How long will Win7 be offered for sale?


B

Bert

Has Microsoft given any end date for the commercial availability of
copies of Win 7 Professional?

I won't be building a new machine for a while and really don't want to
switch to Windows 8 then.

Should I pick up a couple of copies of Win 7 now?
 
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G

Gordonbp

Has Microsoft given any end date for the commercial availability of
copies of Win 7 Professional?

I won't be building a new machine for a while and really don't want to
switch to Windows 8 then.

Should I pick up a couple of copies of Win 7 now?
I would think it's going to be available for years - commercial
organisations who have only just migrated from XP to 7 aren't going to
purchase 8 anytime soon....
 
J

John Williamson

Gordonbp said:
I would think it's going to be available for years - commercial
organisations who have only just migrated from XP to 7 aren't going to
purchase 8 anytime soon....
Mode = Cynic> No, they'll wait until Windows 9 or a quick and easy
registry hack becomes available. <Mode off>

Unless someone talks them into buying touchscreens and devises a fitness
program involving less mouse usage.
 
B

Bob I

I would think it's going to be available for years - commercial
organisations who have only just migrated from XP to 7 aren't going to
purchase 8 anytime soon....
Commercial organizations with Volume Licensing and Software Assurance
can legally install (back level ) prior versions. IOW they can buy more
new licenses when Win 9 comes out and install XP if they want.
 
W

...winston

Typically the retail distribution (from MSFT distributors) end date has been one year after the last o/s and two years after the
last o/s for OEM distribution. Neither precludes the availability of existing inventory on-hand after those dates nor any 3rd
party or personal resellers (e.g Ebay etc.)

What also normally occurs during the first (1 yr) time frame....full retail and system builder versions diminish since the
supply/demand pipeline is constrained by inventorying more than one version (and MSFT's willingness to fill any pipeline at a
previous rate).

The business climate imo does not have an impact to as great extent as some might believe on the consumer supply, since the
majority of distribution to those occurs via purchasing OEM machines or volume licensing.

Imo, if you plan on moving up to Win7...it might be prudent to not wait too long to purchase Win7 Pro.

--
....winston
msft mvp consumer apps


"Bert" wrote in message
Has Microsoft given any end date for the commercial availability of
copies of Win 7 Professional?

I won't be building a new machine for a while and really don't want to
switch to Windows 8 then.

Should I pick up a couple of copies of Win 7 now?
 
B

BillW50

Typically the retail distribution (from MSFT distributors) end date has
been one year after the last o/s and two years after the last o/s for
OEM distribution. Neither precludes the availability of existing
inventory on-hand after those dates nor any 3rd party or personal
resellers (e.g Ebay etc.)

What also normally occurs during the first (1 yr) time frame....full
retail and system builder versions diminish since the supply/demand
pipeline is constrained by inventorying more than one version (and
MSFT's willingness to fill any pipeline at a previous rate).

The business climate imo does not have an impact to as great extent as
some might believe on the consumer supply, since the majority of
distribution to those occurs via purchasing OEM machines or volume
licensing.

Imo, if you plan on moving up to Win7...it might be prudent to not wait
too long to purchase Win7 Pro.
Or you can purchase an OEM version of Windows 8 Pro. Which gives you
downgrade rights to Windows 7 Pro or Vista Business.

http://www.microsoft.com/OEM/en/licensing/sblicensing/Pages/downgrade_rights.aspx#fbid=T2CoEPkCQYx
 
P

Paul

BillW50 said:
Or you can purchase an OEM version of Windows 8 Pro. Which gives you
downgrade rights to Windows 7 Pro or Vista Business.

http://www.microsoft.com/OEM/en/licensing/sblicensing/Pages/downgrade_rights.aspx#fbid=T2CoEPkCQYx
But quoting from that page...

"To downgrade Microsoft Windows or Windows Server software, customers must:

* Purchase a PC preinstalled with Windows or Windows Server software. <----
* Accept the End User Software License Terms.
* Perform the downgrade or authorize a third party to perform it on their behalf.

