SOLVED XP Emulation Direct Draw3D unable to intialize


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Well I orginally installed W7 32 bit and after much debate I decided to reinstall using the 64 bit. The PC can handle it why not give it a shot?

So I encountered no problems with the following errors on W7 x32 Just to keep that in mind....

Now in x64 I am having a problem trying to run Starcraft and Diablo II in XP mode

After installing them on XP mode of Virtual Pc, I tried to run these apps and they had the following error...

Starcraft:


Diablo II:


I have all the right Drivers for my Display Adapter, I installed the correct version of DirectX

I am kinda stumped on this one guys and could use some help:dontknow:
 
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wikipedia.org - Windows Virtual PC

Virtual PC emulates the following environments:
  • Intel Pentium II (32-bit) processor (but virtualizes the host processor on Windows versions) with an Intel 440BX chipset.
  • Standard SVGA VESA graphics card (S3 Trio 32 PCI with 4 MB video RAM, adjustable in later versions up to 16 MB by manually editing a virtual machine's settings file).
  • System BIOS from American Megatrends (AMI).
  • Creative Labs Sound Blaster 16 ISA PnP. (When Vista is installed as both the host (main) and guest (virtual) operating systems, settings are synchronized with the host and audio configuration is not required.)
  • DEC 21041 (DEC 21140 in newer versions) Ethernet network card.
  • Microsoft Virtual PC 2007 and earlier do not have the ability to redirect USB devices to the guest machine, although devices connected to the host OS via USB can be used as normal by Virtual PC.
  • Programs using undocumented features of hardware, exotic timings, or unsupported opcodes may not work.
Are the game requirements supported under Virtual PC emulated environments?
 
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I believe so.....

They are old games so I would assume so.

I installed them on the virtual pc because they wont run on a 64bit system right?
 
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It looks as if both games require more than 4MB video memory unless I am looking at it wrong. If you have not edited Virtual PC settings manually, you may only be giving XP Mode 4MB video memory. I have no idea what problems this limitation would produce.

Starcraft:
System requirements:
  • 90 MHz processor for Windows
  • 120 Mhz processor for Mac OS
  • SVGA video card or equivalent
  • 16MB RAM (32MB recommended)
  • DirectX version 2.0 or better
  • 80MB of disk space
Diablo II:
System requirements:
  • 233 MHz Pentium or better
  • 32 MB RAM
  • 650 MB drive space
  • 4X CD-ROM drive
  • DirectX compatible video card
Here is a forum thread on the same topic.
XP Mode and Direct3D acceleration.

Wish I could be of more help. :(
 
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Ok well I'm confused I just installed the programs on Windows 7 x64 and they run perfectly...

I thought 64 bit could not run a 16bit app?
 
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That must not be a 16bit program.

64-bit versions of Windows do not support 16-bit components, 16-bit processes, or 16-bit applications
In order to run a 16-bit program or a 32-bit program that uses 16-bit processes or 16-bit components, you must install the program on a 32-bit version of Windows. In order to run such a program, you can install a 32-bit version of Windows in a dual-boot configuration with the 64-bit version of Windows. Then, you can restart your computer to the 32-bit version of Windows and install the 16-bit program or 32-bit program that uses 16-bit processes or 16-bit components.
Learn How to Spot a 16-Bit Application
Because most Windows 3.x–based programs run properly under Windows XP, it's sometimes difficult to tell 16-bit and 32-bit applications apart.

Here are two methods for determining whether an application is 16-bit or 32-bit:
  • Right-click the program's executable file and then choose Properties. If you see a Version tab, it's a 32-bit program.
  • Or, if the program is running, press Ctrl+Shift+Esc to open the Windows Task Manager. On the Processes tab, look in the Image Name column for the name of the program's executable file. If any 16-bit programs are running, you'll find an entry for Ntvdm.exe, the virtual DOS machine. Just above it in the list, you'll see indented entries for Wowexec.exe (the Windows on Windows subsystem) and the executable name of each 16-bit program running in that virtual machine.
16-bit application
A 16 bit application is any software written for MS-DOS, OS/2 1.x or early versions of Microsoft Windows which originally ran on the 16-bit Intel 8088 and Intel 80286 microprocessors. Such applications used a 20-bit or 24-bit segment or selector-offset address representation to extend the range of addressable memory locations beyond what was possible using only 16-bit addresses. Programs containing more than 216 bytes (64 kilobytes) of instructions and data therefore required special instructions to switch between their 64-kilobyte segments, increasing the complexity of programming 16-bit applications.
This seems to be very old applications.
 
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