How do I block whole folders from the Internet?


P

Peter Jason

I have Win7 Sp1

Normally I block Internet access by using the
Firewall:

Control Panel/Windows Firewall/Advanced
Settings/Inbound[orOutbound]/NewRule/Wizard-Program/
This program path etc.

My question is: how can I block ALL the programs
in a particular folder (*.exe) or, for that matter
all the contents of a folder without having to go
thru them one-by-one?

At the moment, I have to enter them all
individually, both for incoming & outgoing; and
it's tedious.

Peter
 
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R

richard

I have Win7 Sp1

Normally I block Internet access by using the
Firewall:

Control Panel/Windows Firewall/Advanced
Settings/Inbound[orOutbound]/NewRule/Wizard-Program/
This program path etc.

My question is: how can I block ALL the programs
in a particular folder (*.exe) or, for that matter
all the contents of a folder without having to go
thru them one-by-one?

At the moment, I have to enter them all
individually, both for incoming & outgoing; and
it's tedious.

Peter
Right click on the folder and select properties.
Select share tab.
Select advanced settings and click.
Untick the share box.
 
S

Sam Hill

Peter said:
I have Win7 Sp1

Normally I block Internet access by using the Firewall:

Control Panel/Windows Firewall/Advanced
Settings/Inbound[orOutbound]/NewRule/Wizard-Program/ This program path
etc.

My question is: how can I block ALL the programs in a particular folder
(*.exe) or, for that matter all the contents of a folder without having
to go thru them one-by-one?

At the moment, I have to enter them all individually, both for incoming
& outgoing; and it's tedious.
How often do you actually have multiple EXEs in the same folder? It seems
to me that would be a rare occurrence as programs tend to use separate
folders and sub-folders all to themselves - which is the prudent way to
construct your drive. Please don't say you actually choose to install
more than one to a folder...
 
R

richard

Peter said:
I have Win7 Sp1

Normally I block Internet access by using the Firewall:

Control Panel/Windows Firewall/Advanced
Settings/Inbound[orOutbound]/NewRule/Wizard-Program/ This program path
etc.

My question is: how can I block ALL the programs in a particular folder
(*.exe) or, for that matter all the contents of a folder without having
to go thru them one-by-one?

At the moment, I have to enter them all individually, both for incoming
& outgoing; and it's tedious.
How often do you actually have multiple EXEs in the same folder? It seems
to me that would be a rare occurrence as programs tend to use separate
folders and sub-folders all to themselves - which is the prudent way to
construct your drive. Please don't say you actually choose to install
more than one to a folder...
I do. I see nothing wrong with that.
When you install the program, the program determines the proper path to
use. If it doesn't, you're screwed.
 
W

...winston

???

That doesn't meet the op's request
'block all the *programs* in a particular folder (*.exe)'

Unsharing a folder doesn't prevent a program's outbound Internet access.

Do you think your Programs Files folder is shared with the Internet ?


--
....winston
msft mvp mail


"richard" wrote in message
My question is: how can I block ALL the programs
in a particular folder (*.exe) or, for that matter
all the contents of a folder without having to go
thru them one-by-one?

At the moment, I have to enter them all
individually, both for incoming & outgoing; and
it's tedious.

Peter
Right click on the folder and select properties.
Select share tab.
Select advanced settings and click.
Untick the share box.
 
E

Evan Platt

Right click on the folder and select properties.
Select share tab.
Select advanced settings and click.
Untick the share box.
bullis, it's best you not try to answer computer related questions.
You're out of your league.
 
P

Paul in Houston TX

Peter said:
I have Win7 Sp1

Normally I block Internet access by using the
Firewall:

Control Panel/Windows Firewall/Advanced
Settings/Inbound[orOutbound]/NewRule/Wizard-Program/
This program path etc.

My question is: how can I block ALL the programs
in a particular folder (*.exe) or, for that matter
all the contents of a folder without having to go
thru them one-by-one?

At the moment, I have to enter them all
individually, both for incoming & outgoing; and
it's tedious.

Peter
You would also want to block com, msi, and scr.
I use zone alarm and it easily does what you want.
Windows default firewall I don;t know.
 
Y

Yousuf Khan

I have Win7 Sp1

Normally I block Internet access by using the
Firewall:

Control Panel/Windows Firewall/Advanced
Settings/Inbound[orOutbound]/NewRule/Wizard-Program/
This program path etc.

My question is: how can I block ALL the programs
in a particular folder (*.exe) or, for that matter
all the contents of a folder without having to go
thru them one-by-one?

At the moment, I have to enter them all
individually, both for incoming& outgoing; and
it's tedious.

Peter
Most of the time, shared folders won't get shared onto the Internet
anyways, the firewall rules will prevent them from being shared to
outside addresses. Are you really talking about preventing them from
being shared onto the "Internet" or are you really talking about
preventing sharing on your LAN?