In other words, downgrade rights are for "royalty OEM" versions,
not "system builder OEM" versions. Basically, it allows an
end user to buy a computer with an OS he doesn't want, and
move to get an OS he does want. "royalty OEM" is what is
put on a Dell/HP/Acer/Gateway machine.

Whereas, with the system builder OEM version (OEM copy on a DVD
from Newegg), it's just a matter of purchasing the OS you want.
Not going the indirect route of buying something you don't want,
and downgrading.

Downgrading is offered to Dell/HP/Acer/Gateway, so the OS choice
won't be an impediment to selling hardware. Within narrow
boundaries, the customer can be satisfied.

Paul
 
B

BillW50

But quoting from that page...

"To downgrade Microsoft Windows or Windows Server software, customers must:

* Purchase a PC preinstalled with Windows or Windows Server software. <----
* Accept the End User Software License Terms.
* Perform the downgrade or authorize a third party to perform it on
their behalf.

In other words, downgrade rights are for "royalty OEM" versions,
not "system builder OEM" versions. Basically, it allows an
end user to buy a computer with an OS he doesn't want, and
move to get an OS he does want. "royalty OEM" is what is
put on a Dell/HP/Acer/Gateway machine.

Whereas, with the system builder OEM version (OEM copy on a DVD
from Newegg), it's just a matter of purchasing the OS you want.
Not going the indirect route of buying something you don't want,
and downgrading.

Downgrading is offered to Dell/HP/Acer/Gateway, so the OS choice
won't be an impediment to selling hardware. Within narrow
boundaries, the customer can be satisfied.

Paul
"Royalty OEM" version is a new term for me. Thanks Paul!
 
P

Paul

BillW50 said:
"Royalty OEM" version is a new term for me. Thanks Paul!
And that's royalty as in "royalty payment", versus
"Queen of England Royalty" :)

The ole fifty bucks per machine kind of royalty payment.

Paul
 
W

...winston

Correct. Downgrade rights are from OEM pre-installed Windows machines from contracted OEM suppliers.

That changes with Win8...downgrade rights are Win8 Pro only and afiak now incumbent upon the user/buyer to provide the earlier o/s.

....w

"Paul" wrote in message
Or you can purchase an OEM version of Windows 8 Pro. Which gives you downgrade rights to Windows 7 Pro or Vista Business.

http://www.microsoft.com/OEM/en/licensing/sblicensing/Pages/downgrade_rights.aspx#fbid=T2CoEPkCQYx
But quoting from that page...

"To downgrade Microsoft Windows or Windows Server software, customers must:

* Purchase a PC preinstalled with Windows or Windows Server software. <----
* Accept the End User Software License Terms.
* Perform the downgrade or authorize a third party to perform it on their behalf.

In other words, downgrade rights are for "royalty OEM" versions,
not "system builder OEM" versions. Basically, it allows an
end user to buy a computer with an OS he doesn't want, and
move to get an OS he does want. "royalty OEM" is what is
put on a Dell/HP/Acer/Gateway machine.

Whereas, with the system builder OEM version (OEM copy on a DVD
from Newegg), it's just a matter of purchasing the OS you want.
Not going the indirect route of buying something you don't want,
and downgrading.

Downgrading is offered to Dell/HP/Acer/Gateway, so the OS choice
won't be an impediment to selling hardware. Within narrow
boundaries, the customer can be satisfied.

Paul
 
P

Paul

....winston said:
Correct. Downgrade rights are from OEM pre-installed Windows machines
from contracted OEM suppliers.

That changes with Win8...downgrade rights are Win8 Pro only and afiak
now incumbent upon the user/buyer to provide the earlier o/s.

...w
I used the $39.95 downloadable version, and installed it to a
blank disk. Next, ran the "Refresh your PC" function, which
partially reinstalls the system. (There's a recipe for this,
so I didn't think it up. It's along the lines of the
"double install method" used previously.) The system was activated
after that. So no pre-existing OS was used during the install.

I've had upgrade versions of Windows before, where the installer
asked you to insert the previous OS installer CD. And this install,
didn't even try that. It just installed. After the first install
(with license key typed in), it did not activate. But after
the system refresh, and as many reboots as it felt it needed,
after that I checked the system control panel, and it was
activated. (I also tried the slmgr recipe, but that didn't work.
I had to spend the extra time on the refresh thing.)

