Windows 7, Disk Management


W

wgd.roaming

Good evening.

Plan to partition a disk such that I can install LINUX in the new
space.

Where, pls, do I find details regarding a Boot Manager, i.e. means to
select Partition 'A' or Partition 'B' and boot an OS in that
partition?

Thank You

Wayne
Sarasota
 
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P

Paul

Good evening.

Plan to partition a disk such that I can install LINUX in the new
space.

Where, pls, do I find details regarding a Boot Manager, i.e. means to
select Partition 'A' or Partition 'B' and boot an OS in that
partition?

Thank You

Wayne
Sarasota
If you install Linux second, and the Linux is modern enough to have
some inkling of what Windows 7 is, then the GRUB installation done
by Linux, should pick up the existing Windows 7 partition. Linux
will boot up and offer Windows 7 as an option in the boot menu.

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_lRdaCTUGF_M/S94_z8MkVJI/AAAAAAAAAg8/UtykxTONguE/s1600/8c_TrueCryptBootLoader.png

I suppose you can do it the other way round. After installing
Linux, you could do a Windows repair (which puts back the MBR), but
then the trick would be, whether bootmgr in Windows 7 can boot Linux
or not. I'm not up on those details.

OK, in the picture here, EasyBCD (a third party product), is being
used to add Linux to the BCD of Windows. After this, Windows 7 bootmgr
runs, and Linux would be a boot option in the menu. Note that in this
case, two physical hard drives are being used, which could be how
GRUB is left in a functional state, to be picked up by bootmgr.
If they're both on the same disk, the Win 7 bootmgr would have to
jump to the grub stage 1.5 or the like (which doesn't seem likely
to work, but you never know about these things).

http://i41.tinypic.com/2h2npc5.png

Pick the boot manager you think is most likely to work, and set it
up that way. At the moment, just installing Linux might be enough.
But then, if some day you delete Linux, you'll need to run the
repair on Windows 7, to get it booting again (as at least the MBR
will need to be fixed).

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/927392 ( maybe bootrec /fixmbr ? )

If you have a backup, you'll have no regrets...

Paul
 
F

FD

OK, in the picture here, EasyBCD (a third party product), is being
used to add Linux to the BCD of Windows.
I have been playing with various Linux distros for a few years and had no
luck in getting EasyBCD work for me.

I now play with Linux on a dedicated e-sata hard disk.

I have Ubuntu on it now.

I am convinced that linux missed the boat for the desktop just as IBM missed
the boat with OS2 Warp before win 95 was released.

FD
 
W

Wolf K

Good evening.

Plan to partition a disk such that I can install LINUX in the new
space.

Where, pls, do I find details regarding a Boot Manager, i.e. means to
select Partition 'A' or Partition 'B' and boot an OS in that
partition?

Thank You

Wayne
Sarasota

Linux includes a bootmanager. Just install Linux, for some reason it's
called grub. (Makes me think of those things that eat the lawn.) When
you boot, you'll see a choice. Mouse or arrow to it, and hit enter.
Linux will be the default OS. If you want to change that, google for help.

HTH
Wolf K.
 
B

BillW50

In
FD said:
I have been playing with various Linux distros for a few years and
had no luck in getting EasyBCD work for me.

I now play with Linux on a dedicated e-sata hard disk.

I have Ubuntu on it now.

I am convinced that linux missed the boat for the desktop just as IBM
missed the boat with OS2 Warp before win 95 was released.

FD
Yes having any sort of dualboot configuration, whether all Windows or
mixed just rubs me the wrong way. Sure if you follow the procedures it
should work just fine. But the real fun comes in when you want to
uninstall one of them. So I too keep them on separate drives and all of
those problems disappear.

Btw, I gave up on OS/2 Warp around FixPak 45. IBM proved they couldn't
patch an OS without everything going to hell.
 
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W

wgd.roaming

Odds are your Linux installer will have all you need and even offer to
set it up for you...

What is available - boot manager - to add XP to a second partition?

Wayne
 
W

Wolf K

[...]
What is available - boot manager - to add XP to a second partition?

Wayne
You can install XP on a separate partition on a Win 7 system, but that
raises the issue known as "Order of Installation". I avoided it because
I installed Win 7 on a system that already had XP on it. This is the
Correct Order of Installation. Win7 set up its bootmanager, with itself
as default. You'll have to start a new thread about how to add XP to a
Win7 system, I have no idea what glitches can/will show up.

