Free up the vista partition space


M

Mervyn Thomas

Having upgraded from Vista to W7 I now have 2 partitions and neither OS will
allow me to delete or format the vista partition. I am running a bit short
on space so how do I get rid of the vista partition - Can I simply just
delete the files on this partition? I don't want vista ever again!
Mervyn
 
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G

Gordon

Mervyn Thomas said:
Having upgraded from Vista to W7 I now have 2 partitions and neither OS
will
allow me to delete or format the vista partition. I am running a bit
short on space so how do I get rid of the vista partition - Can I simply
just delete the files on this partition? I don't want vista ever again!
Mervyn
In Windows 7 open Disk Management as Administrator and remove the partition
there.
However, you may then have to do a start-up repair from your Windows 7
DVD...
 
M

Mervyn Thomas

Hi - now in panic mode! I used the partition manager download and opted to
wipe the partiion holding the vista OS. Now when I boot I get a nice
message "missing operating system" I have tried to boot off of the
Microsoft DVD but nothing happens!
 
C

Canuck57

Mervyn said:
Hi - now in panic mode! I used the partition manager download and opted to
wipe the partiion holding the vista OS. Now when I boot I get a nice
message "missing operating system" I have tried to boot off of the
Microsoft DVD but nothing happens!
You blew away Vista.

Start witht he recovery disks. If you need more disk space, add a new
disk. A good time is right now before your restor/recover it.

If you didn't make a backup copy or create a set of disks, call the
manufacturer, they can provide one for a fee.
 
M

Mr doe

Canuck57 said:
You blew away Vista.

Start witht he recovery disks. If you need more disk space, add a new
disk. A good time is right now before your restor/recover it.

If you didn't make a backup copy or create a set of disks, call the
manufacturer, they can provide one for a fee.
Try FDISK make the pertition you Want THE ACTIVE PARTITION ... or
use the Drive manufatures utility to Set up A new drive ... DO NOT ERASE
the partition ,, But Make it The Active partition .

I am Replying to A post That Cut off the original post .So I do not know
all of The original posters Facts .
 
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I

Ian D

Mervyn Thomas said:
Hi - now in panic mode! I used the partition manager download and opted
to wipe the partiion holding the vista OS. Now when I boot I get a nice
message "missing operating system" I have tried to boot off of the
Microsoft DVD but nothing happens!


news:[email protected]
If Vista was on the first partition, with Win 7 on the second
partition, the boot files would be on the Vista partition. If
you wiped that partition, Vista, and the Win 7 boot files are
gone. Use the Win 7 DVD to repair the Win 7 boot. To boot
from the DVD, make sure the DVD drive is the first item in
the BIOS boot order.
 
M

Mervyn Thomas

The Win7 disk does not appear to be bootable even when first in the boot
order and I seem to remember that as this is the "Upgrade Win7 " it relies
on having an OS system there already! I have an Acronis Boot Disk that was
prepared on an XP machine. Is there any way I can use this to get in and
add somehow the boot instructions?
Mervyn
 
D

Dave-UK

Mervyn Thomas said:
The Win7 disk does not appear to be bootable even when first in the boot order and I seem to
remember that as this is the "Upgrade Win7 " it relies on having an OS system there already! I
have an Acronis Boot Disk that was prepared on an XP machine. Is there any way I can use this to
get in and add somehow the boot instructions?
Mervyn
Here are my Win7 repair disks:

Win7 Repair Disk 32bit
http://www.megaupload.com/?d=NE3F3YVO
Win7 Repair Disk 64bit
http://www.megaupload.com/?d=G6R5LA2L

Download your version, extract the zipped iso,
burn to a cd as an image and then boot the cd.
Select your keyboard and try the Start-up repair option.
 
I

Ian D

Mervyn Thomas said:
The Win7 disk does not appear to be bootable even when first in the boot
order and I seem to remember that as this is the "Upgrade Win7 " it relies
on having an OS system there already! I have an Acronis Boot Disk that
was prepared on an XP machine. Is there any way I can use this to get in
and add somehow the boot instructions?
Mervyn
news:[email protected]
That's odd. A Win 7 retail upgrade disk should be bootable. In
fact, it can be used to install Win 7 on a system with no OS, using
the double install method.
 
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R

R. C. White

Hi, Mervyn.

The Windows startup procedure is quite simple - but it confuses many users.

Boot-up ALWAYS starts in the SYSTEM PARTITION. From there, it branches to
the BOOT VOLUME - wherever that may be.

That's it!

The confusion comes in the many meanings of simple English words. :>( The
computer BOOTS from the SYSTEM partition and keeps its operating SYSTEM
files in the BOOT Volume.

