Student copy


M

Metspitzer

I am 51 and disabled, but I have always wanted to learn C. I have
always wanted to get the student discount on Windows. I notice that
the deal is for an upgrade. I want to build a machine so I am not
able to upgrade.

What is the best way to get Windows 7?

Also, my current machine has Windows 7 Home Premium. I already
discovered that I am limited in two ways. The first is not being able
to back up to a network drive and the second is not being able to run
in Win XP mode. Is the student copy what ever the unrestricted
version is?
 
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G

Gene E. Bloch

I am 51 and disabled, but I have always wanted to learn C. I have
always wanted to get the student discount on Windows. I notice that
the deal is for an upgrade. I want to build a machine so I am not
able to upgrade.
What is the best way to get Windows 7?
There might also be a discounted student price for the full version
(just guessing).
Also, my current machine has Windows 7 Home Premium. I already
discovered that I am limited in two ways. The first is not being able
to back up to a network drive and the second is not being able to run
in Win XP mode. Is the student copy what ever the unrestricted
version is?
I expect the student copy is home premium, but you can find out as
easily as I can, I bet.

You *can* run XP on Home Premium if:

1. You have a valid (unused or uninstalled) full license for XP

2. You are willing to download and install VMware Player or Oracle
Virtual Box. Both are free.

I like the VMware better. Also - I haven't had good luck with the
Microsoft XP mode on this Win 7 Pro system - in fact, I wish I'd saved
a few dollars and stayed with Home Premium. Oh well...
 
M

Metspitzer

There might also be a discounted student price for the full version
(just guessing).


I expect the student copy is home premium, but you can find out as
easily as I can, I bet.

You *can* run XP on Home Premium if:

1. You have a valid (unused or uninstalled) full license for XP

2. You are willing to download and install VMware Player or Oracle
Virtual Box. Both are free.

I like the VMware better. Also - I haven't had good luck with the
Microsoft XP mode on this Win 7 Pro system - in fact, I wish I'd saved
a few dollars and stayed with Home Premium. Oh well...
Thanks.
 
C

choro

There might also be a discounted student price for the full version
(just guessing).


I expect the student copy is home premium, but you can find out as
easily as I can, I bet.

You *can* run XP on Home Premium if:

1. You have a valid (unused or uninstalled) full license for XP
In true M$ tradition. Buy 2 licences for 1 computer! Brilliant! That's
the way to make money for M$! Like having your cake and eating it too!
 
C

charlie

I am 51 and disabled, but I have always wanted to learn C. I have
always wanted to get the student discount on Windows. I notice that
the deal is for an upgrade. I want to build a machine so I am not
able to upgrade.

What is the best way to get Windows 7?

Also, my current machine has Windows 7 Home Premium. I already
discovered that I am limited in two ways. The first is not being able
to back up to a network drive and the second is not being able to run
in Win XP mode. Is the student copy what ever the unrestricted
version is?
I usually go to newegg.com, and buy a full win 7 pro version, either OEM
or retail. You may be able to buy a "bundle" that can save a bit on a
build your own.

If you really want to learn "C", MS has a "free" but somewhat limited
version of MS C++ or whatever the current version is. At various times
the free version has been feature or time limited.

My all-time favorite was "Power C", but those days are long gone.
 
P

Paul

Metspitzer said:
I am 51 and disabled, but I have always wanted to learn C. I have
always wanted to get the student discount on Windows. I notice that
the deal is for an upgrade. I want to build a machine so I am not
able to upgrade.

What is the best way to get Windows 7?

Also, my current machine has Windows 7 Home Premium. I already
discovered that I am limited in two ways. The first is not being able
to back up to a network drive and the second is not being able to run
in Win XP mode. Is the student copy what ever the unrestricted
version is?
Are you sure you can't come up with a way to do a backup,
without the build-in backup function ? I'm not an expert on
backup software, and haven't reviewed them. But take a look
around, and it's possible you can find a replacement more
to your liking.

http://www.macrium.com/ReflectFree.asp

Not having a WinXP mode is a nuisance, but the pricing
of the different Windows 7 versions, makes it more like
buying an OS, when you buy a high enough version to get WinXP
mode.

