FTP-ing


O

OldGuy

I have an FTP client that can access files on remote FTP servers.

How would I set up my Win 7 Pro PC (or XP Pro PC) to act as a server on
my local LAN?

TIA
 
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P

Paul

OldGuy said:
I have an FTP client that can access files on remote FTP servers.

How would I set up my Win 7 Pro PC (or XP Pro PC) to act as a server on
my local LAN?

TIA
"Turn Windows Features On and Off"

That's where you'd check to see if your level of Windows, supports IIS,
and whether they even still have IIS or not.

http://www.bleepstatic.com/tutorials/uninstall-windows-programs/win7-8-programs-and-features.jpg

Look for the IIS feature. It should be a web server
plus an FTP server.

http://www.eightforums.com/attachme...098822-cant-install-net-framework-3-5-net.png

Shows a separate tick box for FTP here. Only enable
as much of the solution, as you need.

http://windowsitpro.com/site-files/...ntent/content/103502/103502win7ftpinstall.jpg

Eventually, the real fun begins. There should be some
kind of IIS control panel. It can have three main entries.
For example, this one *doesn't* have the FTP in it, and maybe
it was turned off or not installed.

http://www.techfuels.com/attachment...-installing-iis-windows-xp-professional-3.jpg

You get to define a directory to use for serving FTP files.
Like maybe the directory by default is named "inetpub\ftproot".

But the nasty part, is getting passwords to work, and actually
making your first FTP connection. Good luck with that. I've
set this up a couple times in the past, and it always causes
hair loss, until you see your first successful connection.

Don't port forward your router, to the FTP server on that PC.
While plaintext username and password, may be fine for short
periods of time on a home LAN, running a server like that
and accessing it from McDonalds Wifi is not recommended.
If an FTP server is detected on a well-known port, kiddies
will bash on it, until they get in.

There are other protocols for securing FTP a little better.
Same goes for Telnet. On Linux, they make it hard on purpose,
to run vanilla protocols. On MacOSX, it's dead simple - a couple
tick boxes and you're up and running. That's one thing I liked
about my Mac, is if I couldn't get some flavor of file
sharing working, I could just tick that box and away we go.
Do my FTP client, from the Windows end.

It may be considered "computing negligence" to run unprotected
Telnet and FTP (plaintext username and password), but there are
still times where it is a quite practical solution. (I'm sick
of carrying a portable storage device with an encryption key
on it, around the room. That's what some schemes end up making
you do.) Another solution I use on some boxes, is an old
fashioned serial port connection, for times when the GUI or
the network screws up, and I need a way to get to the
console and fix it. Or prove or disprove whether the computer
is actually frozen or not (i.e. still get a response on a serial
port, when the keyboard and mouse are dead, and the screen is
black). "The old ways are the best"... :)

Good luck (with the password setup...)

Paul
 
P

(PeteCresswell)

Per OldGuy:
How would I set up my Win 7 Pro PC (or XP Pro PC) to act as a server on
my local LAN?
I run XP Pro and used the freebie version of "Serv-U".

Even I was able to set it up and get it running as needed - and
that definitely says something about the product's simplicity/ease of
use..... -)
 
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Fokke Nauta

I have an FTP client that can access files on remote FTP servers.

How would I set up my Win 7 Pro PC (or XP Pro PC) to act as a server on
my local LAN?

TIA
You can simply set up a FTP server with Filezilla. I use a XP machine as
a file-, web- and FTP server. Filezilla works great.

Fokke Nauta
 

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