I installed Linux (Ubuntu) after Win7. The Linux installer
_automatically_ installed the bootmanager, which is called grub. It also
set up grub to offer "Windows bootloader" as a choice, which leads to
the Win 7 bootmanager.

Just install Linux. You don't need a 3rd party boot manager. BTW, after
installing Linux, whenever you update it, older versions of Linux
("kernels") will still be available for booting, just in case the update
hiccups with your hardware/software.

FWIW, eventually I ditched Ubuntu, because its developers produced
something called the Unity desktop, which was/is a weird attempt to make
Ubuntu look like a Mac. Instead, I installed LinuxMint on my wife's old
laptop (after buying her a new one of course). It's our travel machine,
much more secure than Windows in public wi-fi hotspots, etc.

HTH
Wolf K.
 
D

DanS

On 1/11/2012, (e-mail address removed) posted:

Good evening.

Plan to partition a disk such that I can install LINUX
in the new space.
[...]
What is available - boot manager - to add XP to a second
partition?

Wayne
You can install XP on a separate partition on a Win 7
system, but that raises the issue known as "Order of
Installation". I avoided it because I installed Win 7 on a
system that already had XP on it. This is the Correct Order
of Installation. Win7 set up its bootmanager, with itself
as default. You'll have to start a new thread about how to
add XP to a Win7 system, I have no idea what glitches
can/will show up.

I installed Linux (Ubuntu) after Win7. The Linux installer
_automatically_ installed the bootmanager, which is called
grub. It also set up grub to offer "Windows bootloader" as
a choice, which leads to the Win 7 bootmanager.

Just install Linux. You don't need a 3rd party boot
manager. BTW, after installing Linux, whenever you update
it, older versions of Linux ("kernels") will still be
available for booting, just in case the update hiccups with
your hardware/software.

FWIW, eventually I ditched Ubuntu, because its developers
produced something called the Unity desktop, which was/is a
weird attempt to make Ubuntu look like a Mac. Instead, I
installed LinuxMint on my wife's old laptop (after buying
her a new one of course). It's our travel machine, much
more secure than Windows in public wi-fi hotspots, etc.
I had thought Unity was more to make it look like a
smartphone, but either way, people hate it.

I switched to Kubuntu a few years ago and have never looked
back. Once you make the desktop a "normal" desktop ie- showing
icons, it becomes far more useable.
 
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W

wgd.roaming

On 1/11/2012, (e-mail address removed) posted:

Good evening.

Plan to partition a disk such that I can install LINUX in the new
space.
[...]
What is available - boot manager - to add XP to a second partition?

Wayne
You can install XP on a separate partition on a Win 7 system, but that
raises the issue known as "Order of Installation". I avoided it because
I installed Win 7 on a system that already had XP on it. This is the
Correct Order of Installation. Win7 set up its bootmanager, with itself
as default. You'll have to start a new thread about how to add XP to a
Win7 system, I have no idea what glitches can/will show up.

I installed Linux (Ubuntu) after Win7. The Linux installer
_automatically_ installed the bootmanager, which is called grub. It also
set up grub to offer "Windows bootloader" as a choice, which leads to
the Win 7 bootmanager.

Just install Linux. You don't need a 3rd party boot manager. BTW, after
installing Linux, whenever you update it, older versions of Linux
("kernels") will still be available for booting, just in case the update
hiccups with your hardware/software.

FWIW, eventually I ditched Ubuntu, because its developers produced
something called the Unity desktop, which was/is a weird attempt to make
Ubuntu look like a Mac. Instead, I installed LinuxMint on my wife's old
laptop (after buying her a new one of course). It's our travel machine,
much more secure than Windows in public wi-fi hotspots, etc.

HTH
Wolf K.
What you say about Linux bringing its own boot mngr - memory searching
deep - recall that this was the case. Order of Install causes an
annoyance. In addition to wanting to dive into Linux (have Ubuntu in
the closet), just rcvd the Win7 Hm Pre -to- Win7 Prof upgrade. This
is to support 32-bit SW, like an older version of Quickbooks. Upgrade
made more sense in terms of $s than a far more expensive Quickbooks
upgrade. Am I waltzing a dangerous unknown, or does the Win ugrade
make sense (Linux interest notwithstanding)? [Started another thread,
re Hm Prem to Prof upgrade].

Tks
Wayne
 

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