Reactivating W7 Ultimate


A

Allen Drake

I am wondering if this is the same and as easy as WinXP. I am going
to upgrade my CPU and wanted to know what to expect before I start if
everything is basically the same. I have several installations all
full versions that have been upgraded to Ultimate and probably will be
adding other hardware like Mother Boards to some.

Thanks for any tips.

Al.
 
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A

Allen Drake

Updating your CPU won't affect activation. The MB, OTOH, may not only
require reactivating but may also require reinstalling Windows. In any
and all events, the worst that could happen is that you need to make a
five minute phone call.
A phone call is worse then reinstalling Windows? Do I have to speak
to Peggy?

:)
 
J

J. P. Gilliver (John)

Alias said:
Updating your CPU won't affect activation. The MB, OTOH, may not only
require reactivating but may also require reinstalling Windows. In any
and all events, the worst that could happen is that you need to make a
five minute phone call.
Doesn't that depend on what he means by a "full version"? If he means
full retail (costs a ridiculous price, at least here in UK), fine, but
if he just means it's Ultimate (or whatever the "top" version is
called), don't OEM ones come tied - in effect - to a motherboard?

Or is Ultimate (or whatever) not available as an OEM-only version?

(Or are MS being lenient at the moment whatever the situation, as I've
heard they are being with XP activation?)
 
A

Allen Drake

Doesn't that depend on what he means by a "full version"? If he means
full retail (costs a ridiculous price, at least here in UK), fine, but
if he just means it's Ultimate (or whatever the "top" version is
called), don't OEM ones come tied - in effect - to a motherboard?

Or is Ultimate (or whatever) not available as an OEM-only version?

(Or are MS being lenient at the moment whatever the situation, as I've
heard they are being with XP activation?)
If I am not mistaken OEM is the version that is installed when you
purchase a computer. I have been building my own and purchasing the
full version for every system for at least a decade. It might not be
the cheapest way out but who cares about money?
 
J

J. P. Gilliver (John)

In message <[email protected]>, Allen Drake
If I am not mistaken OEM is the version that is installed when you
purchase a computer. I have been building my own and purchasing the
full version for every system for at least a decade. It might not be
the cheapest way out but who cares about money?
Not quite (unless it has changed with 7, and I haven't heard that that
is the case): you can buy OEM versions - quite legally - without buying
a computer. They're a lot cheaper. One main difference is that there's
virtually no support available, either from the vendors or Microsoft:
you're very much on your own; I think the other main difference, though
I'm hazy about the details, is that it's a lot more restricted what it
can be installed on. A full retail version can in theory be transferred
between machines, as long as you uninstall it from one when you install
it on another; I think an OEM one is designed really only to be
installed on one machine.

Because people do upgrade (more RAM, bigger HD, other enhancements) and
replace faulty parts, it allows the system it finds itself on to change,
gradually - at least, that's the case for XP; I _assume_ 7 has something
similar. There are "points" attached to various aspects - the amount of
RAM changing is so many points, the HD serial number changing is so
many, and so on; if the points clock up above a certain level within a
certain time, it decides that it might have been moved to a different
system, and tells you to reactivate. I think a mobo change carries the
most points, for obvious reasons. Sometimes the reactivation can be
automatic, sometimes you have to convince someone at MS that you
_haven't_ moved it beyond what the EULA - which is more restrictive for
OEM versions - allows. I'm pretty sure even a full retail version does
something similar, though presumably the thresholds are higher, and the
people at MS more tolerant.
 
A

Allen Drake

In message <[email protected]>, Allen Drake


Not quite (unless it has changed with 7, and I haven't heard that that
is the case): you can buy OEM versions - quite legally - without buying
a computer. They're a lot cheaper. One main difference is that there's
virtually no support available, either from the vendors or Microsoft:
you're very much on your own; I think the other main difference, though
I'm hazy about the details, is that it's a lot more restricted what it
can be installed on. A full retail version can in theory be transferred
between machines, as long as you uninstall it from one when you install
it on another; I think an OEM one is designed really only to be
installed on one machine.

