Dual Boot Xp Latest info


B

BeeJ

Looking for the latest info from you on dual boot Win7 pro and WinXP
pro

Laptop
HD partitioned into three. Win7, XP and data.
Win7 pro installed and backed up with Macrium Reflect.

now, how do I go about installing Win XP on the XP partition and set up
dual boot? XP pro DVD is configured for this laptop and could be
installed as the only OS.
 
N

Nil

Looking for the latest info from you on dual boot Win7 pro and
WinXP pro

Laptop
HD partitioned into three. Win7, XP and data.
Win7 pro installed and backed up with Macrium Reflect.

now, how do I go about installing Win XP on the XP partition and
set up dual boot? XP pro DVD is configured for this laptop and
could be installed as the only OS.
The general wisdom is that you install XP first. Win7, being the new
OS, will recognize the existing OS and will offer a dual-boot option.

Since you're going at it the other way around, I'm sure there are other
methods, maybe using 3rd party boot managers. I don't know how to do
it, though.
 
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R

Roy Smith

Looking for the latest info from you on dual boot Win7 pro and WinXP pro

Laptop
HD partitioned into three. Win7, XP and data.
Win7 pro installed and backed up with Macrium Reflect.

now, how do I go about installing Win XP on the XP partition and set up
dual boot? XP pro DVD is configured for this laptop and could be
installed as the only OS.
Actually it would have been much easier to install WinXP first, then
install Win7, because the installer for Windows 7 would have then
automatically set up the PC for dual booting if you wanted it. But since
it's the other way around you will find this article helpful:

http://www.howtogeek.com/howto/8790/dual-boot-your-pre-installed-windows-7-computer-with-xp/

Since you already have the partition available for XP you can skip down
about halfway through the article.


--

Roy Smith
Windows 8 64-Bit
Thunderbird 17.0.5
Thursday, April 25, 2013 12:26:49 PM
 
R

Roger Mills

Actually it would have been much easier to install WinXP first, then
install Win7, because the installer for Windows 7 would have then
automatically set up the PC for dual booting if you wanted it. But since
it's the other way around you will find this article helpful:

http://www.howtogeek.com/howto/8790/dual-boot-your-pre-installed-windows-7-computer-with-xp/


Since you already have the partition available for XP you can skip down
about halfway through the article.
I'm a bit confused by that! I'm assuming that the partition into which
XP is to be installed needs to be a primary partition rather than a
logical one. The OP doesn't say which his is.

I was always under the impression that, in Windows, you can only have
one active primary partition, and that any other primary partitions will
not be visible. But, the example given in the link seems to show another
primary partition which *is* visible, and which has been allocated a
drive letter.

Comments anybody?
--
Cheers,
Roger
____________
Please reply to Newsgroup. Whilst email address is valid, it is seldom
checked.
 
S

Stef

Roger said:
I'm a bit confused by that! I'm assuming that the partition into which
XP is to be installed needs to be a primary partition rather than a
logical one. The OP doesn't say which his is.

I was always under the impression that, in Windows, you can only have
one active primary partition, and that any other primary partitions will
not be visible. But, the example given in the link seems to show another
primary partition which *is* visible, and which has been allocated a
drive letter.

Comments anybody?
Not true.

Windows will "recognize" any number of primary and/or
logical partitions, whether it can access them depends on what
filesystem is on them. However, only one primary partition can be
designated bootable, traditionally the first, and it is assigned the
C: drive letter.

Stef
 
Z

Zaphod Beeblebrox

On Thu, 25 Apr 2013 18:59:32 +0100, "Roger Mills"
I'm a bit confused by that! I'm assuming that the partition into which
XP is to be installed needs to be a primary partition rather than a
logical one. The OP doesn't say which his is.

I was always under the impression that, in Windows, you can only have
one active primary partition, and that any other primary partitions will
not be visible. But, the example given in the link seems to show another
primary partition which *is* visible, and which has been allocated a
drive letter.

Comments anybody?
You can have 4 partitions on a disk, all 4 primary, or if you like, 3
primary and one extended partition which can be subdivided into logical
partitions.

All 4 partitions can be visible, but only one can be "Active". The
Active partition is the one where the boot flag is set.

See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Disk_partitioning and
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boot_flag for more info.
 
