SSD Drives - Why so small in size?


D

Dave Willcox

Can somebody tell me why SSD drives are small in size when the
applications are getting bigger and bigger every day?

What is the point of having a machine with 128 GB SSD drive (or
256 GB) when one should go for at least 1000 GB using normal Hard
Drives? Am I missing something here? Do SSD have other means of
storing files and programs to make them viable for everyday use?
 
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P

(PeteCresswell)

Per Dave Willcox:
What is the point of having a machine with 128 GB SSD drive (or
256 GB) when one should go for at least 1000 GB using normal Hard
Drives? Am I missing something here? Do SSD have other means of
storing files and programs to make them viable for everyday use?
I can't speak for anybody else, but I use SSD drives only for my
"System" drive.

Data goes somewhere else - never, ever, under any circumstances
on the "System" drive. OK... sometimes I forget... but you get
the idea.

"C:" is for the system.

I'll usually have a "D:" for data to placate apps that have
trouble writing to a share... but 99.9% of my data lives on a NAS
box.

That being the case, even 128 gigs is wretched excess for a
system drive. I use 50 for my XP box and right now I have 30
free... and I have a *lot* of applications installed.

I can't imagine that it would be that much more space for a
Windows 7 system and apps.


The less I have on my system:

- The faster it is to make an image

- The faster it is to restore an image

- The less chance that I will lose data when
re-imaging. (Actually, I've moved from a
basic imaging utility to one whose file can
be opened up as if it were another disc drive
just for those cases where I forget and leave
data on the desktop or some other place on the
system drive...)
 
R

Rene Lamontagne

Can somebody tell me why SSD drives are small in size when the
applications are getting bigger and bigger every day?

What is the point of having a machine with 128 GB SSD drive (or
256 GB) when one should go for at least 1000 GB using normal Hard
Drives? Am I missing something here? Do SSD have other means of
storing files and programs to make them viable for everyday use?

SSD drives are meant as OS or application Drives, Not for storage 0f data.

Look up OCZ, Mercury and Lacie also others, you will find plenty of 1T
SSD drives! Can you afford them?

Regards, Rene
 
E

Ed Cryer

Dave said:
Can somebody tell me why SSD drives are small in size when the
applications are getting bigger and bigger every day?

What is the point of having a machine with 128 GB SSD drive (or
256 GB) when one should go for at least 1000 GB using normal Hard
Drives? Am I missing something here? Do SSD have other means of
storing files and programs to make them viable for everyday use?
SSD drives are currently more expensive to produce. But, and again but,
we live in a capitalist culture; supply and demand writ large against
the sky, and obscuring our greater needs. They'll follow the trodden
path of RAM memory, memory sticks, CPUs, hard drives etc. That is,
they'll get bigger and less expensive. And there'll come a time when
we'll all guffaw at the distant memory of a disk spinning on a spindle.

There goes Thomas Edison with his disk-recording! Ah ah ah! Distant, dim
and quaint. A time when there lived dwarves on this planet. Good-hearted
souls but dim.


Ed
 
K

Ken Blake

Can somebody tell me why SSD drives are small in size when the
applications are getting bigger and bigger every day?

What is the point of having a machine with 128 GB SSD drive (or
256 GB) when one should go for at least 1000 GB using normal Hard
Drives? Am I missing something here? Do SSD have other means of
storing files and programs to make them viable for everyday use?

Two points:

1. Most SSDs are relatively small because they get very expensive as
they get larger. If only few people can afford them, the manufacturer
doesn't want to try to sell larger ones and fail.

But that will change over the next few years. They will become cheaper
to manufacture, and in my view they will get larger and will
completely replace hard drives in the near future.

2. Most people who use SSDs use them only for the operating system and
for installed programs. Data files are kept on hard drives.

That too will change in the future, as their prices go down and they
get larger.
 
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S

s|b

I can't speak for anybody else, but I use SSD drives only for my
"System" drive.
Same goes for me. My Intel SSD is 120 GB, but 80 GB would have been
enough as well. (I'm only using 22,1 GiB atm.)

I also moved my Temp folders to another SATA hdd and disabled
Superfetch.
 
V

VanguardLH

Dave Willcox said:
Can somebody tell me why SSD drives are small in size when the
applications are getting bigger and bigger every day?
How much money do you want to spend on one? Well, you could always buy
many and spend thousands to chain them into a huge spanned drive or use
RAID to span across them. Then you can make them as big as your pocket
can afford.