Because people do upgrade (more RAM, bigger HD, other enhancements) and
replace faulty parts, it allows the system it finds itself on to change,
gradually - at least, that's the case for XP; I _assume_ 7 has something
similar. There are "points" attached to various aspects - the amount of
RAM changing is so many points, the HD serial number changing is so
many, and so on; if the points clock up above a certain level within a
certain time, it decides that it might have been moved to a different
system, and tells you to reactivate. I think a mobo change carries the
most points, for obvious reasons. Sometimes the reactivation can be
automatic, sometimes you have to convince someone at MS that you
_haven't_ moved it beyond what the EULA - which is more restrictive for
OEM versions - allows. I'm pretty sure even a full retail version does
something similar, though presumably the thresholds are higher, and the
people at MS more tolerant.

Thanks for that. I will copy this to a text file for future
reference. The CPU change went well as I am again up and running. It
didn't take all that long and I didn't even have to remove the MB. I
do hate these large fingers though. It took several times to get that
chip seated right. I wish there was some sort of tool that could be
used to hold it and release it when it was perfectly aligned. Now I
will be removing all the hardware and installing everything in a new
case. All this is totally unnecessary and only done out of boredom of
coarse.

Al.
 
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R

R. C. White

Hi, Allen.
If I am not mistaken OEM is the version that is installed when you
purchase a computer.
OEM means "Original Equipment Manufacturer". This can mean one of the Big
Boys like HP or Dell, or a "System Builder" like your friendly local Mom &
Pop computer shop. The Big Boys buy in quantity at steep discounts from
Microsoft and revise Windows - sometimes extensively - for compatibility
with their own hardware, plus any other hardware or software they might
include in the "bundle" as they deliver it for retail sale. Mom & Pop will
buy the System Builder version in smaller quantities at wholesale prices;
they might customize the operating system, but they usually don't.

In either case, the lower price comes at a cost: the OEM assumes all
obligation to support the Windows they sell. So, if your Dell printer
doesn't work with your Dell-branded Windows, call Dell, not Microsoft. If
the computer you got from M&P with OEM Win7 pre-installed doesn't work with
the printer you got from M&P - or elsewhere - complain to M&P, not
Microsoft.
I have been building my own and purchasing the full version for every
system for at least a decade. It might not be the cheapest way out but who
cares about money?
The System Builder version of OEM Windows is SUPPOSED to be sold only with a
computer, or with a significant part such as a CPU or hard disk drive. Over
the years, that got stretched to the point that M&P might sell a copy with
just a disk cable; my understanding is that the "with hardware" requirement
is no longer enforced. But the OEM is still obligated to support that copy
of Windows - and the OEM is YOU, the buyer/installer. Again, don't call
Microsoft for support.

That OEM copy of Windows, whether the branded version or the System Builder
version, is forever licensed to THAT computer and cannot be installed and
activated on any other. If that computer is stolen, sold or junked, the
license is gone, too.

A retail copy of Windows - any consumer version, whether upgrade package or
"full" version - comes with Microsoft support, of course. That copy of
Windows can be re-installed on the same computer an unlimited number of
times. And it can be installed on an unlimited number of computers - so
long as it is removed from every other computer first.

But don't rely on some guy in a newsgroup - like me - when it is so easy to
get the official word:
http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows7/products/home

RC
--
R. C. White, CPA
San Marcos, TX
(e-mail address removed)
Microsoft Windows MVP (2002-2010)
Windows Live Mail 2011 (Build 15.4.3538.0513) in Win7 Ultimate x64 SP1


"Allen Drake" wrote in message

Doesn't that depend on what he means by a "full version"? If he means
full retail (costs a ridiculous price, at least here in UK), fine, but
if he just means it's Ultimate (or whatever the "top" version is
called), don't OEM ones come tied - in effect - to a motherboard?

Or is Ultimate (or whatever) not available as an OEM-only version?

