Removing Internet Explorer


Joined
Jun 29, 2012
Messages
79
Reaction score
1
I think I've used IE 11 maybe twice in the last year yet I constantly read articles on how vulnerable it is to Malware attacks. My question or issue is should I get rid of it by un-installing it or should I just leave it alone and update it through normal Windows Updates. I use win 7 and most of the time I use the Chrome browser with PaleMoon x64 as a backup browser. I tried to google this issue to see what most people thought but really couldn't get any kind of reply due probably to the way I worded the search.
 
Ad

Advertisements

TrainableMan

^ The World's First ^
Moderator
Joined
May 10, 2010
Messages
9,325
Reaction score
1,584
Uninstalling the IE11 update would just put you back to IE10 which would not be any more secure. If you don't want IE at all, simply go to Control Panel > Programs and Features, Turn Windows Features On or Off. Remove the check next to IE 11. But it won't make you any more secure, it's only a risk if you use it.

All browsers are at risk from malware though. And most people do far more damage to themselves than have ever been bypassed by some webpage trickery. "Here try this program to speed up your PC" or "here install this game" and people are more than willing to download and install a program and happily authorize it to make changes to their computer. My point, if you want to be safe then research a product before you install it, download things from trust-worthy sites, and read every installation option and uncheck boxes to make sure you aren't changing your homepage, installing a toolbar, agreeing to ads, or starting a free trial.
 
Joined
Jun 29, 2012
Messages
79
Reaction score
1
Uninstalling the IE11 update would just put you back to IE10 which would not be any more secure. If you don't want IE at all, simply go to Control Panel > Programs and Features, Turn Windows Features On or Off. Remove the check next to IE 11. But it won't make you any more secure, it's only a risk if you use it.

All browsers are at risk from malware though. And most people do far more damage to themselves than have ever been bypassed by some webpage trickery. "Here try this program to speed up your PC" or "here install this game" and people are more than willing to download and install a program and happily authorize it to make changes to their computer. My point, if you want to be safe then research a product before you install it, download things from trust-worthy sites, and read every installation option and uncheck boxes to make sure you aren't changing your homepage, installing a toolbar, agreeing to ads, or starting a free trial.
I understand that Train. My only gripe with IE is I've had browser hijacks without even touching that browser. I've also had toolbars added to it and I know that was my fault because of some unsafe program I neglected to watch while I installed it and got one of those "Babylon" add ons that you get for not unchecking while installing. I guess what I'm getting at is it's something I don't use so why have it? I got rid of Firefox because I don't use it anymore so I thought maybe it's time to do the same with IE just as long as there are no repercussions for doing so.
 

TrainableMan

^ The World's First ^
Moderator
Joined
May 10, 2010
Messages
9,325
Reaction score
1,584
It never really uninstalls it. And if you turn it off you get a warning that "Turning off IE11 might affect other Windows features and programs installed on your computer, including default settings".

Microsoft said:
Windows 7 ... include(s) functionality that allows users to turn off Internet Explorer. If Internet Explorer is turned off, it's not available for use by any users on the computer and can't be launched for any reason, even if no other browser is available on the system. The program files to launch and use Internet Explorer are removed to a separate storage location as a backup copy so that a user can turn Internet Explorer back on if the user wishes to do so later.

When Internet Explorer is turned off using this feature there is minimal impact on third-party programs (and other parts of Windows itself) that call upon Internet Explorer app services, because the Internet Explorer files that provide functionality to third parties and other parts of Windows are left intact.[/S]
 
Ad

Advertisements

Shintaro

Moderator
Joined
Mar 1, 2012
Messages
2,137
Reaction score
252
Just as a side note in regards to your computers security.

Does your account on you computer have administrative rights? For example is your account Type a Standard User or an Administrator?

Most people (General users) get in to trouble because they have too much rights and don't realize what some of the criminals are trying to make them do.

You only need admin right to install software and for system maintenance. So for 90% of the things that people do on a day-to-day basis, they don't need admin rights.

I removed admin rights from all my relatives computers, because before I did I was getting too many calls.
 

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top