P

Paul

Roy said:
Actually it would have been much easier to install WinXP first, then
install Win7, because the installer for Windows 7 would have then
automatically set up the PC for dual booting if you wanted it. But since
it's the other way around you will find this article helpful:

http://www.howtogeek.com/howto/8790/dual-boot-your-pre-installed-windows-7-computer-with-xp/


Since you already have the partition available for XP you can skip down
about halfway through the article.
To give some hints as to what Microsoft tools you might use
to do what is described in the HowToGeek...

1) Install WinXP, pointing to the partition you want to use.
I recommend setting the label of that partition, while
you're still in Windows 7 Disk Management. For example,
my C: right now, the label is "WINXP". The label on my
Windows 2K partition is "WIN2K". This helps a bit, at least
in environments where you can actually see the label.
2) The WinXP installation messes up the MBR. Time to reach for
your Windows 7 recovery CD (the one the laptop made you burn
when you got it). This is a 200MB disc, which will get you
into a command prompt window. A Windows 7 installer DVD has
the same feature, only the Windows 7 installer DVD would be
several gigabytes of files, not just the 200MB environment
of the recovery CD.

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/927392/en-us

In ancient times, a person would use "fixmbr" to rewrite
the 440 bytes of boot load code in the MBR. An alternative
is "bootsect", with an argument to select the right flavor
of boor code. The above Microsoft article, does that
instead, using "bootrec /fixmbr", so there are perhaps
two ways to do it from Windows 7 recovery environment.

The partition table in the MBR, has the option to mark
partitions with an active flag. You can use the "diskpart"
utility, to move the flag if it is pointing to the wrong
partition. I might run diskpart first, and move the
boot flag.

(Select the disk, select the partition, say "active" to move
the boot flag there. An "asterisk" should indicate that partition
is now the one with the active boot flag. The WinXP install makes
the WinXP partition active, and now we want the Windows 7 to be
active again, like it was originally.)

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/300415

Next, run the bootrec /fixmbr, so the 440 byte Windows 7
boot code is in the MBR. As far as I know, that should be enough
to get Windows 7 to boot first and present the boot menu. But
the boot menu doesn't have WinXP in it yet. You won't see
this yet.

http://cdn.howtogeek.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/01/21dual.png

*******

The trail gets a little foggy at this point. We need to add
WinXP to the boot menu.

The bcdedit command can put that back. You'd need to
research bcdedit to use it (it's complicated, hurts my brain).
Or, you could try this. I don't know if bootrec is clever
enough to scan for more than Windows 7, and put the two
Windows partitions in the menu or not. But, you could try it.
See the description link on the 927392 page above, for the
details. Strictly speaking, there is nothing wrong with the
bcd at this point, and we'd only be trying this in the hope
this recipe is easier :) At the very least, this procedure
can repair the bcd, if you damage it while playing around.

bcdedit /export C:\BCD_Backup
c:
cd boot
attrib bcd -s -h -r
ren c:\boot\bcd bcd.old
bootrec /RebuildBcd

Instead, you could boot right into Windows 7, and use bcdedit
from there. This is an example of an article, listing the
command options to bcdedit.

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc709667(v=ws.10).aspx

An example is shown here, of using bcdedit. It is pointing
the boot loader at partition F: for the WINXP partition.
Adjust that drive letter, so it aligns with where your
partition ended up.

http://www.sevenforums.com/tutorials/2676-bcdedit-how-use.html

bcdedit /create {ntldr} /d "Windows XP"

bcdedit /set {ntldr} device partition=F:

bcdedit /set {ntldr} path \ntldr

bcdedit /displayorder {ntldr} /addlast

And if that were to mess up, you can always go back
to the recovery console and try the "bootrec /RebuildBcd" thing.

Instead of bcdedit, you can use EasyBCD. I haven't tried
that in several years - it used to be free. Run this from
Windows 7, add WinXP as a boot option.

EasyBCD 1.7.2.exe
758,937 bytes
MD5SUM = 79a4ab150667f70a4838cd08d85c1691

Using the MD5SUM, I traced down an old link to it. This is where
it used to be stored. You can try this first (but don't hold your
breath).

http://neosmart.net/downloads/software/EasyBCD/EasyBCD 1.7.2.exe

A backup copy could be here. This should prompt you to save a file.
Verify the MD5SUM and you're ready to go.

http://web.archive.org/web/20100611230031/http://neosmart.net/downloads/software/EasyBCD/EasyBCD 1.7.2.exe

HTH,
Paul
 
R

R. C. White

Hi, Zaphod.

Correct, and you explained it very clearly.