(Or are MS being lenient at the moment whatever the situation, as I've
heard they are being with XP activation?)
If I am not mistaken OEM is the version that is installed when you
purchase a computer. I have been building my own and purchasing the
full version for every system for at least a decade. It might not be
the cheapest way out but who cares about money?
 
F

FD

That OEM copy of Windows, whether the branded version or the System
Builder version, is forever licensed to THAT computer and cannot be
installed and activated on any other. If that computer is stolen, sold
or junked, the license is gone, too.
My experience has been different.

I did post something to that effect.

I recently bought 2 computers..

1) A small form factor Acer which came with win 7 professional 64 bit to use
in a lab. My lab equipment requires windows XP.

2) Mom and Pop computer with modern processor (intel g620) and no
operarting system.
This was to replace and old XP computer .

I installed windows 7 with a 32 OEM dvd on the mom and pop computer and used
the keys from Acer. I had to call Microsoft and got it activated with
the computer
voice.

I used an xp keys from a 7 year old discarded Compaq computer and
installed an OEM version of XP professional on the Acer It got
activated automatically.

FD
 
J

J. P. Gilliver (John)

Allen Drake said:
On Sat, 24 Dec 2011 15:42:44 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Not quite (unless it has changed with 7, and I haven't heard that that []
most points, for obvious reasons. Sometimes the reactivation can be
automatic, sometimes you have to convince someone at MS that you
_haven't_ moved it beyond what the EULA - which is more restrictive for
OEM versions - allows. I'm pretty sure even a full retail version does
something similar, though presumably the thresholds are higher, and the
people at MS more tolerant.

Thanks for that. I will copy this to a text file for future
I had a quick Google, and this http://www.aumha.org/win5/a/wpa.php looks
like it might be relevant - though it's written for XP. For XP,
according to the above page:

You get 30 days after installation to activate.
If you've got at least SP1, you get 30 days for something, or 120 for
others ... oh, read the page (-: [or preferably a Windows 7 equivalent
one].
[]
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G.5AL-IS-P--Ch++(p)[email protected]+Sh0!:`)DNAf

I'm sometimes a bit bewildered by that, really - there are no young people in
it, there's no sex, there's no violence, no car chases and there's no action
and no vampires. - Colin Firth on the success of the film "The King's Speech".
Radio Times 10-16 September 2011
 
R

Roy Smith

I am wondering if this is the same and as easy as WinXP. I am going
to upgrade my CPU and wanted to know what to expect before I start if
everything is basically the same. I have several installations all
full versions that have been upgraded to Ultimate and probably will be
adding other hardware like Mother Boards to some.
Just as with XP you can upgrade a few components without having to
reactivate a Windows 7 PC. Now just how much of a change that triggers
a reactivation your guess is as good as mine.


--

Roy Smith
Windows 7 Home Premium 64-Bit
Thunderbird 8.0
Saturday, December 24, 2011 6:33:50 PM
 
Y

Yousuf Khan

I am wondering if this is the same and as easy as WinXP. I am going
to upgrade my CPU and wanted to know what to expect before I start if
everything is basically the same. I have several installations all
full versions that have been upgraded to Ultimate and probably will be
adding other hardware like Mother Boards to some.

Thanks for any tips.

Al.
I just recently upgraded my CPU, but kept the same motherboard. It
didn't require any reactivation.

Yousuf Khan
 
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A

Allen Drake

Allen Drake said:
On Sat, 24 Dec 2011 15:42:44 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Not quite (unless it has changed with 7, and I haven't heard that that []
most points, for obvious reasons. Sometimes the reactivation can be
automatic, sometimes you have to convince someone at MS that you
_haven't_ moved it beyond what the EULA - which is more restrictive for
OEM versions - allows. I'm pretty sure even a full retail version does
something similar, though presumably the thresholds are higher, and the
people at MS more tolerant.