You say you've always wanted to learn C. If you use one of the
tools Gene suggested (virtual machine software), combined with
a free Linux distro, you get a GCC compiler with that. And it's
a perfectly good environment for writing C programs. With a virtual
machine, you're running two OSes at the same time. (Windows 7
is your host, while the Linux OS would be a "guest" in the virtual
machine.)

An important feature in a virtual environment, would be desktop
integration. For example, drag and drop of files from one environment
to the other, is pretty important. And having the copy/paste buffer
work between environments is also important. When I use Linux
in VPC2007, those features are broken. But it's possible another
brand of virtual machine, does a better job of that.

The mere process of getting around the limitations placed on
you by Microsoft, is an education in itself :)

Paul
 
D

Dave \Crash\ Dummy

Metspitzer said:
I am 51 and disabled, but I have always wanted to learn C. I have
always wanted to get the student discount on Windows. I notice that
the deal is for an upgrade. I want to build a machine so I am not
able to upgrade.

What is the best way to get Windows 7?

Also, my current machine has Windows 7 Home Premium. I already
discovered that I am limited in two ways. The first is not being
able to back up to a network drive and the second is not being able
to run in Win XP mode. Is the student copy what ever the
unrestricted version is?
I have the academic (student) version of Windows 7 installed. Mine is
"Windows 7 Ultimate x64," but I don't know if all academic releases are
the same. While it is an upgrade version, it is possible to install it
on a virgin machine. Basically, you have to install it twice. First, do
a custom install from the bootable DVD, but DO NOT ACTIVATE. Then install
it again as an upgrade to the first installation. Now you can go through
the registration/activation process. There is another method involving
diddling with the registry, but I have not tried it. I strongly recommend
doing a Google search for "clean install windows 7 upgrade" and reading
several different tips. I don't classify myself as an expert. Just
lucky. :)
 
R

ray

I am 51 and disabled, but I have always wanted to learn C. I have
always wanted to get the student discount on Windows. I notice that the
deal is for an upgrade. I want to build a machine so I am not able to
upgrade.

What is the best way to get Windows 7?

Also, my current machine has Windows 7 Home Premium. I already
discovered that I am limited in two ways. The first is not being able
to back up to a network drive and the second is not being able to run in
Win XP mode. Is the student copy what ever the unrestricted version is?
I don't see anywhere that you actually claim to qualify for a student
discount.

There used to be folks who would sell an OEM version for a lesser price
with virtually any piece of hardware - don't know if that's still true.

Another option would be to use a free Linux distribution which will cost
you nothing and comes with C/C++ compiler and a lot of other included
software.
 
R

ray

I am 51 and disabled, but I have always wanted to learn C. I have
always wanted to get the student discount on Windows. I notice that the
deal is for an upgrade. I want to build a machine so I am not able to
upgrade.

What is the best way to get Windows 7?

Also, my current machine has Windows 7 Home Premium. I already
discovered that I am limited in two ways. The first is not being able
to back up to a network drive and the second is not being able to run in
Win XP mode. Is the student copy what ever the unrestricted version is?
I don't see anywhere that you actually claim to qualify for a student
discount.

There used to be folks who would sell an OEM version for a lesser price
with virtually any piece of hardware - don't know if that's still true.

Another option would be to use a free Linux distribution which will cost
you nothing and comes with C/C++ compiler and a lot of other included
software.
 
B

Bob Hatch

There might also be a discounted student price for the full version
(just guessing).


I expect the student copy is home premium, but you can find out as
easily as I can, I bet.

You *can* run XP on Home Premium if:

1. You have a valid (unused or uninstalled) full license for XP

2. You are willing to download and install VMware Player or Oracle
Virtual Box. Both are free.

I like the VMware better. Also - I haven't had good luck with the
Microsoft XP mode on this Win 7 Pro system - in fact, I wish I'd saved a
few dollars and stayed with Home Premium. Oh well...
What kind of problems are you having. I'm running XP Mode on my Win 7
Pro machine and so far everything I've tired to run on it works.

Knock on wood. :)


--
I respect that you have an opinion. Don't confuse that
respect with really giving a crap what it is.
"Anon"
http://www.bobhatch.com
http://www.tdsrvresort.com
 
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G

Gene E. Bloch

What kind of problems are you having. I'm running XP Mode on my Win 7 Pro
machine and so far everything I've tired to run on it works.
Knock on wood. :)
Basically this: not everything I tried to run on it worked :)

I have a some aging programmable remote controls that have no Win 7
drivers. They were not all supported by XP Mode.

