Core Temperature


A

athiker

Using a HP notebook with Core i7 and Win 7

I monitor the core temperatures using Core Temp and Core #1 always
runs 4 to 6 C warmer than all the others.

Why would this be?
 
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A

athiker

Using a HP notebook with Core i7 and Win 7

I monitor the core temperatures using Core Temp and Core #1 always
runs 4 to 6 C warmer than all the others.

Why would this be?
I should have also said that all cores are running with approximately
the same "load", as reported by Core Temp.

A different temperature monitoring program reported the same thing.
 
C

charlie

I should have also said that all cores are running with approximately
the same "load", as reported by Core Temp.

A different temperature monitoring program reported the same thing.
Conjecture only!

The heat sink to the chip compound is not uniform
The heat sink or chip surfaces are not flat enough
The heat sink does not have a uniform size, or the air flow is not uniform.
There also are some things that have to do with how the chip is mounted
inside the case, and what is adjacent, such as circuitry that gives off
more heat.

Finally there is the possibility that the sensing devices inside the
chip are not uniform in accuracy, or the supporting circuitry on the MBD
is not quite what it should be in an ideal world.
 
W

Wolf K

I should have also said that all cores are running with approximately
the same "load", as reported by Core Temp.

A different temperature monitoring program reported the same thing.
"Approximately the same" could mean quite a bit of variation over time.
Core 1 AFAIK is always "on", running the system. Core 2 is used only
when threading algorithms invoke it. Those are partly system, partly
program driven. So Core 2 might well have enough "off" time to run a
little cooler than Core 1. Add what Charlie said, and you get apparently
large differences.

HTH
 
P

philo 

"Approximately the same" could mean quite a bit of variation over time.
Core 1 AFAIK is always "on", running the system. Core 2 is used only
when threading algorithms invoke it. Those are partly system, partly
program driven. So Core 2 might well have enough "off" time to run a
little cooler than Core 1. Add what Charlie said, and you get apparently
large differences.

HTH

I agree, in most situations core 1 is going to be used more.

Main thing is that the cpu stays within it's design parameters
 
A

athiker

I agree, in most situations core 1 is going to be used more.

Main thing is that the cpu stays within it's design parameters
Are you numbering the cores 0 through 3?
 
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W

Wolf K

So it is actually Core #2.

Core Temp numbers them that way and I figured everyone did.

Sorry for the confusion.
OP referred to a duo-core CPU. Outside of (possibly) some system-level
code, the cores are "naturally' numbered 1, 2,...

HTH
 

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