Ownership of files and folders


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I have been running Win7 32 bit for several months and dual boot it. I decided to install the 64 bit version on one of my drives to see how it worked and how it would affect the programs I use.

I keep all data files and directories on drives which are separate from OS drives. I have done this for years and it has proved to be a safe way to handle them.

When I installed the 64 bit version, things went well and programs like Photoshop already have 64 bit installs so those programs seem just fine. HOWEVER ... today I went into a data drive to access some video files I am working on ... and got a popup saying that I didn't have permission to access them. When I clicked on the provided link to get permission...I got another popup denying access for that.

So here's the deal. I built the computer. I installed the OS. I installed all the programs. I created all the data. I am the ONLY user on this computer. So how is it that Windows can tell me that I can't access my own files?

I fiddled with the security functions a bit ... following an illustrated tutorial I found in these forums ... and now I have a couple of folders with padlock symbols on them and I haven't figured out how to remove the padlocks.

Is there some master security setting which will cover the entire computer which will let me access my own stuff WITHOUT HAVING TO DO EACH FILE OR FOLDER ONE AT A TIME

??????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????
 

Elmer BeFuddled

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Welcome OldBaldGuy.

I recently had a similar issue after a(nother) fresh install.

I was unable to edit any file contained in the "My Pics" folder. Strangely all the other "My" folders kept on the same separate HDD were A.O.K.

The permissions you had previously were for a different Administrator account or something like that (you know, the s-1-5-21 etc. etc. number that changes (???) in HOT_KEY_USERS).

I made/added a context menu entry using a .reg file

Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\*\shell\runas]
@="Take Ownership"
"HasLUAShield"=""
"NoWorkingDirectory"=""

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\*\shell\runas\command]
@="cmd.exe /c takeown /f \"%1\" && icacls \"%1\" /grant administrators:F"
"IsolatedCommand"="cmd.exe /c takeown /f \"%1\" && icacls \"%1\" /grant administrators:F"

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\exefile\shell\runas]
@="Take Ownership"
"HasLUAShield"=""
"NoWorkingDirectory"=""

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\exefile\shell\runas\command]
@="cmd.exe /c takeown /f \"%1\" && icacls \"%1\" /grant administrators:F"
"IsolatedCommand"="cmd.exe /c takeown /f \"%1\" && icacls \"%1\" /grant administrators:F"

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\dllfile\shell\runas]
@="Take Ownership"
"HasLUAShield"=""
"NoWorkingDirectory"=""

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\dllfile\shell\runas\command]
@="cmd.exe /c takeown /f \"%1\" && icacls \"%1\" /grant administrators:F"
"IsolatedCommand"="cmd.exe /c takeown /f \"%1\" && icacls \"%1\" /grant administrators:F"

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\Directory\shell\runas]
@="Take Ownership"
"HasLUAShield"=""
"NoWorkingDirectory"=""

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\Directory\shell\runas\command]
@="cmd.exe /c takeown /f \"%1\" /r /d y && icacls \"%1\" /grant administrators:F /t"
"IsolatedCommand"="cmd.exe /c takeown /f \"%1\" /r /d y && icacls \"%1\" /grant administrators:F /t"
I can't remember for the life of me if I then went into the parent folder/drive properties window and took ownership in there of the folder and all sub-folders.

Any-hows, now back to full viewing/editing capabilities
 
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TrainableMan

^ The World's First ^
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The locks tend to be system areas. Sometimes it just doesn't want you to go in that way, instead it expects you to use the new libraries (all they are are pointers to the actual area).

Also it tries to protect your files from other users of the system and users are stored as a Computer/Username. Since you have dual OS you may have used the same username (or maybe you didn't) but even so if the computer names are different then the file ownership would belong to a "different" ID as far as W7 knows.

You can disable UAC which may help.

There is a scrpt you can install called "Take Ownership" which adds your login account with read/write access to every file in every folder under the folder you are sitting on. If you run this on Documents and Settings you may be there 10 minutes waiting for the script to run.
http://www.howtogeek.com/howto/windows-vista/add-take-ownership-to-explorer-right-click-menu-in-vista/
 
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Nibiru2012

Quick Scotty, beam me up!
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Hmmm... all these registry hacks.
 

TrainableMan

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Hack the planet!

It's the only way to fly!
 
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