SSD for 50 bucks Put Windows on dual SSD RAID


M

Metspitzer

http://www.2dayblog.com/2012/08/02/crucial-outs-v4-ssd-for-solid-state-storage-on-a-budget/

I can't count the times I have re installed Windows. Twice because of
a bad SSD drive.

Windows should have virgin code that can not be modified. Anything
extra that gets added should be kept in another place in the modified
form. The user should have the option of starting over.

It should be easy to add a second drive with RAID so you could lose a
disk and not lose settings.
 
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C

charlie

Make an image. It's a lot faster to restore an image onto new hardware
than it is to reinstall Windows from scratch.


It does. It's stored on your installation DVD. ;-)
And can get modified by service packs, other updates, hot fixes, and so
forth once it's on the P/C. Years ago, we played with the idea of
locking windows in a file similar to the hibernate file, and also
similar to the "Restore" file used by Laptop OEMs. There were all sorts
of little "gotchas" that finally killed the project. The original reason
for the project was "security", and the control everything mentality of
the old IT people.
 
P

Paul

Metspitzer said:
http://www.2dayblog.com/2012/08/02/crucial-outs-v4-ssd-for-solid-state-storage-on-a-budget/

I can't count the times I have re installed Windows. Twice because of
a bad SSD drive.

Windows should have virgin code that can not be modified. Anything
extra that gets added should be kept in another place in the modified
form. The user should have the option of starting over.

It should be easy to add a second drive with RAID so you could lose a
disk and not lose settings.
It's an SSD.

You should be doing backups.

And Windows 7 has the System Image function, which makes restoring
the PC a snap. A combination of your recovery CD (in the same menu
as the making of the System Image), plus your USB hard drive with
the image of the system, is how you can restore the SSD equipped
laptop after a failure.

SSDs are more likely to fail from something like an internal firmware
related issue, than from the flash chips necessarily being bad.
So when your SSD just "winks out" and stops responding, it's
not necessarily an ordinary failure. It could be firmware
related, and the little processor in there isn't working
properly any more. Even hard drives have had this problem
on occasion (data table used to control the disk overflows,
and the processor on the hard drive controller card, can no
longer function correctly).

Paul
 
J

J. P. Gilliver (John)

In message <[email protected]>, Paul <[email protected]>
writes:
[]
It's an SSD.

You should be doing backups.
(Is the juxtaposition of those two statements just coincidental, or are
you saying SSDs are more prone to problems?)
And Windows 7 has the System Image function, which makes restoring
the PC a snap. A combination of your recovery CD (in the same menu
as the making of the System Image), plus your USB hard drive with
the image of the system, is how you can restore the SSD equipped
laptop after a failure.
It's a pity it needs the combination though. If 7 includes this image
function thing, surely they could have included the function to put
something bootable on the same device/medium as the backup, at least
where it is bootable via the BIOS? (And where it isn't it'd be a trivial
waste of space anyway: something that can boot and restore must be so
tiny as to be insignificant these days.)
 
P

Paul

J. P. Gilliver (John) said:
It's an SSD.

You should be doing backups.
(Is the juxtaposition of those two statements just coincidental, or are
you saying SSDs are more prone to problems?)
And Windows 7 has the System Image function, which makes restoring
the PC a snap. A combination of your recovery CD (in the same menu
as the making of the System Image), plus your USB hard drive with
the image of the system, is how you can restore the SSD equipped
laptop after a failure.
It's a pity it needs the combination though. If 7 includes this image
function thing, surely they could have included the function to put
something bootable on the same device/medium as the backup, at least
where it is bootable via the BIOS? (And where it isn't it'd be a trivial
waste of space anyway: something that can boot and restore must be so
tiny as to be insignificant these days.)
SSDs are more likely to fail from something like an internal firmware
related issue, than from the flash chips necessarily being bad.
So when your SSD just "winks out" and stops responding, it's
not necessarily an ordinary failure. It could be firmware
related, and the little processor in there isn't working
properly any more. Even hard drives have had this problem
on occasion (data table used to control the disk overflows,
and the processor on the hard drive controller card, can no
longer function correctly).

Paul
[/QUOTE]

I have to mention the recovery CD, because people (like me) who
get a laptop, it doesn't come with an installer DVD. You can use
the installer DVD to do a "bare metal" restore from a System Image.
If you don't have an installer DVD, you burn the recovery CD
(about 200MB of content), and that also allows booting the computer
when the hard drive needs to be changed out. The recovery CD
can't reinstall the OS, but can be used for various emergency
fixit type functions.

You can even download an installer DVD off the net, and use
that in your "time of peril", but that's not a fun way to do it.
(Need a working computer that can burn a DVD, need a broadband
connection, need the digitalriver URL etc.)

