe some hash total whee changing one component makes it
look like a different PC?
The URL you provided leads to a table that describes which Win 7
versions provide what capabilities. There is a capability labeled
"Branche (sic) Cache Distributed Cache" in that table. What is it?
-- Jeff Barnett
 
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P

Paul

Jeff said:
There is a capability labeled
"Branche (sic) Cache Distributed Cache" in that table. What is it?
-- Jeff Barnett
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd637832(v=WS.10).aspx

"BranchCache Overview

BranchCache is designed to reduce WAN link utilization and improve
application responsiveness for branch office workers who access content
from servers in remote locations. Branch office client computers use a
locally maintained cache of data to reduce traffic over a WAN link.
The cache can be distributed across client computers (Distributed Cache mode)
or can be housed on a server in the branch (Hosted Cache mode)."

Exciting stuff, if you work in the IT department.

Paul
 
W

...winston

"Wolf K" wrote in message
Basic has much less capability. Basic is for minimal/under-powered
hardware. Premium is what you want. Pro, if you want easier networking,
etc. Pro doesn't have media centre, and few other media goodies, but
they are all free downloads.

HTH
[/QUOTE]

@Wolk K

Fyi...Windows Media Center is include in Win7 Home Premium and higher
versions...i.e. included in Win7 Pro (and Ultimate and Enterprise)
 
S

Seth

Paul said:
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd637832(v=WS.10).aspx

"BranchCache Overview

BranchCache is designed to reduce WAN link utilization and improve
application responsiveness for branch office workers who access
content
from servers in remote locations. Branch office client computers use a
locally maintained cache of data to reduce traffic over a WAN link.
The cache can be distributed across client computers (Distributed
Cache mode)
or can be housed on a server in the branch (Hosted Cache mode)."

Exciting stuff, if you work in the IT department.
Yeah, it's basically a managed\corporate version of a torrent like file
distribution system. Looking to implement on 180,000 seats globally next
year. Have to upgrade the servers first as well to take full advantage.
 
J

Jeff Barnett

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd637832(v=WS.10).aspx

"BranchCache Overview

BranchCache is designed to reduce WAN link utilization and improve
application responsiveness for branch office workers who access
content
from servers in remote locations. Branch office client computers use a
locally maintained cache of data to reduce traffic over a WAN link.
The cache can be distributed across client computers (Distributed
Cache mode)
or can be housed on a server in the branch (Hosted Cache mode)."

Exciting stuff, if you work in the IT department.
I don't. Just getting ready to move a two-computer home from XP to 7 in
the near future. I couldn't parse the name in isolation and thought it
might have something to do with cache management on multi-core chips.
Since I'm a Photo Shop user that would have been exciting stuff and
might influence whether I installed 7 Pro or the next step up. Thank you
for the useful (and money-saving) information.
 
P

Paul

Jeff said:
I don't. Just getting ready to move a two-computer home from XP to 7 in
the near future. I couldn't parse the name in isolation and thought it
might have something to do with cache management on multi-core chips.
Since I'm a Photo Shop user that would have been exciting stuff and
might influence whether I installed 7 Pro or the next step up. Thank you
for the useful (and money-saving) information.
I found the name kinda deceiving myself, which is why I had to look
it up to find out :) I couldn't imagine them doing something at
that level, for product differentiation (like screwing around with
CPU performance).

Paul
 
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P

(PeteCresswell)

Per Bruce Hagen:
You may never need it, but with Pro or higher, you can use XP Mode. It has
come in handy for me.
Which begs the question that's been in the back of my mind since
first seeing "XP Mode"....

Is "XP Mode" something global - i.e. where one boots up the
system in "XP Mode"?

Or is it on an application-by-application basis where an
application can be started in "XP Mode" while the rest of the sys
is running normally?
 
Z

Zaphod Beeblebrox

You may never need it, but with Pro or higher, you can use XP Mode. It has
come in handy for me.
Which begs the question that's been in the back of my mind since
first seeing "XP Mode"....

Is "XP Mode" something global - i.e. where one boots up the
system in "XP Mode"?

Or is it on an application-by-application basis where an
application can be started in "XP Mode" while the rest of the sys
is running normally?[/QUOTE]


It is a VM (virtual machine) that you run inside of Windows 7 that
looks and works almost exactly like running XP natively. Video isn't
as good (no 3d as far as I know), performance is a little lacking, and
hardware is virtualized but otherwise it is just like running XP.

From what I understand, you can also run it on an application-by-
application basis as you describe, but I've not run it that way so I
can't really comment or offer advice.
 
G

Gene E. Bloch

Which begs the question that's been in the back of my mind since
first seeing "XP Mode"....

Is "XP Mode" something global - i.e. where one boots up the
system in "XP Mode"?