For definitions of these terms, see KB 314470:
Definitions for system volume and boot volume
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/314470/EN-US/

In the typical system, the first partition on the first HDD serves as BOTH
the System Partition and the Boot Volume for the only Windows installation.
That's what you probably had before installing Win7. When you installed
Win7, you created a new second partition to serve as the Boot Volume for
Win7, but it continued to use the first partition as the System Partition.
(Vista probably calls that second partition Drive D:; Win7 may or may not
agree.) Setup updated the startup files on that first partition to give you
the option of booting Vista or Win7. When you used the downloaded
third-party "partition manager" to wipe that first partition, it also wiped
out those critical startup files.

NO operating system will obey an order to delete its own Boot Volume or boot
folder (\Windows) or the System Partition. That's like ordering it to
commit suicide or saw off the limb that it's sitting on, and it won't obey.
That's why you had to use a separate "partition manager" to do the job
without booting into Windows at all.

But Vista will happily delete Win7's boot folder - and vice versa. So the
simplest way for you to delete Vista would have been to boot into Win7 and
delete X:\Windows (with X: denoting the letter that Win7 uses for the System
Partition - see the next paragraphs). This would remove all the Vista
operating system files, while leaving the startup files intact on the System
Partition.

If you installed Win7 by booting from the Win7 DVD-ROM, it would have
assigned C: to its own Boot Volume - the new second partition - and would
refer to the first partition as D:, but Vista would still call that first
partition C:. So you could now boot into Win7 (on your new Drive C:) and
delete D:\Windows to remove Vista but leave the startup files on D: intact.

But if you installed Win7 by booting into Vista and running Win7 Setup from
the Vista desktop, it would have used the same letters that Vista had
assigned; Win7 would see Vista in C:\Windows and Win7 in D:\Windows. So now
you could boot into Win7 on D: and delete C:\Windows to remove Vista without
disturbing the startup files.

To see what letters your current OS has installed, use Disk Management
(diskmgmt.msc). And look in the Status column to see which volumes have the
System and Boot labels.

Like I said: Simple - but confusing. :^}

RC
--
R. C. White, CPA
San Marcos, TX
(e-mail address removed)
Microsoft Windows MVP
Windows Live Mail 2009 (14.0.8089.0726) in Win7 Ultimate x64
 
M

Mervyn Thomas

Panic Over! I have taken the easy option of installing XP and then
"upgraded" to Win7 as my DVD would not boot. This time the boot record
appears to be in D: together with Win7. I say appears because I cannot see
any mention of it in C: which now contains the much smaller XP installation
and plenty of spare space.

So I am back to - how can I make sure the boot record is in D: and to
get rid of the XP in C: as I am technically not allowed to have this copy.

What I really would like to do when all is over is to take a disk image of
D: with the assurance that I can restore my system completely if I get
another total failure. I want C: to be totally for user files backed up
seperately!

Again thanks for everyone who is helping.
 
R

R. C. White

Hi, again, Mervyn.

You mean that I wasted all the time I spent typing that yesterday? You just
ignored it all? :>(

Go back and read at least some of it. Especially those paragraphs near the
end that start:
You didn't tell us which method you used, so we don't know which letter
refers to which partition.

That final paragraph might be the most important
Please do that - in Win7 AND in Vista - and then post back and tell us:
In Vista, which volume has the System label, and which has the Boot label?
In Win7, which volume has the System label, and which has the Boot label?

What is the NAME and the LETTER of each of those volumes?

I THINK all you have to do is boot into Win7 and Delete C:\Windows - but I
can't be sure because I don't know the answers to those questions. But -
Win7 will not delete its OWN boot folder, so the worse that can happen is an
error message refusing to do that. In which case, all you have to do is
delete C:\Windows. But you should understand WHY this is true.

RC
--
R. C. White, CPA
San Marcos, TX
(e-mail address removed)
Microsoft Windows MVP
Windows Live Mail 2009 (14.0.8089.0726) in Win7 Ultimate x64
 
M

Mervyn Thomas

RC - sorry to have offended you - I did read your post very carefully but I
am still hesitant at taking further action because last time I lost
everything!
So this time I booted from the Win7 into the D Drive and according to the
Win7 computer management the Boot is in D. The XP installation remains in
C. Both C and D are called primary partitions and also part of my confusion
is that there is apparently another small partition without any drive letter
called "OEM partition" which seems to only give me a nice "Acer" picture
before getting to windows.

Are you saying I can format this C: partition with the status as described
or should I just delete the files? I guess I still don't completely
understand whether the MBR are files which can be seen in explorer or are
hidden sectors on one of the partitions?
Mervyn
 
R

R. C. White

Hi, Mervyn.
RC - sorry to have offended you
No offense taken. I'm just trying to be sure whether (a) I explained
something wrongly, or (b) my explanation was not understood. Now it sounds
like there was a little of both. It would be much easier if I could
actually watch over your shoulder and see what's on your screen. ;^}
there is apparently another small partition without any drive letter
called "OEM partition" which seems to only give me a nice "Acer" picture
before getting to windows.
Aha! And does THAT unlettered partition have the "System" label in Disk
Management?