Thanks for that. I will copy this to a text file for future
I had a quick Google, and this http://www.aumha.org/win5/a/wpa.php looks
like it might be relevant - though it's written for XP. For XP,
according to the above page:

You get 30 days after installation to activate.
If you've got at least SP1, you get 30 days for something, or 120 for
others ... oh, read the page (-: [or preferably a Windows 7 equivalent
one].
[]
Nice article and thanks again. I could never put up with using the OS
while it is not activated. Just to many nags for my comfort.

Al.
 
A

Allen Drake

Hi, Allen.


OEM means "Original Equipment Manufacturer". This can mean one of the Big
Boys like HP or Dell, or a "System Builder" like your friendly local Mom &
Pop computer shop. The Big Boys buy in quantity at steep discounts from
Microsoft and revise Windows - sometimes extensively - for compatibility
with their own hardware, plus any other hardware or software they might
include in the "bundle" as they deliver it for retail sale. Mom & Pop will
buy the System Builder version in smaller quantities at wholesale prices;
they might customize the operating system, but they usually don't.

In either case, the lower price comes at a cost: the OEM assumes all
obligation to support the Windows they sell. So, if your Dell printer
doesn't work with your Dell-branded Windows, call Dell, not Microsoft. If
the computer you got from M&P with OEM Win7 pre-installed doesn't work with
the printer you got from M&P - or elsewhere - complain to M&P, not
Microsoft.


The System Builder version of OEM Windows is SUPPOSED to be sold only with a
computer, or with a significant part such as a CPU or hard disk drive. Over
the years, that got stretched to the point that M&P might sell a copy with
just a disk cable; my understanding is that the "with hardware" requirement
is no longer enforced. But the OEM is still obligated to support that copy
of Windows - and the OEM is YOU, the buyer/installer. Again, don't call
Microsoft for support.

That OEM copy of Windows, whether the branded version or the System Builder
version, is forever licensed to THAT computer and cannot be installed and
activated on any other. If that computer is stolen, sold or junked, the
license is gone, too.

A retail copy of Windows - any consumer version, whether upgrade package or
"full" version - comes with Microsoft support, of course. That copy of
Windows can be re-installed on the same computer an unlimited number of
times. And it can be installed on an unlimited number of computers - so
long as it is removed from every other computer first.

But don't rely on some guy in a newsgroup - like me - when it is so easy to
get the official word:
http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows7/products/home

RC
Great post RC. Thank you very much.

Al.
 
A

Allen Drake

My experience has been different.

I did post something to that effect.

I recently bought 2 computers..

1) A small form factor Acer which came with win 7 professional 64 bit to use
in a lab. My lab equipment requires windows XP.

2) Mom and Pop computer with modern processor (intel g620) and no
operarting system.
This was to replace and old XP computer .

I installed windows 7 with a 32 OEM dvd on the mom and pop computer and used
the keys from Acer. I had to call Microsoft and got it activated with
the computer
voice.

I used an xp keys from a 7 year old discarded Compaq computer and
installed an OEM version of XP professional on the Acer It got
activated automatically.

FD

I remember reading your posts about your experience. Nice to know
this can be done.

Al.
 
A

Allen Drake

Just as with XP you can upgrade a few components without having to
reactivate a Windows 7 PC. Now just how much of a change that triggers
a reactivation your guess is as good as mine.
I guess I will find out sooner or later what the limits are as I am
always fiddling with one system or another. I did notice that one
system got an increase of 4.1 to 6.6 by adding a newer CPU. That was
not my best as I do have a new laptop that gets somewhere in the 7
range along with a new desktop build that does equally as well. I
don't mess with those but I do like to play with the others
continually.

Al
 
A

Allen Drake

I just recently upgraded my CPU, but kept the same motherboard. It
didn't require any reactivation.

Yousuf Khan
That's what I just noticed and from reading these posts it seems that
will always be a safe upgrade.

Al.
 