Obviously a manufacturer cannot afford nor survive by producing goods
that no one buys. They have to find price points where consumers are
willing to purchase. I'm sure they could make far larger sizes of SSD
disks but how many consumers are going to buy them? As rarity (of
sales) and capacity increase so does price and at a non-linear rate.
Ten 128GB SSDs manufactured into one unit (if physically possible to get
all the flash memory inside one standard-sized disk enclosure) would not
cost

Then consider just who is going to buy those super-huge SSDs. It won't
be you or other buyers using consumer-grade computers but file service
companies or data centers (but they also realize economy in spanning).
Those type of customers are probably more interested in survivability of
data rather than cheapness of hardware so they won't be buying the type
of SSD that you do. They'll spend the bucks to get SLC instead of
buying the cheaper MLC types. They'll want enterprise-grade hardware,
not your consumer-grade stuff, and that costs more so they don't need to
waste money on single-unit huge capacity when RAIDING cheaper units
gives them better economy along with increase endurance.
What is the point of having a machine with 128 GB SSD drive (or
256 GB) when one should go for at least 1000 GB using normal Hard
Drives?
So do YOU really have that much disk space in the *OS* and *PROGRAMS* to
fill up a 128GB drive? Yeah, didn't think so.
Am I missing something here?
Yep, that you pollute your OS+app partition with tons of *data* files
that should be stored elsewhere.
Do SSD have other means of
storing files and programs to make them viable for everyday use?
That doesn't make sense. You were trying to say something but did so
poorly. Obviously SSDs store files. Some "other means" means not
storing on the SSD so the SSD is not relevant. Perhaps what you really
meant to ask is "Can [data] files and programs (which are files) be
stored other than on SSDs to make them usable". Of course. Install
programs (and their files) and especially your data files on a different
drive (which is not a partition on the SSD). I have a 160GB SATA disk
with one partition for the OS and apps and haven't run out of room on it
yet in over 6 years. There's still over 100GB left on it. The smaller
hard disk (1 partition = C: drive) is for the OS and apps. A larger
hard disk (1 partition = D: drive) is where I install games
(program+data) and store reference docs, videos, movies, audio,
downloaded files, and other such files go on my much larger drive on a
separate 500GB hard disk (with 1 partition). I changed the special
folder for "My Documents" to be on the D: drive (only because some
programs want to default to using that path to store their files rather
than let me specify elsewhere).

So why are you saving video, audio, movie, virtual machine, ISO images
and other huge files in the same partition as your OS drive? Who is
forcing you to store them all under your %userprofile% (which is on the
OS drive but can be moved to elsewhere)?

Partitioning on the same hard disk has purpose. Using partitions on
different disks also has purpose. It's up to you how you want to
purpose those partitions.
 
S

s|b

SSD drives are meant as OS or application Drives, Not for storage 0f data.
You can still use them as storage (/and/ OS). Even now, desktops and
laptops are sold with only one hdd and that's a SSD. For instance:
<http://tones.be/product/fin8-exstore-i3-3220-4gb-120gb-windows-8>

| Specificaties Harde Schijven
| SSD 120GB
| Harde schijf Optioneel

The customer can choose to install another hdd, but that's optional.

And who's to say when a SSD will stop working? According to SSDLife my
SSD's estimated (!) lifetime is over 8 years:
<http://img201.imageshack.us/img201/7958/ssdlife.png>

(I only use the SSD for W7 and other software though...)
 
M

Mike Barnes

(PeteCresswell) said:
Per Dave Willcox:

I can't speak for anybody else, but I use SSD drives only for my
"System" drive.

Data goes somewhere else - never, ever, under any circumstances
on the "System" drive. OK... sometimes I forget... but you get
the idea.

"C:" is for the system.

I'll usually have a "D:" for data to placate apps that have
trouble writing to a share... but 99.9% of my data lives on a NAS
box.

That being the case, even 128 gigs is wretched excess for a
system drive. I use 50 for my XP box and right now I have 30
free... and I have a *lot* of applications installed.

I can't imagine that it would be that much more space for a
Windows 7 system and apps.
Agreed with most of that. I have Win7 Pro and a *lot* of apps installed
and my C drive (system) takes up less than half of the 75GB SSD. I have
a D drive for my documents and I put that on the SSD as well because
that space would otherwise be wasted. I also have an N drive on the SSD
that holds the TEMP folder and a lot of other stuff that I have no
interest in backing up. There's still loads of empty space on the SSD.