I also found it more awkward in some ways than VMware, but since I only
used it for a few days a month ago, I no longer recall any details to
share with you, sorry.
 
G

Gene E. Bloch

In true M$ tradition. Buy 2 licences for 1 computer! Brilliant! That's the
way to make money for M$! Like having your cake and eating it too!
You are close to bringing out my ad-hominem side.
 
G

Gene E. Bloch

You say you've always wanted to learn C. If you use one of the
tools Gene suggested (virtual machine software), combined with
a free Linux distro, you get a GCC compiler with that. And it's
a perfectly good environment for writing C programs. With a virtual
machine, you're running two OSes at the same time. (Windows 7
is your host, while the Linux OS would be a "guest" in the virtual
machine.)
That's a great idea, IMO.

Only problem is if Metspitzer wants to program using the Windows API.
That might be hard :)
 
P

Paul

Gene said:
That's a great idea, IMO.

Only problem is if Metspitzer wants to program using the Windows API.
That might be hard :)
If you were taking a C programming course, which was covering the
basics (walking through the statement types and concepts), then
GCC should be OK.

If, on the other hand, it was a Windows programming course, then
a Windows environment would make sense. A proper development
environment, can make you feel heroic when you write your
"Hello World" example. Whereas, if you were writing for Windows,
with little in the way of support, it could be pages of code
to get your first program to run. So if in a Windows environment,
with a Windows target, then a development environment makes a lot
of sense.

My programming experience is mainly writing "dumb utilities", translators
and the like. And I don't do enough programming, to remember how to
do it, the next time I need it :) That's why my copy of K&R is
so thumb-worn. Need to "refresh" too much...

Paul
 
M

Metspitzer

What kind of problems are you having. I'm running XP Mode on my Win 7
Pro machine and so far everything I've tired to run on it works.

Knock on wood. :)
Well I haven't tried yet. I just remember reading something about
Home Premium being limited and noted it for future.
 
1

10_4

Dave "Crash" Dummy said:
I have the academic (student) version of Windows 7 installed. Mine is
"Windows 7 Ultimate x64," but I don't know if all academic releases are
the same. While it is an upgrade version, it is possible to install it
on a virgin machine. Basically, you have to install it twice. First, do
a custom install from the bootable DVD, but DO NOT ACTIVATE. Then install
it again as an upgrade to the first installation. Now you can go through
the registration/activation process. There is another method involving
diddling with the registry, but I have not tried it. I strongly recommend
doing a Google search for "clean install windows 7 upgrade" and reading
several different tips. I don't classify myself as an expert. Just lucky.
:)
--
Crash

"The fewer the facts, the stronger the opinion."
~ Arnold H. Glasow ~
If you install it like mentioned above "DO NOT" input the code. If you do
it will tell you that you cannot do an clean install with this code. Leave
the code out and click on without it then do an upgrade install from within
Windows.

Good luck!
 
C

Charles Tomaras

charlie said:
I usually go to newegg.com, and buy a full win 7 pro version, either OEM
or retail. You may be able to buy a "bundle" that can save a bit on a
build your own.

If you really want to learn "C", MS has a "free" but somewhat limited
version of MS C++ or whatever the current version is. At various times the
free version has been feature or time limited.

My all-time favorite was "Power C", but those days are long gone.
Why not just grab a TechNet Plus subscription and download everything your
heart desires for your learning situation. Seems perfect for you.

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/subscriptions/default.aspx

$199 with two keys of quite a bit of stuff.
 
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C

charlie

Why not just grab a TechNet Plus subscription and download everything your
heart desires for your learning situation. Seems perfect for you.

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/subscriptions/default.aspx

$199 with two keys of quite a bit of stuff.
"Why not just grab a TechNet Plus subscription"

Actually, I do have a partner subscription that includes technet.
However, there are serious strings attached to these programs and keys.
Even so, the downloadable full versions (iso files) are quite useful.

A full retail copy, be it DVD or downloaded (iso) gives the user/owner
support and "rights" that are not available for an OEM version.
 

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