Or is it on an application-by-application basis where an
application can be started in "XP Mode" while the rest of the sys
is running normally?
It is a VM (virtual machine) that you run inside of Windows 7 that
looks and works almost exactly like running XP natively. Video isn't
as good (no 3d as far as I know), performance is a little lacking, and
hardware is virtualized but otherwise it is just like running XP.

From what I understand, you can also run it on an application-by-
application basis as you describe, but I've not run it that way so I
can't really comment or offer advice.[/QUOTE]

My understanding is that the application-by-application basis is a
matter of configuring the VM to be invisible except for the application
you are running.

As anecdotal evidence(?), when I tried to run an application that way,
the program took nearly as long to start as if I had booted the VM first
and then started the program :)

I didn't use XP Mode for very long, since it was not a match to my apps,
so I didn't learn very much, sorry.
 
G

Gene E. Bloch

My understanding is that the application-by-application basis is a
matter of configuring the VM to be invisible except for the application
you are running.
That seems a bit unclearly written.

What I mean is that if you tell XP Mode to run a program that way, XP
Mode automatically hides the VM and just shows the application's
window(s), which makes it look like it's running on the host machine.
 
P

Paul

Gene said:
That seems a bit unclearly written.

What I mean is that if you tell XP Mode to run a program that way, XP
Mode automatically hides the VM and just shows the application's
window(s), which makes it look like it's running on the host machine.
There are various technical terms for that, which might not
please everyone. A "rooted" virtual machine, presents an
image of the entire guest OS desktop. A "rootless" application
window, renders the program window in the host OS desktop, as
if the program had been launched from the host itself. When using
a "rootless" setup for a WinXP Mode program, the WinXP desktop
should not be evident. WinXP Mode VM is still running, just
not drawing and taking up space for the entire desktop. As
I understand it though, you still have the option of seeing
and accessing the WinXP Mode desktop if you want to. There
should still be a way to do that, as a means to interact with
that OS (like, use a control panel).

The rootless WinXP Mode running program, uses Terminal Services RDP
protocol, to ask Windows 7 to display the window of the program. And
that's how the window gets to draw into the Windows 7 desktop, without
any WinXP Mode desktop showing.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Remote_Desktop_Services

Paul
 
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P

(PeteCresswell)

Per ...winston:
Basic has much less capability. Basic is for minimal/under-powered
hardware.
Is that to say that it is less resource-intensive? If so, it
seems like that might be an argument for using it over "higher"
versions if the missing capabilities are not something the user
needs or wants (e.g. maybe the variable transparency of
windows...)

Can anybody expand on "easier" networking? All I want is tb
able to

- Create shares into a NAS box (as in NET USE ...)

- Designate certain folders on one PC as visible
to other PCs
 
W

...winston

"(PeteCresswell)" wrote in message
Wolf K wrote:
Basic has much less capability. Basic is for minimal/under-powered
hardware.
Is that to say that it is less resource-intensive? If so, it
seems like that might be an argument for using it over "higher"
versions if the missing capabilities are not something the user
needs or wants (e.g. maybe the variable transparency of
windows...)

Can anybody expand on "easier" networking? All I want is tb
able to

- Create shares into a NAS box (as in NET USE ...)
- Designate certain folders on one PC as visible
to other PCs[/QUOTE]

Basic is primarily intended for emerging market countries and
correspondingly has less geographical availability which also means
geographical restrictions on activation.

Home Basic is only capable of joining a network. Home Premium is able to
create and join a network.

Imo. Home Premium based on the info you've provided would probably be
sufficient (if those are your only needs) and possibly a better choice.
Personally I prefer the Pro version.
 
P

(PeteCresswell)

Per ...winston:
Imo. Home Premium based on the info you've provided would probably be
sufficient (if those are your only needs) and possibly a better choice.
Personally I prefer the Pro version.
Ok, you've talked me out of Basic.

What does Premium do for you that I might want done for me?
 
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J

J. P. Gilliver (John)

In message <jup8g8$okm$1@dont-email.me>, ...winston

[snip Pete Cresswell's bit - I think; ...winston is using WLW15 without
http://www.dusko-lolic.from.hr/wlmquote/, so I'm not sure who said what]
Basic is primarily intended for emerging market countries and
correspondingly has less geographical availability which also means
geographical restrictions on activation.
[]
I presume you mean as an aftermarket add-on. It's certainly widely
available here (UK, not I wouldn't have thought an "emerging market")
installed on basic netbooks.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G.5AL-IS-P--Ch++(p)Ar@T0H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

.... unlike other legal systems the common law is permissive. We can do what we
like, unless it is specifically prohibited by law. We are not as rule-bound
and codified as other legal systems. - Helena Kennedy QC (Radio Times 14-20
July 2012).
 

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