Yousuf Khan
 
S

Sam Hill

richard said:
Peter said:
I have Win7 Sp1

Normally I block Internet access by using the Firewall:

Control Panel/Windows Firewall/Advanced
Settings/Inbound[orOutbound]/NewRule/Wizard-Program/ This program path
etc.

My question is: how can I block ALL the programs in a particular
folder (*.exe) or, for that matter all the contents of a folder
without having to go thru them one-by-one?

At the moment, I have to enter them all individually, both for
incoming & outgoing; and it's tedious.
How often do you actually have multiple EXEs in the same folder? It
seems to me that would be a rare occurrence as programs tend to use
separate folders and sub-folders all to themselves - which is the
prudent way to construct your drive. Please don't say you actually
choose to install more than one to a folder...
I do. I see nothing wrong with that.
When you install the program, the program determines the proper path to
use. If it doesn't, you're screwed.
You seem to be confused. "The program determines the proper path" -
exactly. How many of your installed-by-you programs have chosen the same
path/directory as a previously installed program? Or even those /not/
installed by you?

If you do install programs in the same folder, you create the chance for
same-named files to overwrite previous files and screw up the
installation of the previous one. So, yes, if /you/ choose same-path,
you /are/ screwed.
 
R

richard

richard said:
Peter Jason wrote:
I have Win7 Sp1

Normally I block Internet access by using the Firewall:

Control Panel/Windows Firewall/Advanced
Settings/Inbound[orOutbound]/NewRule/Wizard-Program/ This program path
etc.

My question is: how can I block ALL the programs in a particular
folder (*.exe) or, for that matter all the contents of a folder
without having to go thru them one-by-one?

At the moment, I have to enter them all individually, both for
incoming & outgoing; and it's tedious.

How often do you actually have multiple EXEs in the same folder? It
seems to me that would be a rare occurrence as programs tend to use
separate folders and sub-folders all to themselves - which is the
prudent way to construct your drive. Please don't say you actually
choose to install more than one to a folder...
I do. I see nothing wrong with that.
When you install the program, the program determines the proper path to
use. If it doesn't, you're screwed.
You seem to be confused. "The program determines the proper path" -
exactly. How many of your installed-by-you programs have chosen the same
path/directory as a previously installed program? Or even those /not/
installed by you?

If you do install programs in the same folder, you create the chance for
same-named files to overwrite previous files and screw up the
installation of the previous one. So, yes, if /you/ choose same-path,
you /are/ screwed.
Which is one of the reasons better programs will create a folder named for
their product. And if that's a problem, just reinstall the program in a
different folder name.
 
P

Peter Jason

Peter said:
I have Win7 Sp1

Normally I block Internet access by using the
Firewall:

Control Panel/Windows Firewall/Advanced
Settings/Inbound[orOutbound]/NewRule/Wizard-Program/
This program path etc.

My question is: how can I block ALL the programs
in a particular folder (*.exe) or, for that matter
all the contents of a folder without having to go
thru them one-by-one?

At the moment, I have to enter them all
individually, both for incoming & outgoing; and
it's tedious.

Peter
You would also want to block com, msi, and scr.
I use zone alarm and it easily does what you want.
Windows default firewall I don;t know.
Thanks, I use only the Windows Security Essentials
now. I'll check to see if has this capability
too.
 
P

Peter Jason

I have Win7 Sp1

Normally I block Internet access by using the
Firewall:

Control Panel/Windows Firewall/Advanced
Settings/Inbound[orOutbound]/NewRule/Wizard-Program/
This program path etc.

My question is: how can I block ALL the programs
in a particular folder (*.exe) or, for that matter
all the contents of a folder without having to go
thru them one-by-one?

At the moment, I have to enter them all
individually, both for incoming& outgoing; and
it's tedious.

Peter
Most of the time, shared folders won't get shared onto the Internet
anyways, the firewall rules will prevent them from being shared to
outside addresses. Are you really talking about preventing them from
being shared onto the "Internet" or are you really talking about
preventing sharing on your LAN?

Yousuf Khan
I have only a single computer. I want to stop
software vendors sending me emails and upgrade
notices. I assume they my can read one's program
folders at will and I want to lock them out.
 
B

Big Steel

I have Win7 Sp1

Normally I block Internet access by using the
Firewall:

Control Panel/Windows Firewall/Advanced
Settings/Inbound[orOutbound]/NewRule/Wizard-Program/
This program path etc.

My question is: how can I block ALL the programs
in a particular folder (*.exe) or, for that matter
all the contents of a folder without having to go
thru them one-by-one?

At the moment, I have to enter them all
individually, both for incoming& outgoing; and
it's tedious.

Peter
If it was me, then I would go to the NTFS security on the folder and
remove permissions for all user accounts but mine, and that would block
access to the folder. You could do the same thing by deleting all user
accounts off of the folder but your account and block that way too.
 
W

Wolf K

I have only a single computer. I want to stop
software vendors sending me emails and upgrade
notices. I assume they my can read one's program
folders at will and I want to lock them out.
No, the vendors don't read your folders at will. When you buy software,
you may have to uncheck a box for "Send me updates..." or whatever. If
you don't, you've given permission to send you e-mails.

