CHKDSK Failure?


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I have a "custom" built PC with:

Windows 7 Ultimate (64-bit)
Q6600 Quad Processor
4 GB DDR2 Ram
750 GB Hitachi HDD (SATA)
Nvidia 9800 Graphics card
1000watt Power supply (Black Widow)
MOBO - Don't know without looking
Air Cooled Antec case



Anyway, I had some power issues in my house and my computer was turned off abruptly at random times due to power loss. After it happening for like the 6th time, the computer freezes on the Windows (Flag) start up screen.

I used "Eurosoft: PC Check" to check my hardware and it turns out I had a read test failure on the HDD. Well this can easily be fixed by a CHKDSK fix to repair bad sectors of the HDD. However, my PC would not even boot into safe mode to run the command prompt CHKDSK.

So, in order to repair the HDD, I set it up as a static on my other ASUS built PC:

Windows 7 Home Premium (64-bit)
Intel i7 Core (8 core) Precessor
9 GB DDR3
Hitachi 7200rpm 1TB HDD
Nvidia GTX 480
1000watt Power Supply (Black Widow)
Asus MOBO
Air Cooled

and used the GeekSquad tool MRI 5.0.1 to run a CMD prompt. Typed in CHKDSK D:/r/f (D is the drive's static name) and select run. It wasn't able to dismount it and told me to run it at next start up. And so I selected "yes" and rebooted. Right off the bat in phase 1 it said it was deleting bad or corrupted sectors I believe and then continued a few minutes later into scrolling "Correcting errors in the volume Bitmap." However, I've had it running for about 33hours and it's still scrolling "Correcting errors in the volume Bitmap."

I've read the corruptions typically take a while to repair and so I've waited it out, as it IS a 750gb HDD. However, I feel it's a bit excessive and I don't know if I should interrupt it or not.

So, the question is (give me a real answer, not a copy and paste), should I stop it and rerun one? If so, what if it does it again? Or should I stop it and attempt to boot it. I fear that if it has already deleted some sectors and it hasn't repaired them yet, that booting it might actually cause MOAR (lol the geek in me) damage to the HDD.

Any Ideas?

Thanks.
 
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TrainableMan

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Per Microsoft:
Interrupting chkdsk is not recommended. However, canceling or interrupting chkdsk should not leave the volume any more corrupt than it was before chkdsk was run. Rerunning chkdsk checks and repairs any remaining corruption on the volume.

I would stop it and check it out. I'm guessing too many W7 OS files were corrupt and you will need to do a W7 reinstall with a full format. BTW: The /r told it to try to recover lost files - most people just end up just deleting them anyway.

You should spend $35-$100 and buy a decent UPS (Uninterpretable Power Supply) like APC or other brand. A small one is great for over & under voltages and for 30second power outages, bigger ones can sustain a desktop 10 minutes or more.
 

Nibiru2012

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You can use S.I.W. for gathering the motherboard's name and model. SIW is free application for personal use.

Go here to download it: SIW Without Installer (English-Only)
Download

This version is a stand alone application, which means it doesn't install to Windows, just click it and check out all its info and features.

Do as Trainable Man suggested and get a UPS - uninterruptible power supply. I have a 5 year old Belkin and it will power my system for about 15 minutes before it shuts down automatically.

A few of the nice features of a UPS is that they also act as surge protection and power filters smoothing out the power fluctuations and giving you a cleaner, more consistent voltage to your system.
 
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If you can get your hands on a copy of Spinrite, run it on the drive and it will do great for it.
 

Nibiru2012

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Does Spinrite work on x64 systems?

This is from Wikipedia:
SpinRite is written in x86 assembly language, and runs only on PC-compatible computers with 32-bit Intel or AMD x86 processor, but it can operate on any attached storage device with a compatible interface.[7] It can be run only under MS-DOS or a compatible operating system, but the operating system installed on the machine is irrelevant, as Spinrite is distributed in bootable version with the FreeDOS operating system. Version 6 is compatible with hard disks containing any logical volume management or file system such as FAT16 or 32, NTFS, Ext3 as well as other Linux File Systems, HFS+ For Mac OS X, Tivo and others, as it operates only on the disk itself. Drives attached to computers with other processors can be recovered by temporarily connecting the drive to a suitable computer.[8] Version 6 includes a Microsoft Windows utility to create a FreeDOS boot floppy disk or CD-ROM for the program.
 
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Yes, because it is run from a bootable device (floppy, USB, cd/dvd etc...).

The version of Windows installed doesn't matter, as it is not booted to, to run Spinrite.

It runs under a free version of MS-DOS, called FreeDos.
 

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