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J

J. P. Gilliver (John)

Allen Drake said:
On Sat, 24 Dec 2011 22:32:46 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
I had a quick Google, and this http://www.aumha.org/win5/a/wpa.php looks
like it might be relevant - though it's written for XP. For XP,
according to the above page:

You get 30 days after installation to activate.
If you've got at least SP1, you get 30 days for something, or 120 for
others ... oh, read the page (-: [or preferably a Windows 7 equivalent
one].
[]
Nice article and thanks again. I could never put up with using the OS
while it is not activated. Just to many nags for my comfort.

Al.
Yes, I thought it was a good article, and explained what is going on,
and how the system decides whether you've given it a body transplant or
not!

However, I would suggest finding a similar one for 7, as it's probably
different in subtle ways. From what I remember, there's a detailed
section on activation in the tweaking guide
(http://www.tweakguides.com/TGTC.html - it has versions for XP, Vista
and 7). They're big books though!
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G.5AL-IS-P--Ch++(p)[email protected]+Sh0!:`)DNAf

I'm sometimes a bit bewildered by that, really - there are no young people in
it, there's no sex, there's no violence, no car chases and there's no action
and no vampires. - Colin Firth on the success of the film "The King's Speech".
Radio Times 10-16 September 2011
 
A

Allen Drake

Allen Drake said:
On Sat, 24 Dec 2011 22:32:46 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
I had a quick Google, and this http://www.aumha.org/win5/a/wpa.php looks
like it might be relevant - though it's written for XP. For XP,
according to the above page:

You get 30 days after installation to activate.
If you've got at least SP1, you get 30 days for something, or 120 for
others ... oh, read the page (-: [or preferably a Windows 7 equivalent
one].
[]
Nice article and thanks again. I could never put up with using the OS
while it is not activated. Just to many nags for my comfort.

Al.
Yes, I thought it was a good article, and explained what is going on,
and how the system decides whether you've given it a body transplant or
not!

However, I would suggest finding a similar one for 7, as it's probably
different in subtle ways. From what I remember, there's a detailed
section on activation in the tweaking guide
(http://www.tweakguides.com/TGTC.html - it has versions for XP, Vista
and 7). They're big books though!
Yes, I will be looking for more on that subject before I do anything
beyond replacing the CPU. I'm sure there is plenty out there. Thanks
again for another great reference link.

Al.
 
J

jim

I upgrade my mobo, mem, and video card. In otherwords a newly home made
system. Although Win-7 (Prof. 64-Bit) went in with no difficulties, it would
not activate via normal channel. I had to call and verify Win-7 was
installed on one machine only. Activation presented no problem.

I have several pieces of software in which in publisher implores people to
use their deactivation procedure (such as Adobe's PS Elements) if your going
to uninstall their program and/or reinstall it on another system. Why
doesn't MS do something similar? As long as your copy of Windows is
installed on the one system you own, the program shouldn't balk (as long as
you're able to "deactivate" it.

"Allen Drake" wrote in message


I am wondering if this is the same and as easy as WinXP. I am going
to upgrade my CPU and wanted to know what to expect before I start if
everything is basically the same. I have several installations all
full versions that have been upgraded to Ultimate and probably will be
adding other hardware like Mother Boards to some.

Thanks for any tips.

Al.
 
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A

Allen Drake

I upgrade my mobo, mem, and video card. In otherwords a newly home made
system. Although Win-7 (Prof. 64-Bit) went in with no difficulties, it would
not activate via normal channel. I had to call and verify Win-7 was
installed on one machine only. Activation presented no problem.

I have several pieces of software in which in publisher implores people to
use their deactivation procedure (such as Adobe's PS Elements) if your going
to uninstall their program and/or reinstall it on another system. Why
doesn't MS do something similar? As long as your copy of Windows is
installed on the one system you own, the program shouldn't balk (as long as
you're able to "deactivate" it.
That is what I did several times with one of my XP boxes. I kept
changing different hardware like boards and CPUs just to see how they
worked and each time I had to call and verify I was using one system.
It doesn't seem to matter how many time a day you do this it never
fails. I guess it's the same with Win7. That was what I was wondering.
I even had to reactivate when I moved everything to another case.
Somehow all the same hardware still detected something different.

Al.
 
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