JAVA


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B

Big Steel

After reading this article I have to wonder if I should ever let Java
be installed on my notebook.

A close look at how Oracle installs deceptive software with Java
updates

http://www.zdnet.com/a-close-look-at-how-oracle-installs-deceptive-software-with-java-updates-7000010038/
I had to install Java just to run an application on my machine.
Otherwise, the interactive Web pages would not show. Now that I am done
with the site, I plan on uninstalling Java off the machine. It was never
on the Win 7 machine to begin with, so it was never an issue.
 
S

s|b

After reading this article I have to wonder if I should ever let Java
be installed on my notebook.

A close look at how Oracle installs deceptive software with Java
updates
Only if you let it.

If you want a reason not to install Java, then I'd choose the presence
of security leaks. Oracle released 7 update 11 to solve one security
leak, but it seems it's still vulnerable because of a second security
leak. To my knowledge Mozilla is blocking the Java plugin in Firefox
because of this.

If you don't need Java, don't install it.
 
G

Gene E. Bloch

And you must opt out on every update
At least one program (IIRC, Adobe Reader) changes the update
configuration every time you update.

I prefer "Inform me and let me decide when to do it", but the program
switches to Automatic each time. That would make it hard to skip the
forced install of junk, although that program doesn't offer such an
option (again, that's IIRC).

Luckily, the one in question notifies me that, as they put it, "Your
configuration has changed" and gives me a button to go into it. Each and
every time...

The word 'disingenuous' comes to mind.
 
S

Steve Hayes

At least one program (IIRC, Adobe Reader) changes the update
configuration every time you update.

I prefer "Inform me and let me decide when to do it", but the program
switches to Automatic each time. That would make it hard to skip the
forced install of junk, although that program doesn't offer such an
option (again, that's IIRC).
What is the best way to uninstall the foistware if, in a moment of
inattention, you have let it slip in?
 
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W

..winston

"Steve Hayes" wrote in message
What is the best way to uninstall the foistware if, in a moment of
inattention, you have let it slip in?
Foist ware is nothing new or unique to Oracle (Java).
- Google Chrome and a variety of toolbars have been packaged and pre-checked to install with a variety of programs for quite some
time.

The usual routes to remove/disable undesirable/inadvertent installations on Win7
- look in Programs and Features
- search the source for an uninstaller/remover
- uncheck items in System Configuration
- stop items in Windows services
 
S

Steve Hayes

"Steve Hayes" wrote in message

Foist ware is nothing new or unique to Oracle (Java).
- Google Chrome and a variety of toolbars have been packaged and pre-checked to install with a variety of programs for quite some
time.
I know. Every time Avast antivirus updates I tell it not to install Google
Chrome.
The usual routes to remove/disable undesirable/inadvertent installations on Win7
- look in Programs and Features
- search the source for an uninstaller/remover
- uncheck items in System Configuration
- stop items in Windows services
I'm not sure where they all hide. If I type an unknown URL in Firefox, an Ask
search screen comes up. I couldn't find it in the Firefox add-ons and
plug-ins.
 
E

Ed Cryer

s|b said:
Only if you let it.

If you want a reason not to install Java, then I'd choose the presence
of security leaks. Oracle released 7 update 11 to solve one security
leak, but it seems it's still vulnerable because of a second security
leak. To my knowledge Mozilla is blocking the Java plugin in Firefox
because of this.

If you don't need Java, don't install it.
In my Firefox plug-ins, Java and Foxit Reader are both marked as having
known security problems. FF disabled Java some time ago, but not Foxit.
I can enable Java with a click.

Ed
 
S

Shoe

In my Firefox plug-ins, Java and Foxit Reader are both marked as having
known security problems. FF disabled Java some time ago, but not Foxit.
I can enable Java with a click.

Ed
The message here is to never, ever allow automatic updates. Many sites
include this unwanted junk with their updates.
 
E

Ed Cryer

Shoe said:
The message here is to never, ever allow automatic updates. Many sites
include this unwanted junk with their updates.
A message I learned many years ago. I try to forestall all auto updates,
including Windows itself; it's set to check but ask me before applying.

Ed
 
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S

SC Tom

Ed Cryer said:
A message I learned many years ago. I try to forestall all auto updates,
including Windows itself; it's set to check but ask me before applying.

