Where does Windows 7 hide files?


R

richard

One of the things I dislike about Windows 7 is that it hides files and one can
waste a lot of time trying to find them.

The latest one that it has done this to is an update to Acronis.

I downloaded it yesterday, all 250 or so megabytes of it, and i can't find the
file. I can find the download of the previous version in the C:\Download
directory, where, if I remember correctly I asked it to put downloaded files.

When I run Acronis, it tells me there is an updated version ready to install,
but I cannot find the file.

Any hints about where I could look?
Look in the "Program files" marked with "x86".
sometimes the folder name will be different from the program name.
try looking for the company name.
 
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S

Steve Hayes

One of the things I dislike about Windows 7 is that it hides files and one can
waste a lot of time trying to find them.

The latest one that it has done this to is an update to Acronis.

I downloaded it yesterday, all 250 or so megabytes of it, and i can't find the
file. I can find the download of the previous version in the C:\Download
directory, where, if I remember correctly I asked it to put downloaded files.

When I run Acronis, it tells me there is an updated version ready to install,
but I cannot find the file.

Any hints about where I could look?
 
N

Nil

One of the things I dislike about Windows 7 is that it hides files
and one can waste a lot of time trying to find them.

The latest one that it has done this to is an update to Acronis.

I downloaded it yesterday, all 250 or so megabytes of it, and i
can't find the file. I can find the download of the previous
version in the C:\Download directory, where, if I remember
correctly I asked it to put downloaded files.

When I run Acronis, it tells me there is an updated version ready
to install, but I cannot find the file.

Any hints about where I could look?
Use another search tool rather than Windows's built-in one. I find it
difficult to use and not very accurate.

I like Everything Search: <http://www.voidtools.com/>

and Agent Ransack
<http://www.mythicsoft.com/page.aspx?type=agentransack&page=home>

I have them both installed. Agent Ransack has more options and is able
to search file contents, size, date, etc., but it is slower than...

Everything only searches file names, but it's VERY fast. Since I'm
looking for files by name 95% of the time, that's the one that gets
used most.
 
G

Gene E. Bloch

One of the things I dislike about Windows 7 is that it hides files and one
can waste a lot of time trying to find them.
The latest one that it has done this to is an update to Acronis.
I downloaded it yesterday, all 250 or so megabytes of it, and i can't find
the file. I can find the download of the previous version in the C:\Download
directory, where, if I remember correctly I asked it to put downloaded files.
When I run Acronis, it tells me there is an updated version ready to install,
but I cannot find the file.
Any hints about where I could look?
Did you look in Acronis's menus?

Frequently what you want will be in Help - Check for updates, but
Acronis might do it differently.
 
P

Paul

Steve said:
One of the things I dislike about Windows 7 is that it hides files and one can
waste a lot of time trying to find them.

The latest one that it has done this to is an update to Acronis.

I downloaded it yesterday, all 250 or so megabytes of it, and i can't find the
file. I can find the download of the previous version in the C:\Download
directory, where, if I remember correctly I asked it to put downloaded files.

When I run Acronis, it tells me there is an updated version ready to install,
but I cannot find the file.

Any hints about where I could look?
I can get the Windows "dir" command to make a nice file list, but it doesn't
list file sizes. Run from an elevated command prompt (cmd.exe , then "Run as Administrator").

dir /B /S/ c:\ > output.txt

Maybe there is some way to get file sizes with another option, but I gave up on it.
At the very least, it seems to be able to list things just below c: (with the
conspicuous exception of C:\System Volume Information).

The other tools for listing a disk, is the Sysinternals "contig" program. This is a
side effect of the program, rather than it's main purpose. Note that the 2011 version
was butchered to remove this capability, so we have to download an old copy. I tested
a 2006, a 2008, and a 2011 version, and the 2006 and 2008 ones were OK.

http://wayback.archive.org/web/20060315000000*/http://download.sysinternals.com/Files/Contig.zip

Same deal, open a Command Prompt window, and run something like this:

contig -v -a -s c:\ > output2.txt

On my laptop, that produced a 44MB output2.txt file, to be opened with
a text editor.

This is the output format from contig. Not very useful, unless data mined programmatically.

------------------------
Processing c:\\Windows\winsxs\x86_wwf-system.workflow.activities_31bf3856ad364e35_6.1.7601.17514_none_346d5ccdd640c664\System.Workflow.Activities.dll:
Scanning file...
File size: 1142784 bytes

c:\\Windows\winsxs\x86_wwf-system.workflow.activities_31bf3856ad364e35_6.1.7601.17514_none_346d5ccdd640c664\System.Workflow.Activities.dll is in 1 fragment
------------------------

It gives a file path and a file size, and if you're desperate enough,
maybe that's enough.

