Win 7 questions


Joined
May 25, 2010
Messages
3
Reaction score
0
So this is my first post on here as I am a new user, and I still haven't made the jump to windows 7 yet. I definitely want to, just haven't had the money yet. My biggest question for all of you is, what do you think I should do, just buy a premade pc, or custom build one? I'm probably going to custom build one, but I'm just curious as to what everyone's ideas of good builds are. I know it depends on what I will be using the computer for, but again, I'm more curious about what everyone's ideas on any kind of build are.

Thanks,
jbaughm1
 
Ad

Advertisements

catilley1092

Win 7/Linux Mint Lover
VIP Member
Joined
Nov 13, 2009
Messages
3,507
Reaction score
563
jbaughm1, welcome to the forum! Actually, I don't know how to build a computer, but do know how to replace some parts. I feel that you'll love Windows 7, once you get going. If you can build a computer, by all means, do so. You won't get all of the "crapware" that degrades your performance, as well as wasting disc space. The OEM's really load the junk onto them these days. And you said it yourself, it does depend on what your intended use of it will be. Newegg sells many packages to suit any budget or need. And if you're going to build your own, go with 64 bit, and Windows 7 Pro would probably suit you better than Home Premium would. Just a few thoughts. Post back anytime, I'm looking forward to seeing pics of your new PC.

Best of Luck,
Cat
 

clifford_cooley

VIP Member
Joined
Mar 8, 2009
Messages
5,063
Reaction score
1,184
Hi jbaughm1 - Welcome to w7forums

I think a good build is one that works for you. Everyone has different opinions on the brands they think is best. One of the best ways to weigh the differences is to compare the customers reviews between the two products in question.

Seeing how you are thinking of building a computer. I am assuming you know how to build. What are your manufacturer preferences in components? AMD or Intel? ATI or nVidia? Are you an extreme gamer? Do you prefer multiple monitors or does a single monitor work for you? What about a RAID configuration with your hard drives? All of these questions are important when it comes to deciding the most significant component in building a computer. The motherboard is and will always be the backbone to a system. Not only does the hardware depend on the motherboard for support, an OEM license for Windows essentially dies with the motherboard and against licensing agreement to transfer to a different motherboard.

Long story short, purchase the motherboard that you want the first time. If you have any questions, there are many people here and will help you get the answers you are looking for.
 

Mychael

VIP Member
Joined
Mar 17, 2010
Messages
1,132
Reaction score
101
Welcome to the forum. As already mentioned, first decide what you want to do with your machine, 2nd get current computer magazines that give product tests and see what's available. 3rd, decide on a budget. IMHO you need to be prepared to spend at least $900 to get something basic but usable, it can go up from there, plus there is the cost of a monitor to factor in.
In very general terms Gigabyte and ASUS would seem to be the best quality motherboards around and WD (western digital HDD) are pretty good.
Kingston/corsair Ram is okay, opinions vary a lot about the best video card to get but your motherboard choice might support video anyway so you can save a bit there unless you want to do hard core gaming.
Get a quality powersupply of at least 650 watts, Thermaltake and Atek are good brands, I use Thermaltake myself.
The type of motherboard you buy will determine the processor you get, I've had both AMD and Intel over the years both are fine, their models vary and they swap leads with each new release. Intel i5 and i7 core processors are popular right now.
Try to get hardware that has the best warranty, you can find some motherboards with 2yr warranty & HDD with 5yrs, some memory will be lifetime, power supplies vary from 12months to 5 yrs and video cards 1-2 yrs on average.

Have fun,

Mychael
 

catilley1092

Win 7/Linux Mint Lover
VIP Member
Joined
Nov 13, 2009
Messages
3,507
Reaction score
563
Another thing, AMD recently came out with a six core processor, the Opteron. Intel's i7-965 Extreme Edition may be in some opinions better, but it's a matter of if the extra $1,000 is worth it. The Opteron can be had from Newegg for $309, a major price break. Your motherboard is the most important part of your system, your processor is right behind that.

The bottom line is, you can build a killer computer for the money spent, compared with an OEM PC. You can probably build for $1,200 a computer that would cost $2,500 or more from an OEM.

One other thing to consider, do you plan to have a Office suite on this PC? If you do, TechNet would be a program for you to consider. For less than the full retail of Ultimate, you have access to every recent OS & Office suites that Microsoft offers. And currently, there's still a discount for the program. Plus, you get three courses per year with the program. It's a great deal, and even greater if you have a family with more than one computer.

Cat
 
Joined
May 26, 2010
Messages
36
Reaction score
6
AMD is simple and cheap for new builders:

Work PC, no encoding or gaming, go for an Athlon x2 250 and an 890GX motherboard with a 5670

Gaming PC, go for a six core thuban and an 890FX motherboard with a 5870 or 5970

Encoding PC, go for an Athlon x4 635 and an 890GX motherboard. If you can spare the cash, use a thuban, otherwise the x4 Athlon's are fine, with a 5670.