Ed
I'm with you on that. I can't remember the last time I allowed any kind of
automatic update (probably early Win95). On programs like Java or Adobe, the
first thing I've always done is go into the settings and disable
auto-updating. Don't want to get something I didn't ask for :)

One thing I found out abut Java is that even though auto-update is unchecked
in its settings, it will still write an auto-update key to
HKLM\Software\Microsoft\Current Version\Run. Easily deleted though. And
Adobe will *rewrite* an update key, even after auto-update is disabled and
the key deleted. I don't have any Adobe products installed now, and my Java
is disabled. Even though I've read about it, I still haven't visited a site
that said I needed it. Guess I'm not cruisin' in the right circles ;-)
 
E

Ed Cryer

SC said:
I'm with you on that. I can't remember the last time I allowed any kind
of automatic update (probably early Win95). On programs like Java or
Adobe, the first thing I've always done is go into the settings and
disable auto-updating. Don't want to get something I didn't ask for :)

One thing I found out abut Java is that even though auto-update is
unchecked in its settings, it will still write an auto-update key to
HKLM\Software\Microsoft\Current Version\Run. Easily deleted though. And
Adobe will *rewrite* an update key, even after auto-update is disabled
and the key deleted. I don't have any Adobe products installed now, and
my Java is disabled. Even though I've read about it, I still haven't
visited a site that said I needed it. Guess I'm not cruisin' in the
right circles ;-)

You have to be on your toes on the Net these days.
It was bad enough when Google used to slip in their update facilities
into Services. The other day I fell for a scam that appears so blatant
now that I know about it that I kick myself. But this is how it happened.

I have a file from my Samsung Bluray-recorder; TV recording. It has an
SRF file extension; Sony Raw File. I got led by Google to here;
http://www.pcpitstop.com/fileextension/extension/Server~Response~File/srf.html
and decided I'd try wlxphotogallery.exe. I clicked download, it asked me
for my email address so that it could send me the URL, I entered it, got
an email with a URL, which turned out to be non-existent. But it
explained that I might be getting advertising emails from their
affiliates and such like.
Sheesh! I could have kicked myself for falling for that.
Anyway, so far no spam's arrived, but it will, I guess.

Ed
 
S

s|b

In my Firefox plug-ins, Java and Foxit Reader are both marked as having
known security problems. FF disabled Java some time ago, but not Foxit.
I can enable Java with a click.
Fx doesn't recognize my Foxit plugin, never has. It's marked as 'Unknown
plugin'.

Foxit has released a new version though: 5.4.5.0114.
 
S

s|b

And you must opt out on every update
Irfanview comes with Google Chrome and Foxit Reader tries to install the
Ask.com toolbar as well. Skype tries to change your default search
engine to Bing and so on.

I guess that's the price of being "free" ? If you pay attention, you can
avoid unwanted crap being installed.
 
A

Andy Burns

Ed said:
In my Firefox plug-ins, Java and Foxit Reader are both marked as having
known security problems. FF disabled Java some time ago, but not Foxit.
I can enable Java with a click.
I have plugins.click_to_play set to true in about:config, that stops
flash and java from loading on pages unless I want them to load.
 
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E

Ed Cryer

s|b said:
Fx doesn't recognize my Foxit plugin, never has. It's marked as 'Unknown
plugin'.

Foxit has released a new version though: 5.4.5.0114.
Presumably you're using the Adobe Acrobat plug-in, then.
I have both that and Foxit 2.2.3.111.
I can switch between them using enable & disable.
I've checked for plug-in updates; only one available, for a download
prog, not Foxit.

Strange but true!!

Ed
 
D

DanS

And you must opt out on every update
I don't see that as an issue.

It's an issue if you don't have the opportunity to do so.

I also wouldn't call what could be installed it "deceptive" s/w either.

The Ask toolbar does exactly what it's supposed to do, it adds a toolbar
to the browser to easily search using Ask, and I'm sure the McAfee thing
works exactly as McAfee tells you it does.
 
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G

Gene E. Bloch

What is the best way to uninstall the foistware if, in a moment of
inattention, you have let it slip in?
I don't know, because I never screwed up that way :)

More honestly: I just don't remember in any detail.

I would try using Windows Uninstall in the usual way, or use IObit or
Revo uninstaller.

You can find help for some tough cases by searching with Google - or
even with Ask :)
 

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