(.bat file didn't work, but refresh did)

http://www.eightforums.com/tutorials/13375-clean-install-windows-8-upgrade.html

Paul
 
B

BillW50

I used the $39.95 downloadable version, and installed it to a
blank disk. Next, ran the "Refresh your PC" function, which
partially reinstalls the system. (There's a recipe for this,
so I didn't think it up. It's along the lines of the
"double install method" used previously.) The system was activated
after that. So no pre-existing OS was used during the install.

I've had upgrade versions of Windows before, where the installer
asked you to insert the previous OS installer CD. And this install,
didn't even try that. It just installed. After the first install
(with license key typed in), it did not activate. But after
the system refresh, and as many reboots as it felt it needed,
after that I checked the system control panel, and it was
activated. (I also tried the slmgr recipe, but that didn't work.
I had to spend the extra time on the refresh thing.)

(.bat file didn't work, but refresh did)

http://www.eightforums.com/tutorials/13375-clean-install-windows-8-upgrade.html


Paul
I never found it to care what you are upgrading from yet. Even a fresh
drive it didn't care. Although if you are online, it automatically in
the background activates.
 
W

...winston

What did you use to purchase and download Win8 ?
- a machine with a qualifying o/s :)

Inserting a prior o/s system cd/dvd hasn't been in place since XP.

...w

"Paul" wrote in message
....winston said:
Correct. Downgrade rights are from OEM pre-installed Windows machines
from contracted OEM suppliers.

That changes with Win8...downgrade rights are Win8 Pro only and afiak
now incumbent upon the user/buyer to provide the earlier o/s.

...w
I used the $39.95 downloadable version, and installed it to a
blank disk. Next, ran the "Refresh your PC" function, which
partially reinstalls the system. (There's a recipe for this,
so I didn't think it up. It's along the lines of the
"double install method" used previously.) The system was activated
after that. So no pre-existing OS was used during the install.

I've had upgrade versions of Windows before, where the installer
asked you to insert the previous OS installer CD. And this install,
didn't even try that. It just installed. After the first install
(with license key typed in), it did not activate. But after
the system refresh, and as many reboots as it felt it needed,
after that I checked the system control panel, and it was
activated. (I also tried the slmgr recipe, but that didn't work.
I had to spend the extra time on the refresh thing.)

(.bat file didn't work, but refresh did)

http://www.eightforums.com/tutorials/13375-clean-install-windows-8-upgrade.html

Paul
 
P

Paul

....winston said:
What did you use to purchase and download Win8 ?
- a machine with a qualifying o/s :)

Inserting a prior o/s system cd/dvd hasn't been in place since XP.

...w
Someone posting here, has already ordered multiple OSes with
their order machine. So the qualifying OS is not being
disqualified by the act of purchasing. If that
were the case, they wouldn't have been able to order
their second OS copy.

Paul
 
W

...winston

Your still misunderstanding the licensing agreement.
Technically feasible is not the same a legality.
- nor has it been for quite some time

....winston
winston msft consumer apps

"Paul" wrote in message
....winston said:
What did you use to purchase and download Win8 ?
- a machine with a qualifying o/s :)

Inserting a prior o/s system cd/dvd hasn't been in place since XP.

...w
Someone posting here, has already ordered multiple OSes with
their order machine. So the qualifying OS is not being
disqualified by the act of purchasing. If that
were the case, they wouldn't have been able to order
their second OS copy.

Paul
 
W

Wolf K

Your still misunderstanding the licensing agreement.
Technically feasible is not the same a legality.
- nor has it been for quite some time

...winston
I can see no legal obstacle to installing any OS, or any number of OSs
you like on any hardware you have purchased. There may be hardware
limits, but that's another issue.

have good day,
 
W

...winston

This stuff is pretty simple.

Licensing = one license per pc/device

The ability to install the same o/s (upgrade, full version, ectc.) with the same key on multiple devices while technically feasible
via a variety of methods does not change or modify the legal aspects of MSFT's licensing.


