Network Configuration Question


G

G. Morgan

Juan said:
G. Morgan has written on 4/15/2013 11:29 PM:

I created a Backtrack boot disk and booted it on my laptop. Had no idea
what to do when I saw

boot:

so I hit Enter.

It eventually booted to a Unix command line prompt. Now what? I thought
this had a GNOME GUI.
type:

startx
 
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J

Juan Wei

G. Morgan has written on 4/16/2013 12:55 AM:
type:

startx
Did that. Screen goes sort of blank. I.e., not exactly a black screen
but there's nothing on it (no icons and no cursor).
 
A

Andy Burns

Juan said:
G. Morgan has written on 4/16/2013 12:55 AM:


Did that. Screen goes sort of blank. I.e., not exactly a black screen
but there's nothing on it (no icons and no cursor).
"gnome-session"

you might want to use "startx &"
 
G

G. Morgan

Andy said:
"gnome-session"

you might want to use "startx &"
And RTFM, this thread took a 90° turn.

Not at all Windows 7 related. There are better groups for discussing pen
testing and related tools.
 
G

G. Morgan

Juan said:
Did that. Screen goes sort of blank. I.e., not exactly a black screen
but there's nothing on it (no icons and no cursor).
There are Windows tools that can crack WEP too, Google for them.
 
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P

Paul

Juan said:
G. Morgan has written on 4/16/2013 12:55 AM:

Did that. Screen goes sort of blank. I.e., not exactly a black screen
but there's nothing on it (no icons and no cursor).
Using a search engine, search for:

man startx

to learn more about what it does, and what files it uses.

http://linux.die.net/man/1/startx

In particular, create an .xinitrc file in the home directory.

vi ~/.xinitrc

Then, use that manual page, for hints.

xterm -geometry +0-100 &
exec gnome-session

I put at least one "xterm" in the file, so I'll have
a terminal to work in. Even if the decoration stage
of startup fails, then I can work in the xterm
terminal.

Experiment with that sort of thing.

If it's a live CD, you end up doing it every time.
If you know how to set up a "persistent store" for the
live CD, that file can be preserved between sessions.
I have a USB flash with Ubuntu on it, which includes
a 4GB persistent store image file, for recording such
changes as an ~/.xinitrc file. Depending on the distro,
there may be other ways to indicate a persistent store
is present and available. For example, without "installing"
a Linux distro, you can provide storage for personal files.

On some distros, the problem is, the .xinitrc or equivalent,

/etc/X11/xinit/xinitrc

the one provided by default, is actually wrong. And then
you have to "hack your way out of a mess". Particularly
discouraging, for such errors to exist after this many
years have passed.

Paul
 
C

Char Jackson

A typical wifi device should only ask for SSID.
I assume you meant password or passphrase. You shouldn't need to provide an
SSID prior to connecting to a wireless network since that is one that is
typically provided to you to help you identify the network.
IF you want your friend to be able to log on to the router and
change settings, then he/she/it will need the router UID and P/W.
Yeah, but no one would routinely provide that info. It's not required in
order to grant network access.
IF you want your friend to be a part of your network, then
he/she/it will need the network ID or domain ID, UID, and a p/w,
and the router SSID.
'Maybe' for the first few items and 'no' for the last item.
 
C

Char Jackson

Is there a disadvantage to disabling the SSID broadcast? I presume that
will hide the WAP from the idle who walk down the hallway rattling all
the doorknobs...
Most people who disable SSID broadcast say they do it for security reasons,
not realizing that doing so does nothing to enhance security. Two of the
disadvantages, minor though they may be, are that some systems have a hard
time connecting to networks where the SSID isn't being broadcast, and
neighbors setting up their own networks may not see the one with the hidden
SSID, inadvertently putting their network on the same channel.
 
C

Char Jackson

G. Morgan has written on 4/14/2013 11:17 PM:

That means that someone with a laptop and the Backtrack live CD will
have to park in my driveway.
Is the rest of your property surrounded by a moat of boiling oil? If not, I
assume someone could approach from almost any side, and not just the
driveway. Depending on the equipment they have, they might not have to get
any closer than a half mile, or more. Sometimes much more.
 
C

Char Jackson

WEP password security was broken years ago. You can easily download
programs to let you log in to a WEP secured access point almost as
quickly as typing the password. Even WPA is getting a bit weak by modern
standards. WPA2 should be your minimum level of security on a wireless
access point, using a strong, non-deafult, non-dictionary password, and
an SSID that isn't the one set by the supplier.
And with WPS enabled, it might not matter in the slightest what the password
is made of. Instead of trying to guess the network password, it's always a
refreshing change when the router willingly coughs it up on request.
 
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P

Paul in Houston TX

Char said:
I assume you meant password or passphrase. You shouldn't need to provide an
SSID prior to connecting to a wireless network since that is one that is
typically provided to you to help you identify the network.
Yes. Thinking password and writing SSID.
Thank for the correction. :)
 
J

Juan Wei

Char Jackson has written on 4/17/2013 12:45 AM:
Is the rest of your property surrounded by a moat of boiling oil? If not, I
assume someone could approach from almost any side, and not just the
driveway. Depending on the equipment they have, they might not have to get
any closer than a half mile, or more. Sometimes much more.
So they could have equipment that is much much more sensitive than say a
budget laptop or a smartphone?
 
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Z

Zaphod Beeblebrox

Is the rest of your property surrounded by a moat of boiling oil? If not, I
assume someone could approach from almost any side, and not just the
driveway. Depending on the equipment they have, they might not have to get
any closer than a half mile, or more. Sometimes much more.
So they could have equipment that is much much more sensitive than say a
budget laptop or a smartphone?[/QUOTE]

Sensitive? Sure, but sensitive <> expensive, a Pringles can will do it.
Google "Pringles can wifi antenna" for instructions on how to make a
directional antenna on the cheap with amazing range.

Yes, Skiddies, wannabes as well as some truly nefarious types do this
sort of thing all the time.

--
Zaphod

Arthur: All my life I've had this strange feeling that there's
something big and sinister going on in the world.
Slartibartfast: No, that's perfectly normal paranoia. Everyone in the
universe gets that.
 

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