Paul
 
G

Gene E. Bloch

I can get the Windows "dir" command to make a nice file list, but it doesn't
list file sizes. Run from an elevated command prompt (cmd.exe , then "Run as
Administrator").
dir /B /S/ c:\ > output.txt
Maybe there is some way to get file sizes with another option, but I gave up
on it.
At the very least, it seems to be able to list things just below c: (with the
conspicuous exception of C:\System Volume Information).
That was confusing here: my newsreader thinks slashes mean italics :)

Without the B switch, I get file sizes.

Another alternative is a file-size graphical display, such as
WindDirStat or SequoiaView:

http://sourceforge.net/projects/windirstat/

http://w3.win.tue.nl/en/research/research_computer_science/visualization/sequoiaview/

These days I like the first one better, but both are OK. They aren't
useful if you're looking for a small file, though :)
 
G

Gene E. Bloch

That was confusing here: my newsreader thinks slashes mean italics :)
Without the B switch, I get file sizes.
Another alternative is a file-size graphical display, such as WindDirStat or
SequoiaView:


These days I like the first one better, but both are OK. They aren't useful
if you're looking for a small file, though :)
While I think of it, another switch for the dir command is /O which
sets the sort order. For example,

dir /S /O-S .

would sort the current directory (.), and in turn each subdirectory, in
reverse order by size (the - sign reverses the order).
 
E

Evan Platt

Look in the "Program files" marked with "x86".
You mean the directory C:\Program Files (x86) ?
sometimes the folder name will be different from the program name.
try looking for the company name.
richard, it's best you stick to asking questions, not trying to answer
them.
 
E

Evan Platt

One of the things I dislike about Windows 7 is that it hides files and one can
waste a lot of time trying to find them.

The latest one that it has done this to is an update to Acronis.

I downloaded it yesterday, all 250 or so megabytes of it, and i can't find the
file. I can find the download of the previous version in the C:\Download
directory, where, if I remember correctly I asked it to put downloaded files.

When I run Acronis, it tells me there is an updated version ready to install,
but I cannot find the file.

Any hints about where I could look?
Well, it doesn't really have to do with Windows, that's an Acronis
issue :)

Easiest thing is download Total commander - a very nice file manager
program from http://www.ghisler.com/ ..

Then, navigate to C:\, (assuming you saved it to your C drive) hit
Alt-F7 to search, advanced, search for larger than say 200 MB, and
date in the last <X> days from when you downloaded it. Give it a few
minutes to find the file
 
P

Paul in Houston TX

Nil said:
Use another search tool rather than Windows's built-in one. I find it
difficult to use and not very accurate.

I like Everything Search: <http://www.voidtools.com/>

and Agent Ransack
<http://www.mythicsoft.com/page.aspx?type=agentransack&page=home>

I have them both installed. Agent Ransack has more options and is able
to search file contents, size, date, etc., but it is slower than...

Everything only searches file names, but it's VERY fast. Since I'm
looking for files by name 95% of the time, that's the one that gets
used most.
Thanks Nil. I just installed Everything Search. Its very fast
and does what I want. I found the native 7 search worthless.
 
C

Char Jackson

One of the things I dislike about Windows 7 is that it hides files and one can
waste a lot of time trying to find them.
You're kidding, of course. :) I'm happy it doesn't do that.
The latest one that it has done this to is an update to Acronis.

I downloaded it yesterday, all 250 or so megabytes of it, and i can't find the
file. I can find the download of the previous version in the C:\Download
directory, where, if I remember correctly I asked it to put downloaded files.

When I run Acronis, it tells me there is an updated version ready to install,
but I cannot find the file.

Any hints about where I could look?
Try to remember which program you used to download the update, then go
to that program and see where downloads get stored. If your memory is
really bad, (you wouldn't be the only one), you can always write it
down on a sticky note and hang it on the edge of your monitor.
 
R

R. C. White

Hi, Steve

As suggested by others, the old DOS command "dir", from before "directories"
became "folders", still works fine - and often faster than Win7's Search
command.

Just open a Command Prompt window and type at the prompt: dir /?

As with other commands in a Command Prompt window, the /? switch will
produce what I call a "mini-Help" listing of the switches and parameters
available for that command. As you will see, the /b (or /B - case doesn't
matter) switch for dir produces a Bare directory listing, omitting the file
size and other information you might need or want.

To start with an extreme example, dir /s will produce a listing of every
file in every folder from your starting point to the bottom of that folder
tree. Use <Ctrl>+C, the ancient Break command, to stop the listing or it
might run for hours on a big partition!

