Windows Experience Index Score


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bassfisher6522

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Seeing that this is a laptop...your options become limited. To answer your question; Yes. You can install a SSD hard drive, max out your RAM...but that's about it.
 

clifford_cooley

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Not only is bassfisher correct, improving your graphics (If it is even possible) would likely shorten your battery charge time.

If you want the power of a desktop, perhaps its a desktop you are interested in.


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Digerati

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Actually, your scores are pretty good. 5.9 for your drive is typical. Yeah, SSD will improve that, but, its a notebook. In spite of what the marketing weenies would have us believe, they are not desktop replacements. They are very powerful computers jammed in to very small spaces with virtually no wiggle room for expansion, or proper ventilation. Notebooks were initially designed for, and still are best suited as computers for road warriors. In fact for many (if not most) notebook buyers, it is all about weight, thickness, and battery life. Good performance is a given.

And there is no "ATX Form Factor" standards for notebooks so they are very proprietary (including drivers). Therefore upgrades are difficult and limited, and often much more expensive compared to a PC.

Yeah, it would be nice if your graphics score was a bit higher, but again it's a notebook and that by no means is a bad score (see note below). But even if you could put in a bigger horsepower graphics solution, because it is a notebook you could not fit the necessary cooling in the tiny case to keep those horses cool. Remember, normal size desktop and tower cases, with multiple and large (≥ 120mm) fans are still challenged to keep the interiors cooled when the hardware is being pushed.

Your 6.5 gaming graphic score is nothing to sneeze at either. That typically indicates the dedicated graphics RAM (either on card, or on the motherboard) plus shared system memory. So your graphics solution likely has 1Gb of dedicated RAM and is stealing, err... sharing another Gb. You have 4Gb of system RAM which is good with 64-bit, but with shared graphics taking some of those RAM resources, it can restrict a 64-bit OS. If your notebook supports it, swapping out your 4Gb for 8Gb will let that 64-bit OS run free and allow your graphics solution to "share" all the RAM it needs (though I don't think it would take any more) without impacting overall system performance.

Of course adding even more RAM will place greater demands on the notebooks already limited cooling capability. So you will need to be sure you keep all vents, access ports, and cavities free of heat trapping dust. And I recommend the use of a Notebook Cooling Pad w/ext. power supply. I prefer those with their own external power supplies so you don’t put more strain on the notebook, causing it to generate even more heat.

Note about WEI scores. It is not a benchmark program. I have found many users were perfectly happy with their computers - until they looked at the WEI score. They are just a general guide that Microsoft has arbitrarily set numbers to. There is no perfect 10 for example and the weighing can and has changed with technologies - as it did when SSDs became common. I personally don't like or pay much attention to the WEI. Perhaps if they did away with the base score, I might like it more but if I want to compare this machine to that machine, there are better programs specifically designed for that purpose.
 

Digerati

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Well, to be sure of compatibility, I would try to buy the same RAM as already installed.

Do note your motherboard most likely supports dual-channel memory architecture which provides, in effect, nearly double the bandwidth speeds for RAM access. However, to enable dual-channel, the RAM slots must be populated with matched "pairs" of memory sticks. So if your computer only has two RAM slots and both are now populated with 2Gb sticks for your 4Gb total, you will needed to buy 2 x 4Gb sticks to take it up to 8Gb, and start or add to your pile of old, obsolete, but still perfectly good RAM the two, now retired 2Gb sticks.
 
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Nibiru2012

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Yes, buying RAM of the same brand, series, CAS timings, etc. is highly recommended.

It's better to buy RAM as a matched set, but as long as what is specified in my first line you should be okay.
 

yodap

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I agree with the others and that is a very good score for a laptop as Digerati said.
 

clifford_cooley

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Sorry, I am not a computer nerd but can you please explain what SSD is and what it does and how does it help? Thanks
SSD's serve the same purpose as Hard Drives. SSD stands for Solid State Drive which has no mechanical parts to wear out the way traditional drives do. SSD's are much faster since there is practically no seek time involved with waiting for a platter to spin around.
 
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Digerati

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SSD's are much faster since there is practically no seek time involved with waiting for a platter to spin around
Not just that. Because the data is stored in solid-state (semi-conductors) memory devices (rather than by alignment of magnetic particles on spinning magnetic disks), not only is the data location found much more quickly, but the data reads and writes are almost instantaneous from there, too.
 
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