I don't recall that you've mentioned that partition before in this thread.
I've never had an Acer or any other brand-name computer since about 1989. I
buy the motherboard, CPU and other components and assemble the system
myself. Many newsgroup messages from users of HP, Dell and other systems
have mentioned such a hidden partition, often called a "recovery partition",
but I've never dealt with one myself so I often forget about it until
reminded.

If the Acer partition is your System Partition, then THAT is where bootmgr
and the hidden \Boot folder should be. Changes here affect your boot-up
process. Changes to files in other partitions will have no effect. Only
those in the System Partition matter.

To repeat myself:

Boot-up ALWAYS starts in the SYSTEM PARTITION. From there, it branches to
the BOOT VOLUME - wherever that may be.

Please run Disk Management again in Win7. In the Graphical View, please
note ALL the partitions on Disk 0, and ALL the partitions on Disk 1. Note
the "drive" letters AND the NAMES that you've assigned to each of them, as
well as the size of each. And, most important, see which has the System
status in the Volume Listing above?
Win7 computer management the Boot is in D. The XP installation remains
in C.
Based on this, it appears that ALL you have to do to free up space on your
Drive C: (first partition on your first hard disk) is to delete C:\Windows,
WinXP's Boot Folder. Which is what I said in my latest post:
I THINK all you have to do is boot into Win7 and Delete C:\Windows
Let us know how this works out for you.

RC
--
R. C. White, CPA
San Marcos, TX
(e-mail address removed)
Microsoft Windows MVP
Windows Live Mail 2009 (14.0.8089.0726) in Win7 Ultimate x64
 
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M

Mervyn Thomas

The full description in disk manager for disk 0 is:
No Letter - 7.81 GB Healthy (OEM partition )
C: 33.36 GB NTFS Healthy (system, Active, Primary Partition) Has XP
system
D: 33.35 GB NTFS Healthy ( Boot, Page File Crash Dump Primary Partition)
Has Win7 system

The D partition has got a Boot folder in it the C: does not. I can not get
into the OEM partition at all as it does not show up on "Computer"

So do you confirm I can empty C: which I think I would prefer to do by
deleteing files rather than risk a more powerful approach?
Mervyn
 
O

OSIRIS

Hi, Mervyn.



Aha! And does THAT unlettered partition have the "System" label in Disk
Management?
Hi R. C. and Mervyn
The small partition is an Acer recovery partition. Acer does not
provide "recovery" disks as they used to. Instead there's a custom
partition (usually labeled "PQSERVICE") that's a HPFS rather than NTFS
format and should be HIDDEN. It contains the custom Windows install
files. Pressing ALT-F10 during startup launches a re-install routine
from that hidden patition. Obviously, it should not be messed with.

It is NOT the System partition and is only ever accessed after
pressing ALT-F10.
 
R

R. C. White

Hi, Mervyn.

OK! Now we're getting somewhere. We FINALLY know which is the System
Partition! ;<)
The D partition has got a Boot folder in it the C: does not.
You still haven't told us the NAMES of those partitions. You probably
haven't named them, which is why you are still using - and being confused
by - drive LETTERS.

If you could reboot into WinXP, you would see that its partition (Drive C:?
The letter might change, but it would still be the second partition, the one
after the no-letter partition.) would then have the Boot label - that status
is for whichever partition has the OS that is CURRENTLY RUNNING, And Drive
C: would still have the System status, because that doesn't depend on which
OS is running.
So do you confirm I can empty C: which I think I would prefer to do by
deleteing files rather than risk a more powerful approach?
YES! Well, don't "empty" C:, because that will wipe out the hidden, system
file "bootmgr" and \Boot folder - and without those, you won't be able to
boot anything.

DELETE C:\WINDOWS!!!

That won't wipe out those hidden files, or any of your data files or program
files in C:\Program Files. But it will delete your entire WinXP Boot Folder
tree, which is C:\Windows and all its subfolders and the files in them -
probably a gigabyte or more of them. My latest WinXP's \Windows folder has
nearly 2 GB in almost 12,000 files and 2,000 folders. (If you don't show
much more free space on C: after this, you might need to empty the Recycle
Bin.)

Then post back and tell us what happened.

RC
--
R. C. White, CPA
San Marcos, TX
(e-mail address removed)
Microsoft Windows MVP
Windows Live Mail 2009 (14.0.8089.0726) in Win7 Ultimate x64
 
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R

R. C. White

Hi, OSIRIS.

Thanks for that information. It confirms what I thought I understood after
Mervyn's latest post, in which he told us that the first partition AFTER the
unlettered partition has the System status.

RC
--
R. C. White, CPA
San Marcos, TX
(e-mail address removed)
Microsoft Windows MVP
Windows Live Mail 2009 (14.0.8089.0726) in Win7 Ultimate x64
 

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