I try to make the distinction about SSD failures, so people
don't get all bent out of shape about "wear failure". Lots of
SSDs fail, but they fail "before their time". Because of the
spotty industry track record on firmware design, it pays to
keep doing the backups when you're using an SSD. Some of
the regulars around here, have already had several SSD failures,
which tells you that if you use the computer a lot, you're
going to learn about this stuff the hard way.

Failures like that, also happen with hard drives, and it's one
of the things I scan for, before deciding on what hard drive
to purchase. For example, I was evaluating 500GB, 1TB, and
2TB hard drive models a couple months ago. All ready to drive
off to the store and pick one up. Except the 1TB and 2TB
models available at the store, also happened to have
firmware issues (Seagate). I settled on the 500GB model,
which has less cache RAM, and also a different (older)
controller design. All good so far. You really can't
trust anyone these days, when it comes to product quality.

Paul
 
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J

J. P. Gilliver (John)

[QUOTE="Paul said:
It's an SSD.

You should be doing backups.
(Is the juxtaposition of those two statements just coincidental, or
are you saying SSDs are more prone to problems?)
And Windows 7 has the System Image function, which makes restoring
the PC a snap. A combination of your recovery CD (in the same menu
as the making of the System Image), plus your USB hard drive with
the image of the system, is how you can restore the SSD equipped
laptop after a failure.
It's a pity it needs the combination though. If 7 includes this
image function thing, surely they could have included the function to
put something bootable on the same device/medium as the backup, at
least where it is bootable via the BIOS? (And where it isn't it'd be
a trivial waste of space anyway: something that can boot and restore
must be so tiny as to be insignificant these days.)
SSDs are more likely to fail from something like an internal firmware
related issue, than from the flash chips necessarily being bad.
So when your SSD just "winks out" and stops responding, it's
not necessarily an ordinary failure. It could be firmware
related, and the little processor in there isn't working
properly any more. Even hard drives have had this problem
on occasion (data table used to control the disk overflows,
and the processor on the hard drive controller card, can no
longer function correctly).

Paul
[/QUOTE]

I have to mention the recovery CD, because people (like me) who
get a laptop, it doesn't come with an installer DVD. You can use
the installer DVD to do a "bare metal" restore from a System Image.[/QUOTE]

But - assuming "System Image" means writing something on external media,
be it CD (lots of), DVD (several), USB stick, or USB HD - I can't see
why the process of making one, assuming it is provided as part of
Windows 7 itself which it sounds as if it is, can't make something that
is itself bootable. It seems wrong to have to have both your System
Image and an installer DVD.
If you don't have an installer DVD, you burn the recovery CD
(about 200MB of content), and that also allows booting the computer
when the hard drive needs to be changed out. The recovery CD
Or changed in (-:?
can't reinstall the OS, but can be used for various emergency
fixit type functions.

You can even download an installer DVD off the net, and use
that in your "time of peril", but that's not a fun way to do it.
(Need a working computer that can burn a DVD, need a broadband
connection, need the digitalriver URL etc.)
(Indeed: a broadband connection that isn't metered, too!)
I try to make the distinction about SSD failures, so people
don't get all bent out of shape about "wear failure". Lots of
SSDs fail, but they fail "before their time". Because of the
spotty industry track record on firmware design, it pays to
keep doing the backups when you're using an SSD. Some of
the regulars around here, have already had several SSD failures,
which tells you that if you use the computer a lot, you're
going to learn about this stuff the hard way.
I'm still not, myself, tempted to go for them yet. Their failure mode
seems to be more likely to be sudden and total than HDs (and yes, I know
those can go that way too, but IME it's rarer). And however often you do
backups, you're going to lose _some_ work/play if something suddenly
sulks totally. (And that's without considering the built-in shutdown
mode.)
Failures like that, also happen with hard drives, and it's one
of the things I scan for, before deciding on what hard drive
to purchase. For example, I was evaluating 500GB, 1TB, and
2TB hard drive models a couple months ago. All ready to drive
off to the store and pick one up. Except the 1TB and 2TB
models available at the store, also happened to have
firmware issues (Seagate). I settled on the 500GB model,
which has less cache RAM, and also a different (older)
controller design. All good so far. You really can't
trust anyone these days, when it comes to product quality.

Paul
Still using my 160G drive - which still has 12.4/30.0 and 58.5/113 GB
free after some years! (Granted, XPSP3 not 7.)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G.5AL-IS-P--Ch++(p)[email protected]+Sh0!:`)DNAf

The main and the most glorious achievement of television is that it is killing
the art of conversation. If we think of the type of conversation television is
helping to kill, our gratitude must be undying. (George Mikes, "How to be
Inimitable" [1960].)
 

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