Dell monitor not direct3D compatible after upgrade from Vista


T

TS742

The model of the monitor is SE198WFPv. The computer is Dell inspiron
531S with AMD Sempron Processor LE-1250 2.20GHz 32bit operating
system.

Ever since I upgraded to Windows 7 from Vista, I get the error message
that the video card needs to be direct3D compatible. This therefore
does not allow me to use screen savers involving motion. The video
card and monitor had no trouble displaying direct3D objects in Vista.

Is the computer, video card, and monitor just not compatible with
Windows 7, even though it worked great on Vista? Do I really need a
new video card?
 
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T

TS742

The model of the monitor is SE198WFPv. The computer is Dell inspiron
531S with AMD Sempron Processor LE-1250 2.20GHz 32bit operating
system.

Ever since I upgraded to Windows 7 from Vista, I get the error message
that the video card needs to be direct3D compatible. This therefore
does not allow me to use screen savers involving motion. The video
card and monitor had no trouble displaying direct3D objects in Vista.

Is the computer, video card, and monitor just not compatible with
Windows 7, even though it worked great on Vista? Do I really need a
new video card?
I've been search google for the answer for the last 2 days and haven't
quite found the answer yet.
 
T

TS742

Have you installed the unnamed video card's drivers for Windows 7?
Personally, I wouldn't have upgraded but backed up my data and done a
clean install of Windows 7.
Actually, that's what I did, a clean install, as I had backed up
important stuff. I'll see if I can find the driver online. I do not
know the name of the video card.
 
T

TS742

Install Belarc Advisor free and it will tell everything you want to know
about your computer.
I tried it.
Display: generic VGA
Monitor: non-plug-n-play
 
C

Char Jackson

I tried it.
Display: generic VGA
Monitor: non-plug-n-play
On the computer I happen to be working on at the moment, Belarc
reports the following under the Display heading:

NVIDIA GeForce 8600 GT [Display adapter]
Aopen F95GS [Monitor] (19.1"vis, s/n 52700206LE46, July 2005)

Yours looks like the hardware-specific video driver hasn't been
installed yet and it's just using the default VGA driver. Install the
proper video driver and run belarc again so you can compare the
results.
 
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W

...winston

Dell Inspiron 531s (introduced circa 2007)

Specs:
http://support.dell.com/support/edocs/systems/inspd531/en/om/appendix.htm#wp1149549
- Nvidia integrated video (DirectX 9.0 Shader Model 3.0 Graphics Processing Unit)
- based on the 64MB GeForce 6150 or 6150Se

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GeForce_6_Series


--
....winston
msft mvp mail


"TS742" wrote in message
The model of the monitor is SE198WFPv. The computer is Dell inspiron
531S with AMD Sempron Processor LE-1250 2.20GHz 32bit operating
system.

Ever since I upgraded to Windows 7 from Vista, I get the error message
that the video card needs to be direct3D compatible. This therefore
does not allow me to use screen savers involving motion. The video
card and monitor had no trouble displaying direct3D objects in Vista.

Is the computer, video card, and monitor just not compatible with
Windows 7, even though it worked great on Vista? Do I really need a
new video card?
 
P

Paul

....winston said:
Dell Inspiron 531s (introduced circa 2007)

Specs:
http://support.dell.com/support/edocs/systems/inspd531/en/om/appendix.htm#wp1149549

- Nvidia integrated video (DirectX 9.0 Shader Model 3.0 Graphics
Processing Unit)
- based on the 64MB GeForce 6150 or 6150Se

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GeForce_6_Series
The Nvidia driver search engine seems to be busted, so
I used an external search engine and "site:geforce.com" to
find these. The first is for a 64 bit OS. The second
is for a 32 bit OS. These should fix the problem for now.

You can use your System control panel, to determine whether
the OS was installed in 32 bit or 64 bit mode. In this
example picture, the system is using a 64 bit OS, and the first driver
would be the one to try.

http://pc.net/images/db/windows-7-system-control-panel.png

*******

http://www.geforce.com/Drivers/Results/39239

GeForce 285.79 Driver
Release Date Thu Nov 10, 2011
Operating System Windows 7 64-bit
Windows Vista 64-bit
Language English (US)
File Size 187.4 MB

Supported Products ... GeForce 6150SE

*******

http://www.geforce.com/Drivers/Results/40608

GeForce 290.53 Driver

Release Date Wed Dec 21, 2011
Operating System Windows 7 32-bit
Windows Vista 32-bit
Language English (US)
File Size 155.06 MB

Supported Products ... GeForce 6150SE

*******

In addition to that, you have some other considerations.