Simpler solutions for stopping e-mails:
a) use the Unsubscribe thingy at the bottom of the e-mails; or
b) use filters to send the spam to trash. If your e-mail provider has a
web-mail portal, go there to set the filters, then the e-mails you don't
want won't show up on your computer.

Upgrade notices:
These notices are not sent to you. They are triggered by "update
demons", which start when you start the computer. The update demons not
only pop-up the notices you don't like, they also slow down your
computer. There are several utilities that include tools for cleaning up
the start-up list. I use cCleaner, which also does a nice job of
cleaning temporary files, etc. Free, too.

HTH,
Wolf K.
 
G

Gene E. Bloch

Peter said:
I have Win7 Sp1

Normally I block Internet access by using the Firewall:

Control Panel/Windows Firewall/Advanced
Settings/Inbound[orOutbound]/NewRule/Wizard-Program/ This program path
etc.

My question is: how can I block ALL the programs in a particular folder
(*.exe) or, for that matter all the contents of a folder without having
to go thru them one-by-one?

At the moment, I have to enter them all individually, both for incoming
& outgoing; and it's tedious.
How often do you actually have multiple EXEs in the same folder? It seems
to me that would be a rare occurrence as programs tend to use separate
folders and sub-folders all to themselves - which is the prudent way to
construct your drive. Please don't say you actually choose to install
more than one to a folder...
Many programs have more than one exe in the installation directory.

Take a look at
C:\Program Files\Java\jre7\bin

for an obvious example.
 
P

Paul

Wolf said:
Upgrade notices:
These notices are not sent to you. They are triggered by "update
demons", which start when you start the computer. The update demons not
only pop-up the notices you don't like, they also slow down your
computer. There are several utilities that include tools for cleaning up
the start-up list. I use cCleaner, which also does a nice job of
cleaning temporary files, etc. Free, too.

HTH,
Wolf K.
Another way to do that, is with a copy of Autoruns.exe .

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/sysinternals/bb963902

Right now, on this computer, I can see two entries that
allow Adobe Flash to query the adobe server. And that would also
give them a way to put a popup on the screen (using their own code).
Autoruns uses tick boxes, so you can enable and disable things,
and then re-test.

What I can't find right now, is the method that Adobe Reader uses
to check for updates, but perhaps that one runs, when I actually
run Adobe Reader itself.

On my laptop, the AV software helps itself to the LAN connection,
and does an update check, practically as soon as the OS is running.
But I won't be disabling that.

Paul
 
P

Peter Jason

Another way to do that, is with a copy of Autoruns.exe .

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/sysinternals/bb963902

Right now, on this computer, I can see two entries that
allow Adobe Flash to query the adobe server. And that would also
give them a way to put a popup on the screen (using their own code).
Autoruns uses tick boxes, so you can enable and disable things,
and then re-test.

What I can't find right now, is the method that Adobe Reader uses
to check for updates, but perhaps that one runs, when I actually
run Adobe Reader itself.

On my laptop, the AV software helps itself to the LAN connection,
and does an update check, practically as soon as the OS is running.
But I won't be disabling that.

Paul
Even today there is new angst. I keep getting an
unsolicited email from
"Broadband-IPTV Asia Event Team" even though I've
Junk Mailed it with every possible rule. It
just keeps popping up. How do they do this?
 
P

Paul

Peter said:
Even today there is new angst. I keep getting an
unsolicited email from
"Broadband-IPTV Asia Event Team" even though I've
Junk Mailed it with every possible rule. It
just keeps popping up. How do they do this?
Maybe your rule construction is too precise ?

Perhaps the character set used, is throwing off the match.

Paul
 
C

Char Jackson

Even today there is new angst. I keep getting an
unsolicited email from
"Broadband-IPTV Asia Event Team" even though I've
Junk Mailed it with every possible rule. It
just keeps popping up. How do they do this?
Your rule definition is ineffective, probably because something is
changing with each email and/or your rule is too specific.

Look at a few of the emails and see what they have in common. Adjust
your rule as necessary. Don't fall into the trap of creating a new
rule for every one of those emails. Don't use the "This is junk mail"
routine. Instead, create a new rule from scratch and make it general
enough that it catches all of them. If you're concerned that your rule
will become too general, you can have it move matching emails to a
temp folder where they can be inspected for false positives. Once
you're comfortable, edit the rule to delete the offending emails
directly.
 
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G

Gene Wirchenko

On Sun, 6 May 2012 04:07:42 +0000 (UTC), Sam Hill wrote:
[snip]
How often do you actually have multiple EXEs in the same folder? It seems
Quite often.

Some apps have more than one .exe.

One can copy to a folder.
Many programs have more than one exe in the installation directory.

Take a look at
C:\Program Files\Java\jre7\bin

for an obvious example.
Or c:\windows

Sincerely,

Gene Wirchenko
 

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