Use drive letters and folder names to restrict the search to the locations
where the file might be. Either use the CD (Change Directory) command to
start there, or specify the path in the dir command line: dir c:\downloads

If you know part (or all) of the filename, include that in the dir command,
using "?" as a wildcard for a single character and "*" for a string of
characters. To find "MyLostFile", you might use dir mylo* Or even dir
c:\mylostfile /s/a - which will list every file by that name on that drive,
no matter which directory (folder) it might be in.

If you don't know any of the name but you know the approximate size, you
could use: dir C:\downloads /os - which would list the files by size,
smallest first, or dir /o-s - which will list the largest first.

As they say, The possibilities are endless! ;^) We old-timers who started
with MS-DOS (or before) think of this as Computer Kindergarten.

This little tutorial could go on and on, but it's best if you open a Command
Prompt window and start experimenting with the Dir command - and learning by
doing, not just for today but for the future.

RC
--
R. C. White, CPA
San Marcos, TX
(e-mail address removed)
Microsoft Windows MVP (2002-2010)
Windows Live Mail 2011 (Build 15.4.3538.0513) in Win7 Ultimate x64 SP1


"Steve Hayes" wrote in message

One of the things I dislike about Windows 7 is that it hides files and one
can
waste a lot of time trying to find them.

The latest one that it has done this to is an update to Acronis.

I downloaded it yesterday, all 250 or so megabytes of it, and i can't find
the
file. I can find the download of the previous version in the C:\Download
directory, where, if I remember correctly I asked it to put downloaded
files.

When I run Acronis, it tells me there is an updated version ready to
install,
but I cannot find the file.

Any hints about where I could look?
 
C

Char Jackson

I can get the Windows "dir" command to make a nice file list, but it doesn't
list file sizes.

Run from an elevated command prompt (cmd.exe , then "Run as Administrator").

dir /B /S/ c:\ > output.txt

Maybe there is some way to get file sizes with another option, but I gave up on it.
Look again, it does list file sizes by default unless you use a switch
to suppress that field.
 
G

Gene E. Bloch

This little tutorial could go on and on, but it's best if you open a Command
Prompt window and start experimenting with the Dir command - and learning by
doing, not just for today but for the future.
Nice advice!
 
N

nomail

One of the things I dislike about Windows 7 is that it hides files and one can
waste a lot of time trying to find them.

The latest one that it has done this to is an update to Acronis.

I downloaded it yesterday, all 250 or so megabytes of it, and i can't find the
file. I can find the download of the previous version in the C:\Download
directory, where, if I remember correctly I asked it to put downloaded files.

When I run Acronis, it tells me there is an updated version ready to install,
but I cannot find the file.

Any hints about where I could look?
Somewhat OT, but get a decent, free, file manager with a 'file
finder' function. There are plenty available and you'll never
regret it.

Pete
 
E

Evan Platt

Somewhat OT, but get a decent, free, file manager with a 'file
finder' function. There are plenty available and you'll never
regret it.

Pete
Yep, see my recommendation for Total Commander. Great product.
 
J

J. P. Gilliver (John)

Evan Platt said:
You mean the directory C:\Program Files (x86) ?
Yes, that's what he meant.
richard, it's best you stick to asking questions, not trying to answer
them.
I see no reason for that comment; it is perfectly true that many
software houses store their software under their house name (though
usually in a subfolder under the prog.'s name below that).
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G.5AL-IS-P--Ch++(p)Ar@T0H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

I don't even use words like 'environment'. People live in /the world/. The
'environment' is the kind of place where people wear 'apparel' instead of
clothes. - Billy Connolly, in Radio Times, 14-20 February 2009
 
J

Jeff Layman

Yep, see my recommendation for Total Commander. Great product.
+1. It's a bit overpowering at first as there are so many options.

Are you running the x64 version (XE v0.0.0.550)? That is an improvement
over the 32-bit version as if you need something back from the recycle
bin, it lists the full file name, rather than a dos 8+3 name.

One problem I found was that with the default install, when a folder or
file name was left-clicked it went completely black - the name was
unreadable! I was able to change that in "Settings", but I did wonder
why it was that way by default.
 
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P

Paul

Steve said:
One of the things I dislike about Windows 7 is that it hides files and one can
waste a lot of time trying to find them.

The latest one that it has done this to is an update to Acronis.

I downloaded it yesterday, all 250 or so megabytes of it, and i can't find the
file. I can find the download of the previous version in the C:\Download
directory, where, if I remember correctly I asked it to put downloaded files.

When I run Acronis, it tells me there is an updated version ready to install,
but I cannot find the file.

Any hints about where I could look?
According to this article, one of the Acronis updates ends up in

%TMP%\AcronisUpdates

http://kb.acronis.com/content/27297

If you do find the file, post back where it was located.

Paul
 

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