The Aero effects, may require DirectX 9 support, but
the memory used by the graphics is supposed to be 128MB.

The 6150SE (built-in graphics), uses shared memory. It uses
some of the system memory.

The BIOS may have a setting to determine the amount of sharing.

But, the amount of installed system memory can play a part as well.

A poorly written BIOS, may give you no control at all over this.

To illustrate, using a retail motherboard from that era, this is
the Asrock manual for the 939NF6G-VSTA motherboard. This has
the 6150SE, which is why I picked this particular manual.

http://www.asrock.com/MB/overview.asp?Model=939NF6G-VSTA

ftp://174.142.97.10/manual/939NF6G-VSTA.pdf

On page 33 of that manual, it refers to:

"Share Memory

This allows you to set share memory feature. The default value is [Auto].
Configuration options: [Auto], [16MB], [32MB], [64MB], [128MB], and [256MB]."

So if the OS complains there isn't enough graphics memory to run special
effects, you go to the BIOS to adjust it. Problem is, that setting
exists on a retail (home built computer) motherboard. But on a
Dell, they could "dumb it down" and avoid that setting entirely.
As an example, someone with an HP computer based on 6150SE,
installed 2GB of DDR memory, to try to coax his BIOS to make
the "shared" larger. And when he checked, the BIOS was still
automatically selecting 64MB for the "shared" setting. Even a
dumbed down BIOS is supposed to be smart enough, to set the
shared larger, as the system memory installation gets larger.

If the shared setting won't change, then you can install a
separate video card. It should be a low end card, one without
a PCI Express 2x3 power connector, as your machine may not have
a big enough ATX supply for anything more substantial. Fortunately,
modern video cards have dropped a lot in terms of power level and
usage, giving about the same video performance level as you have
now. (I.e. A $50 card won't play Crysis at 30 frames per second,
but it will do things like accelerate Adobe Flash playback or the
like. Or, do your screensaver a favor :) )

This is an example of a relatively low power card. ATI HD 5450.
This is a "low profile ready" card, which also comes with low profile
faceplates in the box. In other words, the body of the video card
isn't very tall, so it fits in tight spaces. As delivered, the card
is ready to use in a "full sized" PC. If you have a slim PC, you
unscrew the faceplate, and install the shorter faceplate. Reinstalling
the VGA connector is optional. There may be an option to unplug it
from the video card surface. The second faceplate, is for if you
have a slot next to the video card, where the second faceplate can fit.
If so, then the VGA connector can be fitted in the second slot position.
That's why the VGA connector is on a ribbon cable, for rearrangement.
So for $35, you get some pretty flexible hardware. And it's good enough
for most "tick box" features needed by the OS.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814161322

You can see why I selected that card, here.

http://www.xbitlabs.com/articles/graphics/display/gpu-power-consumption-2010_3.html#sect0

HD5450 idle 3.2 watts
play a BluRay 8.0 watts
play Crysis 9.2 watts

That's why the card doesn't have a fan. They feel there is enough
air movement inside the PC casing, to keep it cool.

This would be the low power winner from Nvidia, the Geforce 210.
It comes with the optional faceplates as well. Note that not
all video cards, have the needed faceplates, You have to check
for them. They're not that easy to find elsewhere (i.e. an exact fit).

Comparable Geforce 210...
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814500237

Before buying either video card, use the customer feedback tab on
those web pages, and read the reviews. With inexpensive cards,
quality can always be an issue. And before you buy, make sure the users
are happy with their purchase.

All of that trouble, because the BIOS doesn't have an adjustment...

Paul
 
C

charlie

I can only think that you are looking in the wrong place in Belarc's
output. I no longer have it installed, so I can't check where to look.

Consider finding and running the free program GPU-Z, or another one,
CPU-Z.

The first has only one panel of output, so you can't look in the wrong
place.

URLs:
http://www.techpowerup.com/gpuz/
http://www.cpuid.com/softwares/cpu-z.html

While the Dell can be updated, I'd basically not really bother, unless
forced to do so by other considerations. Spending $100 on a P/C worth
that or less is (to me) not worth the trouble.

1. Small capacity power supply, may be proprietary design and size.
2. 2.2Ghz x2 processor
3. Small Case
4. The P/C model dates from 2005, and a lot of things have changed. I'd
likely use XP on it if I had one and wanted to keep it in service.