Otherwise put in 4GB RAM DDR3 1333MHz minimum and a quality PSU; I would recommend only 5 brands - Enermax, Corsair, Seasonic, Antec, PC Power and Cooling. Rest are not worth your time. Also partial to Xigmatek.

Pre built PC's are rubbish.
 
Ad

Advertisements

Nibiru2012

Quick Scotty, beam me up!
VIP Member
Joined
Oct 27, 2009
Messages
4,955
Reaction score
1,302
jbaughm1 - Welcome to the Windows 7 Forums website! :ciao:

Both AMD and Intel are excellent CPU makers. AMD is less expensive and they make some very good processors, Intel does too.

I was an AMD guy for years and this last build I went with Intel because I do lots of video processing and editing, which Intel does just a little better and faster.

Be sure to get a good quality motherboard, that's the heart of the system. ASUS, Gigabyte, DFI LanParty and MSI all make very good motherboards.

I'm partial to Gigabyte, but that's my opinion. Stay away from ECS and Biostar.

A good power supply is a definite must, The ones mentioned in the previous post are all top-notch quality power supplies. I happen to use a Bgears Tarantula which is another top quality PSU. It got very good reviews on the sites I checked.

Cooler Master, Muskin, and ThermalTake are also good.

The PSU should be at least an: ATX12V / EPS12V 80 PLUS BRONZE Certified Power Supply. Try to get one that is a modular design, which means that you only need to hook up the power cables you actually are going to use. Makes for a much cleaner install and build with no unnecessary cables in the way.

Go to review sites such as AnandTech, Legion Hardware, HardOCP, Overclocker's Club, TechRadar UK, Hardware Canucks, and so on. Read the reviews and make your decisions accordingly.

If you need any more help or guidance feel free to ask at anytime.
 
Joined
May 26, 2010
Messages
36
Reaction score
6
jbaughm1 - Welcome to the Windows 7 Forums website! :ciao:

Both AMD and Intel are excellent CPU makers. AMD is less expensive and they make some very good processors, Intel does too.

I was an AMD guy for years and this last build I went with Intel because I do lots of video processing and editing, which Intel does just a little better and faster.

Be sure to get a good quality motherboard, that's the heart of the system. ASUS, Gigabyte, DFI LanParty and MSI all make very good motherboards.

I'm partial to Gigabyte, but that's my opinion. Stay away from ECS and Biostar.

A good power supply is a definite must, The ones mentioned in the previous post are all top-notch quality power supplies. I happen to use a Bgears Tarantula which is another top quality PSU. It got very good reviews on the sites I checked.

Cooler Master, Muskin, and ThermalTake are also good.

The PSU should be at least an: ATX12V / EPS12V 80 PLUS BRONZE Certified Power Supply. Try to get one that is a modular design, which means that you only need to hook up the power cables you actually are going to use. Makes for a much cleaner install and build with no unnecessary cables in the way.

Go to review sites such as AnandTech, Legion Hardware, HardOCP, Overclocker's Club, TechRadar UK, Hardware Canucks, and so on. Read the reviews and make your decisions accordingly.

If you need any more help or guidance feel free to ask at anytime.
Coolermaster isn't that good, and Intel a bit faster? A thuban will shatter your video encoding.
 

Nibiru2012

Quick Scotty, beam me up!
VIP Member
Joined
Oct 27, 2009
Messages
4,955
Reaction score
1,302
We're all just merely stating basically opinions here, okay?

Sheesh, take a chill pill.
 

TrainableMan

^ The World's First ^
Moderator
Joined
May 10, 2010
Messages
9,342
Reaction score
1,584
And I read in some other posts that a good power supply is very important, so if you are building it, then make sure you have a stable PSU capable of powering everything else!
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
May 25, 2010
Messages
3
Reaction score
0
wow thanks for all the advice guys. i'll definitely take all that in to consideration before i build. I'm glad i posted on here, there is such a wealth of knowledge that can help many people out. Again, thanks guys and whenever(which might be a little while) i build one, i'll definitely post the specs.
 

Nibiru2012

Quick Scotty, beam me up!
VIP Member
Joined
Oct 27, 2009
Messages
4,955
Reaction score
1,302
wow thanks for all the advice guys. i'll definitely take all that in to consideration before i build. I'm glad i posted on here, there is such a wealth of knowledge that can help many people out. Again, thanks guys and whenever(which might be a little while) i build one, i'll definitely post the specs.
We're glad we were able to help you in any small way.

Remember to check hardware reviews if you're not sure of which to get, or if you have questions.

We look forward to seeing what you decided to do.
 
Joined
Feb 16, 2010
Messages
61
Reaction score
12
Hello jbaughm1,


I will tell you from first hand experience, all of my systems have been converted to Windows 7. I am not just saying it to say because I am affiliated with Microsoft. I can truly stand behind this product and tell you straight away it works very reliably, fast and extremely stable. The 64bit version is a real powerhouse as well.
Anyways, what to say about Windows 7?

