Weird install


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OK to be fair I've been having "issues". I assembled a new system and installed windows 7 home premium retail on it.
Then the board failed to burn in properly or the CPU failed ( Couldn't tell which) so I returned both got another of each and installed windows and rant it for a few days and the onboard the sound died and I returned that board kept the CPU and got a THIRD board.

ARRRGGGHHH
You can imagine my frustration.
Anyway I installed the third board and just booted to my Hard Drive and Lo everything was there Apparently it was because the CPU was the same as the last time I installed it. But The system wanted to reactivate so I punched in the product key and the bleedin' stinkin' thing rejected it. Several tries later like that dammed plastic goldfish I kept going round and failing.
So I went with the goofy Telephone Tag product activation.
That worked, but for CRIMINIE's sake Man.

Was it the multiple installations and different CPUs that triggered this?
Will my product key always fail in the future because of this? ?
 
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Interesting article, thank you.

However - - - "yes" to which question?
 
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Shintaro

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Most changes to hardware will require a check of the software license. Because from the software's point of view it is being installed on new hardware, maybe another machine. Which would be illegal.
Was it the multiple installations and different CPUs that triggered this?
Yes! You changed the CPU and MB (Motherboard).
Will my product key always fail in the future because of this? ?
Yes! So most likely you will need to ring MS every time you make a hardware change in the future.

The actual algorithm that Microsoft uses is not disclosed, but we do know the weighting of components is as follows, from highest to lowest:

1. Motherboard (and CPU)
2. Hard drive
3. Network interface card (NIC)
4. Graphics card
5. RAM

If you just add a new hard disk or add new RAM, there is no issue. If you create an image of your Windows 7 installation on another hard disk and swap that hard disk into the system and boot from it, or if you replace all your RAM and reboot, WAT gets triggered and checks to see whether you must reactivate Windows 7.
 

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