pagefile.sys too big?


Joined
Apr 10, 2011
Messages
51
Reaction score
1
Could some kind soul explain what pagefile.sys function is? My pagefile.sys is a whopping 12GB, my RAM is 12GB. Some progies and games falter and/or crash on me (ESP Battlefield 3). I have a separate PCI-E x16 2GB graphics card (powered), the "C" drive is SSD. So, I cant compute any calculations or formulas being ignorant of pagefile.sys function. Does it have to be so big? I admit I have many programs and background progies too. TIA!
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Jan 2, 2011
Messages
144
Reaction score
39
Page File

Forest.lawn~

You page file is .. in simple terms .. where things are saved while being run to alleviate the stress on you hard drive OR memory .. OR your CPU..

This site explains it a bit better. It is geared to mostly older versions of Windows .. but I believe it still stands as some good advice..

I personally have set my page file at a minimum and maximum.. and have not had a problem..

Hope that helps.
~LoneWolf
 

TrainableMan

^ The World's First ^
Moderator
Joined
May 10, 2010
Messages
9,342
Reaction score
1,584
Your pagefile.sys is not on your SSD is it?

It is a system file. Unless you have an extremely small hard drive I would not bother changing the pagefile size from system defaults.
 

TrainableMan

^ The World's First ^
Moderator
Joined
May 10, 2010
Messages
9,342
Reaction score
1,584
Well it is a good idea to have it on the SSD, because it will be real fast if it is used, and I believe it is recommended that it match the size of your RAM which is probably why it is 12GB, but I personally think I would make it smaller, maybe 3 or 4GB to save SSD space.

If you go to control panel > system then click advanced system settings. A System Properties window will open. Choose the Advanced Tab then under Performance click Settings. The Performance Options window will open; choose the Advanced tab there. Under Virtual Memory click Change. You will need to remove the check beside "manage automatically" and then you can set it as desired.
 

Digerati

Post Quinquagenarian
VIP Member
Joined
Apr 7, 2010
Messages
1,094
Reaction score
277
I see no reason not to just let Windows manage your size and forget about it - Windows is very capable of doing it just fine.

In the olden days with XP, I used to set my min and max sizes to the same value to have a "fixed" size PF. But with W7 and now with W8, plus 20 plus years of data and experience (and the cheap costs of disk space - including SSD space) the developers have it figured out. There is no evidence or study to suggest setting a fixed size, or user managed size is better. The exception is if critically low on disk space - but that is no solution to the problem - which is not enough disk space. And in that event, you need to uninstall or move files off that drive, or buy more disk space.

TrainableMan said:
Well it is a good idea to have it on the SSD, because it will be real fast if it is used, and I believe it is recommended that it match the size of your RAM which is probably why it is 12GB, but I personally think I would make it smaller, maybe 3 or 4GB to save SSD space.
I agree with the first part of this statement. In fact, SSDs are ideally suited for Page Files (see SSD FAQs, Should the pagefile be placed on SSDs?).

However, I don't agree to make the PF smaller to save space. If an extra 8 or 9Gb of disk space is needed that badly, making the PF smaller is not the solution. You need to uninstall programs or files to free up space, or buy a bigger or additional drive.
 
Ad

Advertisements

TrainableMan

^ The World's First ^
Moderator
Joined
May 10, 2010
Messages
9,342
Reaction score
1,584
Well if I had a 60GB SSD and 12GB of RAM I wouldn't be using 20% of my SSD "in case" the 12GB of RAM wasn't enough and my computer needed to page. I don't believe the defaults Microsoft sets are always best for everyone; they pick a middle ground that is good for many

forest.lawn, it is your computer; I suggest you do what you think is best for your needs.
 
Ad

Advertisements

Digerati

Post Quinquagenarian
VIP Member
Joined
Apr 7, 2010
Messages
1,094
Reaction score
277
I don't believe the defaults Microsoft sets are always best for everyone; they pick a middle ground that is good for many
I agree 100% with this. I am just saying if you don't have a thorough grasp of how virtual memory works, how it is managed, and how it is specifically being utilized in your computer (which is based in large part by how you use your computer) then leave it alone and let Windows manage it. Guessing and old formulas is not the way. It takes careful observation, adjustments, observation and more adjustments to do it right. If the peak usage level is well below current PF size, then and only then would I consider setting a smaller size.

Well if I had a 60GB SSD and 12GB of RAM I wouldn't be using 20% of my SSD "in case" the 12GB of RAM wasn't enough and my computer needed to page.
Well, "what ifs", extreme examples, and exceptions don't make the rule. The vast majority of users (including our OP, forest.lawn) have more disk space than 60Gb and most users don't run with 12Gb of RAM.

"If" me, I would use that 60Gb SSD in one of three ways. (1) As the boot drive with only my OS, a Windows managed page file, with apps and temp files on a second drive. (2) I would use another drive as my boot drive, then create my primary page file on the 60Gb SSD, which I would have installed as a secondary (or tertiary drive) - keeping a small PF on my boot drive. Or (3), I would retire the tiny 60Gb SSD and add it to my pile of perfectly good but too small drives I have in my basement, along with old monitors, PSUs and other obsolete (but still working) electronics.

That said, I emphasis again that a Windows Managed page file expands and contracts as needed. So just because a Windows Managed page file is capable of being large, that does not mean it will be large, or that it will stay large.
 

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top