There are several new features that are available with Windows 7 that will assist you with deployment and management of a large number of workstations. Enterprise IT infrastructures are increasingly complex to manage. The Microsoft Desktop Optimization Pack (MDOP) is a dynamic desktop solution that is available as a subscription for Software Assurance customers. The solution suite enhances application deployment and compatibility, increases IT responsiveness and end user uptime, and helps reduce total cost of ownership (TCO) of your desktop software and IT management. To learn more about this package, please go here: bit.ly/KzkwM

Also now available is MDT 2010 (Microsoft Deployment Tool) which will help you create images and automate the OS and application installations, data migration, and desktop configuration process. To learn more, please go here: bit.ly/GZnEY


Also, if you would like to read what other users have said about their positive experience with Windows 7, you may want to check out the following sites: http://tinyurl.com/5tfr8 and http://tinyurl.com/nsm3s
 
John M
Microsoft Windows Client Team
 
 
 
 
 
Joined
Jun 14, 2010
Messages
1
Reaction score
0
corrupted registry of windows 7 64 bit with optimizer from stopzilla folks

Hi all

my first post so bear with me. used registry optimizer from the stopzilla company and wiped out the registry of the 64 bit windows 7. they told me not to use it but I wanted to see if it was possible, didn't know it would stop me from rebooting again after doing the registry defrag. can I reinstall and repair with install cd or dvd. thanks all just trying to save data that's on computer so don't want to reinstall, I hope repair would work but never installed windows 7 before
 

Nibiru2012

Quick Scotty, beam me up!
VIP Member
Joined
Oct 27, 2009
Messages
4,955
Reaction score
1,302
Hi all

my first post so bear with me. used registry optimizer from the stopzilla company and wiped out the registry of the 64 bit windows 7. they told me not to use it but I wanted to see if it was possible, didn't know it would stop me from rebooting again after doing the registry defrag. can I reinstall and repair with install cd or dvd. thanks all just trying to save data that's on computer so don't want to reinstall, I hope repair would work but never installed windows 7 before
Welcome to The Windows 7 Forums website - rudycfls! :ciao:

You should be able to do a repair with the install DVD, sometimes it doesn't work out that way. I hope it does because reinstalling can be time-consuming and a general pain in the rear!

However, if you have to reinstall Windows 7, it quite easy you just have to be sure and have all the correct drivers for your hardware on hand before you do the install. Save the drivers to a thumb drive, external hard drive or burn them to a CD-RW disc.

If you have a desktop, it's usually best to install the motherboard's chipset drivers first, then graphics drives, NIC / LAN drivers, etc.

If you look through some of the threads here, you'll see that most of us here don't use "registry cleaners" so to speak. Most of us will usually use CCleaner because it rip the registry to shreds, just gets rid of the superfluous stuff.
 
Ad

Advertisements

fab

Joined
Jun 20, 2010
Messages
9
Reaction score
1
If you decide to build...
Nail the motherboard you want 'the most' for whatever reason and then the cpu. Don't compromise on the motherboard or the cpu. They will likely be in your system the longest and will largely define your performance limits.

You can add or swap most other items fairly easily at any time: graphics adapters, memory, hard disks and all sorts of other peripheral devices. It's not that big a deal to do so. But it is a major deal to swap out your cpu or your motherboard, not impossible, but not a simple drop-in like the other devices.

I've built over 50 machines for myself and my colleagues since the mid 80's. I've always been able to beat the market, so to speak, ending up with a screamer on all performance measures long before prices dropped enough to beat my costs. Plus, I really know what's inside my 'box.'

best of luck on this endeavor and v/r,

fab

Buy your software honestly so you don't end up with support issues. Aside from the morality issue of cheating, you can be in for huge headaches when your system starts to act up and you have some 'unregisterable' stuff on your machine. In the end it just isn't worth it to try shortcutting on the software, particularly the OS.
 

fab

Joined
Jun 20, 2010
Messages
9
Reaction score
1
Nibiru2012,

Please clarify. I confuse easily:
If you look through some of the threads here, you'll see that most of us here don't use "registry cleaners" so to speak. Most of us will usually use CCleaner because it rip the registry to shreds, just gets rid of the superfluous stuff.
Are you saying you do use CCleaner and that you do let it 'rip the registry to shreds' or do you mean you don't use CCleaner? The way it is worded sounds like it goes against itself and that confuses me.

I hope replying this way to a post is not out of line with forum decorum.
 

Mychael

VIP Member
Joined
Mar 17, 2010
Messages
1,132
Reaction score
101
Nibiru2012,
Please clarify. I confuse easily:
Are you saying you do use CCleaner and that you do let it 'rip the registry to shreds' or do you mean you don't use CCleaner? The way it is worded sounds like it goes against itself and that confuses me.
I hope replying this way to a post is not out of line with forum decorum.

Nib's made a 'typo' CCleaner IS the one to go for, it wont rip up your registry. It seems to be the mostly consistently reliable of the cleaners. We've all used others with good effect but CCleaner is the safest.

Mychael
 
  • Like
Reactions: fab
Ad

Advertisements


Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top