The real disk-hogs are of course media files and I have 500GB or so on a
NAS drive.

I think most people could work quite happily with a NAS drive for media
and an SSD for everything else.
 
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R

ray carter

Can somebody tell me why SSD drives are small in size when the
applications are getting bigger and bigger every day?
$$$$$$$$$$$$


What is the point of having a machine with 128 GB SSD drive (or 256 GB)
when one should go for at least 1000 GB using normal Hard Drives? Am I
missing something here? Do SSD have other means of storing files and
programs to make them viable for everyday use?
 
J

Jason

What is the point of having a machine with 128 GB SSD drive (or
256 GB) when one should go for at least 1000 GB using normal Hard
Drives? Am I missing something here? Do SSD have other means of
storing files and programs to make them viable for everyday use?
I can't speak for anybody else, but I use SSD drives only for my
"System" drive.

Data goes somewhere else - never, ever, under any circumstances
on the "System" drive. OK... sometimes I forget... but you get
the idea.

"C:" is for the system.

I'll usually have a "D:" for data to placate apps that have
trouble writing to a share... but 99.9% of my data lives on a NAS
box.

That being the case, even 128 gigs is wretched excess for a
system drive. I use 50 for my XP box and right now I have 30
free... and I have a *lot* of applications installed.

I can't imagine that it would be that much more space for a
Windows 7 system and apps.


The less I have on my system:

- The faster it is to make an image

- The faster it is to restore an image

- The less chance that I will lose data when
re-imaging. (Actually, I've moved from a
basic imaging utility to one whose file can
be opened up as if it were another disc drive
just for those cases where I forget and leave
data on the desktop or some other place on the
system drive...)[/QUOTE]

What do you do about Win 7's tendency to put all the User
loca/roaming/remote folders in C: ? There are pretty safe, standard
ways to move *some* of that to another partition, but far from all (at
least that I've discovered.)

Jason
 
P

Paul

Dave said:
Can somebody tell me why SSD drives are small in size when the
applications are getting bigger and bigger every day?

What is the point of having a machine with 128 GB SSD drive (or
256 GB) when one should go for at least 1000 GB using normal Hard
Drives? Am I missing something here? Do SSD have other means of
storing files and programs to make them viable for everyday use?
Here is a 1TB SSD, for $2,549.99 USD.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820227797

Bill Gates probably owns one of those.

Paul
 
L

Lee Waun

s|b said:
Same goes for me. My Intel SSD is 120 GB, but 80 GB would have been
enough as well. (I'm only using 22,1 GiB atm.)

I also moved my Temp folders to another SATA hdd and disabled
Superfetch.
I am using a 128 GB SSD on this laptop for windows 7 and all my data and I
still have 80 GB's of free space. Keep all my data backed up on a separate
usb drive. Would never go back to a hard drive as they are just to damn
slow.
 
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P

philo 

Maybe, maybe not. I'm reminded of the story where Gates and Warren Buffet
shared a 'buy one, get one free' coupon at McDonald's about 15 years ago.
The moral at the time was, you don't get to be rich by wasting your money.


Whether true or not, the point behind the story is a good one.



As to SSD , I have been reluctant to use one as my fear would be failure
with no warning. With a mechanical drive it's been my experience that
there is usually some type of warning first...such as SMART, bad
clusters or R/W errors.



Of course in all cases a good backup strategy is required.
 
E

Ed Cryer

Paul said:
Here is a 1TB SSD, for $2,549.99 USD.
the relevant
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820227797

Bill Gates probably owns one of those.

Paul
That's it; that's the one that spells the end of HDs. It'll probably
take a few years but I think it looks inevitable now.

And, of course, the price will drop rapidly as manufacturers tool up for
mass production, with all the relevant sales and delivery mechanisms
becoming better and cheaper.

Ed
 
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A

Art Todesco

Same goes for me. My Intel SSD is 120 GB, but 80 GB would have been
enough as well. (I'm only using 22,1 GiB atm.)

I also moved my Temp folders to another SATA hdd and disabled
Superfetch.
I am planning on a W7 computer to be used to produce sounds for an organ.
The computer will probably run 24/7 as you don't want to have to wait for a
W7 boot, once the power switch is turned on, 10 or 15 seconds would be ok.
So, with an SSD, there would be no moving parts to wear out. Now, to find
some really quiet fans. Actually, there are some out there as I did buy one
for my last PC.
 

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