OT Firefox question


P

philo 

Not Win7 but I've seen good help here.

The spell checker on Firefox 23 (and all previous versions) /always/
reverts to Great Britain rather than US.

I thought I fixed this by disabling the GB language pack, but a few days
later it went back to British.

How can I get settings to stick?


Less importantly, is there any way to uninstall the GB language pack,
the only option given is "disable"
 
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P

Paul

philo said:
Not Win7 but I've seen good help here.

The spell checker on Firefox 23 (and all previous versions) /always/
reverts to Great Britain rather than US.

I thought I fixed this by disabling the GB language pack, but a few days
later it went back to British.

How can I get settings to stick?


Less importantly, is there any way to uninstall the GB language pack,
the only option given is "disable"
Some things to check here.

http://support.mozilla.org/en-US/questions/932326

"spellchecker.dictionary pref on the about:config page"

If you go to the URL bar, and enter "about:config", the configuration
editor becomes available. In there, you can edit existing
entries, and assign new values. For items with binary
"True/False" values, just clicking the line will toggle
the state. While fields that take numbers, you type in a
new value.

The article above, also mentions the possibility of changes
not being saved. That's not a problem for about:config - as
it has no undo function, and the changes are immediate (as
far as them being stored in the profile). So while a change
made in a GUI preference, might not get saved properly,
about:config has the dangerous feature of storing things,
right or wrong (no undo, no cancel).

If you can figure out where the profile is, you can copy
that to a safe place (while exited from Firefox). And that
copy is then your insurance against accidents you might
have in about:config. That's how I handle the "no Undo" problem.
If I damage about:config, I just copy back the backup I made
minutes before hand.

If I still couldn't achieve the desired result, I'd go hunting
for the offending dictionary file, and delete it.

Paul
 
P

philo 

Some things to check here.

http://support.mozilla.org/en-US/questions/932326

"spellchecker.dictionary pref on the about:config page"

If you go to the URL bar, and enter "about:config", the configuration
editor becomes available. In there, you can edit existing
entries, and assign new values. For items with binary
"True/False" values, just clicking the line will toggle
the state. While fields that take numbers, you type in a
new value.



Thanks you

In about:config

the language is set to US

If my setting changes, I will look there and see if it also has changed



I do know who to backup my configuration so I am not too worried about
ruing anything....plus Firefox has a "reset" option which I've used in
emergencies
 
P

philo 

I manually deleted the unwanted entries from the Firefox "Dictionaries"
folder and all but US English have now been eliminated.

That should do it now.
 
K

Kenny Cargill

US English is not proper English, leave it at GB English!

Kenny Cargill

"philo " wrote in message
I manually deleted the unwanted entries from the Firefox "Dictionaries"
folder and all but US English have now been eliminated.

That should do it now.
 
R

Roger Mills

Not Win7 but I've seen good help here.

The spell checker on Firefox 23 (and all previous versions) /always/
reverts to Great Britain rather than US.

I thought I fixed this by disabling the GB language pack, but a few days
later it went back to British.

How can I get settings to stick?


Less importantly, is there any way to uninstall the GB language pack,
the only option given is "disable"

It's interesting to hear that FF is enforcing *proper* spellings! <g>
--
Cheers,
Roger
____________
Please reply to Newsgroup. Whilst email address is valid, it is seldom
checked.
 
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R

Rob

If you want friendship, learn Spanish
If you want love, learn Italian
If you want sex, learn French
If you want culture, learn British English
If you want money ....
Learn Chinese?
 
P

philo 

US English is not proper English, leave it at GB English!

Kenny Cargill

"philo " wrote in message I manually deleted the unwanted entries from the Firefox "Dictionaries"
folder and all but US English have now been eliminated.

That should do it now.


Interesting side note:


I was listening to a radio program on language and someone asked when
the US pronunciation started it's transition away from British.

Turns out that it was the British who developed the "accent" as the
nouveau rich sought a way to distance themselves from "commoners".