--
....winston
msft mvp consumer apps

"Wolf K" wrote in message
Your still misunderstanding the licensing agreement.
Technically feasible is not the same a legality.
- nor has it been for quite some time

...winston
I can see no legal obstacle to installing any OS, or any number of OSs
you like on any hardware you have purchased. There may be hardware
limits, but that's another issue.

have good day,
 
B

BillW50

Your still misunderstanding the licensing agreement.
Technically feasible is not the same a legality.
- nor has it been for quite some time

...winston
winston msft consumer apps

in message

Someone posting here, has already ordered multiple OSes with
their order machine. So the qualifying OS is not being
disqualified by the act of purchasing. If that
were the case, they wouldn't have been able to order
their second OS copy.

Paul
Nobody is questioning the legality of what qualifies for being able to
legally use the upgrade version of Windows 8 or not. Nor do I see this
as a problem either, unless you built your own machine. Most of us
though purchased our computers with an OEM version of Windows already on
it. And any machine capable of running Windows 8 would likely have XP,
Vista, or Windows 7 previously anyway. So for most of us, legally
upgrading isn't a problem at all.

The problem that we are talking about is that Microsoft had used a
system which we all learned many years ago. That was before you could
upgrade, you had to have either the qualifying OS already installed, or
the install disc handy when it ask you for it. This was true from
Windows 95 to XP (I have no idea what Vista wanted, as I skipped that one).

Although when Windows 7 came out. Having the install disc for a
qualifying upgrade was no longer useable. Meaning that you also could
likely want to upgrade your drive when you upgrade to Windows 7. But you
can't upgrade to Windows 7 if there isn't a qualifying OS already on the
new drive. Pain in the rear just to install the qualifying Windows only
to wipe it out again.

Now Paul and myself have found out that Windows 8 install doesn't care
if it is a brand new drive or not. As it will go ahead and install
anyway. Which is a lot less of a hassle for legal users compared to the
Windows 7 upgrade. And I am sure Microsoft had taken a lot of heat for that.
 
W

...winston

"BillW50" wrote in message
Nobody is questioning the legality of what qualifies for being able to
legally use the upgrade version of Windows 8 or not. Nor do I see this
as a problem either, unless you built your own machine. Most of us
though purchased our computers with an OEM version of Windows already on
it. And any machine capable of running Windows 8 would likely have XP,
Vista, or Windows 7 previously anyway. So for most of us, legally
upgrading isn't a problem at all.

The problem that we are talking about is that Microsoft had used a
system which we all learned many years ago. That was before you could
upgrade, you had to have either the qualifying OS already installed, or
the install disc handy when it ask you for it. This was true from
Windows 95 to XP (I have no idea what Vista wanted, as I skipped that one).

Although when Windows 7 came out. Having the install disc for a
qualifying upgrade was no longer useable. Meaning that you also could
likely want to upgrade your drive when you upgrade to Windows 7. But you
can't upgrade to Windows 7 if there isn't a qualifying OS already on the
new drive. Pain in the rear just to install the qualifying Windows only
to wipe it out again.

Now Paul and myself have found out that Windows 8 install doesn't care
if it is a brand new drive or not. As it will go ahead and install
anyway. Which is a lot less of a hassle for legal users compared to the
Windows 7 upgrade. And I am sure Microsoft had taken a lot of heat for that.The need to insert the prior o/s CD/DVD when not doing an in-place upgrade (running setup.exe from the prior o/s) was the same for
Vista and later o/s.

As noted, what is technically feasible..is not (and has never been) the same as licensing. It's incumbent upon the user to abide by
the license and any included constraints (and obviously activate the software online or via phone).
 
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W

Wolf K

This stuff is pretty simple.

Licensing = one license per pc/device

The ability to install the same o/s (upgrade, full version, ectc.) with
the same key on multiple devices while technically feasible via a
variety of methods does not change or modify the legal aspects of MSFT's
licensing.
Sure, but that's mot what I was referring to. I may have
over-interpreted, but I tho't someone here claimed you couldn't have
more than one OS per device. That's nonsense. It's your hardware, not
theirs. It's your choice on which device to install the OS, not theirs.

Have a good day.
 

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