Malicious Software Removal Tool


K

Kilowatt

Should I install this? Why is there a license agreement to install it
and it is not installed like other patches? Does this cause problems?

I already use Mcafee because it is free for using ATT as my ISP.
 
M

Muad'Dib

Should I install this? Why is there a license agreement to install it
and it is not installed like other patches? Does this cause problems?

I already use Mcafee because it is free for using ATT as my ISP.
It is from Microsoft, and does come through their update system. It is
safe to install, so just agree with the license. It does NOT run like a
regular anti-virus program, will run once to scan for what it is looking
for, then sit dormant until the next one comes through updates. Lastly
it is not a "patch," it is just a little program sent through the update
system. I'll not go into particulars here, just Google, Bing, Yahoo, or
whatever to gain a better understanding. Search engines are your
friends. Use them.

G'day
 
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P

Paul

Should I install this? Why is there a license agreement to install it
and it is not installed like other patches? Does this cause problems?

I already use Mcafee because it is free for using ATT as my ISP.
It's a one-shot scan for "high-runner" malware. Microsoft monitors
the most popular malware (the ones with high propagation), and creates
a definition file to match. Then, when Patch Tuesday comes, and you
get your updates, you get that month's definitions. It means you're
not doing anything remotely resembling real-time protection. It's mainly
for people who don't maintain their computers, and Microsoft is trying
to reduce the "zombie" population of computers with malware running.
Effectively, a short scan that runs, because you happened to do
Windows Update.

The tool can also be run manually. I think when it runs automatically,
it might just sweep the system folder. I don't think it looks at the
entire C:. Running it manually, may give a slightly more thorough
scan, but then the definitions it has loaded, don't cover everything.

Considering how many zombie and uncared-for machines there are,
it's a good idea. It improves the situation slightly, for
Microsoft's ability to "pour water on the worst fires" without
completely solving the problem.

Paul
 
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K

Ken Springer

It's a one-shot scan for "high-runner" malware. Microsoft monitors
the most popular malware (the ones with high propagation), and creates
a definition file to match. Then, when Patch Tuesday comes, and you
get your updates, you get that month's definitions. It means you're
not doing anything remotely resembling real-time protection. It's mainly
for people who don't maintain their computers, and Microsoft is trying
to reduce the "zombie" population of computers with malware running.
Effectively, a short scan that runs, because you happened to do
Windows Update.

The tool can also be run manually. I think when it runs automatically,
it might just sweep the system folder. I don't think it looks at the
entire C:. Running it manually, may give a slightly more thorough
scan, but then the definitions it has loaded, don't cover everything.
I'm not sure what the "quick" scan covers, but if something is found,
you may be asked to do a full scan, which includes the entire computer's
hard drives.

www.microsoft.com/security/pc-security/malware-removal.aspx
support.microsoft.com/kb/890830
Considering how many zombie and uncared-for machines there are,
it's a good idea. It improves the situation slightly, for
Microsoft's ability to "pour water on the worst fires" without
completely solving the problem.

--
Ken

Mac OS X 10.6.8
Firefox 10.0.2
Thunderbird 10.0.2
LibreOffice 3.5.0 rc3
 

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