To the OP - and others:
A half-hour invested in studying what Disk Management will tell you about
YOUR computer's disk configuration will pay you big dividends, not just for
today, but for as long as you keep using computers, especially Windows.

And if you have more than a half-hour, have a look at Disk Management's Help
file. It will take more time because the Help file is organized as a
reference, not a textbook or tutorial. You can't just read it linearly, but
must jump from one topic to another, using hyperlinks and the Contents. And
you MUST respect Microsoft's terminology, especially with such terms as
"system partition" and "boot volume"; these DO NOT conform with most users'
expectations of their meanings. (Remember Ed Bott's line: "Those
unfamiliar with such things may think it strange that we BOOT from the
SYSTEM partition and keep the operating SYSTEM files in the BOOT volume!")

RC
--
R. C. White, CPA
San Marcos, TX
(e-mail address removed)
Microsoft Windows MVP (2002-2010)
Windows Live Mail 2012 (Build 16.4.3505.0912) in Win8 Pro



"Zaphod Beeblebrox" wrote in message

On Thu, 25 Apr 2013 18:59:32 +0100, "Roger Mills"
I'm a bit confused by that! I'm assuming that the partition into which
XP is to be installed needs to be a primary partition rather than a
logical one. The OP doesn't say which his is.

I was always under the impression that, in Windows, you can only have
one active primary partition, and that any other primary partitions will
not be visible. But, the example given in the link seems to show another
primary partition which *is* visible, and which has been allocated a
drive letter.

Comments anybody?
You can have 4 partitions on a disk, all 4 primary, or if you like, 3
primary and one extended partition which can be subdivided into logical
partitions.

All 4 partitions can be visible, but only one can be "Active". The
Active partition is the one where the boot flag is set.

See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Disk_partitioning and
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boot_flag for more info.
 
M

mechanic

Instead of bcdedit, you can use EasyBCD. I haven't tried
that in several years - it used to be free. Run this from
Windows 7, add WinXP as a boot option.

EasyBCD 1.7.2.exe
758,937 bytes
MD5SUM = 79a4ab150667f70a4838cd08d85c1691
That's a bit old. Latest version of EasyBCD (ver. 2.2
http://neosmart.net/EasyBCD/) supports win 7/8. Free for personal
use.
 
P

Paul

mechanic said:
That's a bit old. Latest version of EasyBCD (ver. 2.2
http://neosmart.net/EasyBCD/) supports win 7/8. Free for personal
use.
Weird.

That's the first time I've ever had a "Save As" box appear for
a file, and then nothing happens after that.

No file.

I had to change browsers, to get the download to work!

Paul
 
G

gufus

"Paul" wrote in message
That's the first time I've ever had a "Save As" box appear for
a file, and then nothing happens after that.
Worked here with IE9
 
B

BeeJ

Looking for the latest info from you on dual boot Win7 pro and WinXP pro
Laptop
HD partitioned into three. Win7, XP and data.
Win7 pro installed and backed up with Macrium Reflect.

now, how do I go about installing Win XP on the XP partition and set up dual
boot? XP pro DVD is configured for this laptop and could be installed as the
only OS.
Thanks All!
 
G

Gene E. Bloch

"Paul" wrote in message

Worked here with IE9
And here with FF - but only after I edited the link, since my reader
thought the paren was part of it. Maybe that was Paul's problem...
 
G

gufus

"Gene E. Bloch" wrote in message
And here with FF - but only after I edited the link, since my reader
thought the paren was part of it. Maybe that was Paul's problem...
I might add, that link is the website.
 
P

Paul

Gene said:
And here with FF - but only after I edited the link, since my reader
thought the paren was part of it. Maybe that was Paul's problem...
I actually got a Save As dialog box, implying the download had
started. But once I clicked the button, to save the file,
there was no further response. The Save As dialog disappears,
but there is no entry in the Download dialog, and no file in my
download directory. Firefox 3.0.19 on WinXP.

http://imageshack.us/a/img849/5594/easybcddown.gif

Download worked fine in Seamonkey (which is a more modern
release than my Firefox).

Paul
 
G

Gene E. Bloch

"Gene E. Bloch" wrote in message


I might add, that link is the website.
Not when the newsreader (Dialog) thinks the closing parenthesis is part
of the link. Then it produces a 404. Thus my remark.
 
G

gufus

"Gene E. Bloch" wrote in message
Not when the newsreader (Dialog) thinks the closing parenthesis is part
of the link. Then it produces a 404. Thus my remark.
Ah.
 
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