It's possible that the Generic VGA bit came about because there was not
a suitable driver included in Win 7. NVIDIA should have a driver
available, if a good search is made. It's also likely that the BIOS
version, if it's that old, will be somewhat of a limiting factor.


On board graphics that are suitable for office use, and marginal for
games, etc. (Even if new drivers are available.)
 
Y

Yousuf Khan

I tried it.
Display: generic VGA
Monitor: non-plug-n-play
The monitor itself is not the problem, it is the video card. The monitor
just displays pixels, and it has nothing to do with being 3D compatible
or not. The "3D" just refers to the video card's advanced calculation
capabilities, a 3D video card has more sophisticated calculation
circuitry than a 2D video card, but they will both display on the same
monitor with no difference.

You have to find the information it comes back about your video card,
not your monitor.

Another utility that you might want to try is called Unknown Devices. It
tries to identify devices that don't have drivers installed on your
system and tells you where to find those drivers.

Unknown Devices - Download
http://unknown-devices.en.softonic.com/

Yousuf Khan
 
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W

...winston

"Paul" wrote in message The Nvidia driver search engine seems to be busted, so
I used an external search engine and "site:geforce.com" to
find these.
GeForce 285.79 Driver
GeForce 290.53 Driver
Supported Products ... GeForce 6150SE


The latest WHQL driver for the Series 6 (6150SE) line of cards is 301.42

cf. Page 43 (shows 6150 models being supported)
http://us.download.nvidia.com/Windows/301.42/301.42-win7-winvista-desktop-release-notes.pdf

Due to the age of the graphics chipset I suspect for Direct 3D support there is not much or even anything different in any of the
archived 200.xx version drivers vs. the 301.42 driver.
 
T

TS742

...winston wrote:
The Nvidia driver search engine seems to be busted, so
I used an external search engine and "site:geforce.com" to
find these. The first is for a 64 bit OS. The second
is for a 32 bit OS. These should fix the problem for now.

You can use your System control panel, to determine whether
the OS was installed in 32 bit or 64 bit mode. In this
example picture, the system is using a 64 bit OS, and the first driver
would be the one to try.
Awesome! The links and driver software worked! The card is displayed
as:

NVIDIA GeForce 6150SE nForce 430
 
P

Paul

TS742 said:
Awesome! The links and driver software worked! The card is displayed
as:

NVIDIA GeForce 6150SE nForce 430
Nothing like a painless fix :)

Now, if Nvidia could figure out how *customers* would prefer
to see inputs to their driver search engine. The interface on that
thing, makes me grit my teeth. What's wrong with just putting
all the video cards in a long list ?

Paul
 
G

Gene E. Bloch

Nothing like a painless fix :)

Now, if Nvidia could figure out how *customers* would prefer
to see inputs to their driver search engine. The interface on that
thing, makes me grit my teeth. What's wrong with just putting
all the video cards in a long list ?

Paul
Mostly because most cards use the same driver archive. Or else there are
a few sets of cards, each set using a single driver archive, I'm not
sure. But either way, the number of cards is way more than the number of
driver files.

I have no trouble with the interface. I'm not sure whether or not I have
trouble with the drivers, however :)
 
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P

Paul

Gene said:
Mostly because most cards use the same driver archive. Or else there are
a few sets of cards, each set using a single driver archive, I'm not
sure. But either way, the number of cards is way more than the number of
driver files.

I have no trouble with the interface. I'm not sure whether or not I have
trouble with the drivers, however :)
Oh, neat. On a hunch, I compared the driver download page with
Firefox and Internet Explorer. The driver page looks entirely
different under Firefox, and the "Manual Search" is *still* broken.
Under Internet Explorer, the older looking page appears, and that
works fine. And I'm sure, when you test it (using different versions
than I'm using), yet more flavors of pages will appear.

Um, nice work NVidia, I guess.

Must be nice to be a web developer, and do half-assed work.

One reason for the search needing to be card model sensitive,
is because certain cards are "obsolete" and aren't included in
new driver bundles. In Linux, cards are split into at least
three groups. In Windows, cards like the FX5200, you have to
be real careful while searching, to find anything you can use.
The OPs 6150SE, is perilously close the the "bottom of the list",
and could fall off any day now. Same with things like the 6200.
They're the next to go, when NVidia feels like it/gets around to it.

Paul
 
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