I have found an article here:

http://mentalfloss.com/article/29761/when-did-americans-lose-their-british-accents
 
B

Bob Henson

G

Gene E. Bloch

Interesting side note:

I was listening to a radio program on language and someone asked when
the US pronunciation started it's transition away from British.

Turns out that it was the British who developed the "accent" as the
nouveau rich sought a way to distance themselves from "commoners".

I have found an article here:

http://mentalfloss.com/article/29761/when-did-americans-lose-their-british-accents
Thanks. The article makes good sense to me, as a life-long language
dilettante. It seems reasoned and not over-dramatic.

Rule one in language is that it changes, and there is no reason to
suspect (there's good reason not to, in fact) that language was changing
in America and not changing in England.

Just as one example in my own experience, the accent has changed in my
native region of the US during my lifetime...

The truth is that I'm radically startled by how much the US and Britain
sound alike, and how many slang and idiomatic terms - and even errors in
grammar - are the same on both sides of the Atlantic.

The differences don't surprise me at all.
 
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P

philo 

On 08/12/2013 09:42 AM, Bob Henson wrote:

Methinks someone has a hyperactive imagination.

If it came from one source I'd be skeptical but there are just way too
many reliable sources confirming it.

As close as a Google search
 
P

philo 

Thanks. The article makes good sense to me, as a life-long language
dilettante. It seems reasoned and not over-dramatic.

Rule one in language is that it changes, and there is no reason to
suspect (there's good reason not to, in fact) that language was changing
in America and not changing in England.

Just as one example in my own experience, the accent has changed in my
native region of the US during my lifetime...

The truth is that I'm radically startled by how much the US and Britain
sound alike, and how many slang and idiomatic terms - and even errors in
grammar - are the same on both sides of the Atlantic.

The differences don't surprise me at all.


Me either. BTW: I've recently discovered a wonderful radio program

http://www.waywordradio.org/


It's quite fascinating.
 
P

Philip Herlihy

....

Interesting side note:


I was listening to a radio program on language and someone asked when
the US pronunciation started it's transition away from British.

Turns out that it was the British who developed the "accent" as the
nouveau rich sought a way to distance themselves from "commoners".


I have found an article here:

http://mentalfloss.com/article/29761/when-did-americans-lose-their-british-accents
I've heard a convincing argument that the 'soft' character of French
(compare with German or Italian) comes from the fashion in the 17th
Century for the upper echelons to plaster their faces with powder, which
would tend to crack if they moved their mouths much. Of course this
gradually became the 'approved' way to speak. (I find it much harder to
'tune in' to a stream of French than to German or Italian, which I know
less!).
 
P

philo 

I've heard a convincing argument that the 'soft' character of French
(compare with German or Italian) comes from the fashion in the 17th
Century for the upper echelons to plaster their faces with powder, which
would tend to crack if they moved their mouths much. Of course this
gradually became the 'approved' way to speak. (I find it much harder to
'tune in' to a stream of French than to German or Italian, which I know
less!).

Very interesting.

Maybe politicians today should be required to powder their faces.

Better still: use glue!
 
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E

Ed Cryer

Philip said:
I've heard a convincing argument that the 'soft' character of French
(compare with German or Italian) comes from the fashion in the 17th
Century for the upper echelons to plaster their faces with powder, which
would tend to crack if they moved their mouths much. Of course this
gradually became the 'approved' way to speak. (I find it much harder to
'tune in' to a stream of French than to German or Italian, which I know
less!).
I've heard that the Spanish lisp is due to King Ferdinand III of
Castile. He had a lisp, and all the courtiers followed suit so as to
lessen his embarrassment.
Ah, ah. Some people will believe anything.

BTW I find French easiest of all to follow. I guess it's just a simple
question of greater familiarity and more knowledge of it than with
Spanish or German.

Ed
 
P

philo 

I've heard that the Spanish lisp is due to King Ferdinand III of
Castile. He had a lisp, and all the courtiers followed suit so as to
lessen his embarrassment.
Ah, ah. Some people will believe anything.

When I was in school we leaned both standard Spanish
and Castillian.
I was not a great student but I am pretty sure the "King's lisp" story
is just a legend.
 
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