Folder Opening Very Slowly


O

OREALLY

Hi,

I have a folder with many downloaded applications...about 4 GBs. This
'downloads' folder takes over a minute to open. Other much larger folders
containing 20 GB or so of music files...wav etc, or, my Movies folder
containing many MPEG files, open right up. Is there something about
applications that makes this folder so slow to open?

Thanks,

Oreally
 
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D

Dave

Hi,

I have a folder with many downloaded applications...about 4 GBs. This
'downloads' folder takes over a minute to open. Other much larger
folders containing 20 GB or so of music files...wav etc, or, my Movies
folder containing many MPEG files, open right up. Is there something
about applications that makes this folder so slow to open?

Thanks,

Oreally
I've seen this when the directory contains a bunch of zip or .exe
compressed files. It seems to treat then as folders. It only seems to be a
problem on first open.
 
O

OREALLY

right...but after reboot it becomes slow again!



"Dave" wrote in message
Hi,

I have a folder with many downloaded applications...about 4 GBs. This
'downloads' folder takes over a minute to open. Other much larger
folders containing 20 GB or so of music files...wav etc, or, my Movies
folder containing many MPEG files, open right up. Is there something
about applications that makes this folder so slow to open?

Thanks,

Oreally
I've seen this when the directory contains a bunch of zip or .exe
compressed files. It seems to treat then as folders. It only seems to be a
problem on first open.
 
J

Jason

right...but after reboot it becomes slow again!



"Dave" wrote in message


I've seen this when the directory contains a bunch of zip or .exe
compressed files. It seems to treat then as folders. It only seems to be a
problem on first open.
How many files are there? 4GB of apps could be hundreds of thousands, in
which case, sorting the list can take quite some time. I have some
folders with 5-10 thousand files and they take a while.
Once the folder is open, you can probably test this hypothesis by
clicking on one of the column headings to force it re-sort everything and
see how long it takes.


Jason
 
G

gufus

I have a folder with many downloaded applications...about 4 GBs. This
'downloads' folder takes over a minute to open.
Try turning off HDD indexing.
 
P

Paul

gufus said:
Try turning off HDD indexing.
Wouldn't it be the exact opposite ?

Maybe the system becomes "curious" about ZIP files if they aren't indexed.
If a file is indexed, and the indexer can tell via the modification date
that nothing is changed, then it shouldn't have to look inside. (Only
an AV tool might be curious about content.)

On my Win7 laptop, indexing was not set up by default, and
I turned it on myself, and redefined what to index. I also
removed the backoff feature, so when it wants to index, the
indexing runs "full tilt" (won't pause on user input). To index my
relatively empty laptop from scratch takes three hours... because the
stupid thing won't pay attention to the setting that says *not* to
index file content (for keyword searches). If I notice it indexing
from scratch (the index has been reset), I walk away and come back
in three hours.

If ZIPs are a problem, and the file name are descriptive enough to
put them back later, maybe they can simply be moved to another
partition. If they're an actual part of some install, then you have
to leave them. But if they just contain a copy of the package to
install, you could store them elsewhere.

If a ZIP is big enough, it can actually cause problems for some tools.
For example, if you download the source tarball for Firefox or
Seamonkey or Thunderbird, there are so many files inside, some
AV scanners will die while attempting to scan them. That's not
supposed to happen. I now move tarballs over to my "junk storage area"
to keep them out of trouble and off the system disk.

Paul
 
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G

gufus

Wouldn't it be the exact opposite ?
Would it? (I don't know)
On my Win7 laptop, indexing was not set up by default, and
I turned it on myself, and redefined what to index.
How do you choose what to index?
 
P

Paul

gufus said:
Would it? (I don't know)


How do you choose what to index?
There's a "Modify" button in the control panel. My guess is (haven't
done this in a while), if you change the areas to index, it'll index
the whole thing over again.

http://www.sevenforums.com/tutorials/194374-indexer-backoff-enable-disable-windows-7-a.html

(I disable the backoff, because the laptop is a low performer in the
CPU department, and if it wants to index, I just walk away and let if
finish. Having that process running in the background is too annoying.
The control panel tells you how much it has done, and I know the
readout says around 143,000 files when finished, so I know how
much remains to be done.)

Actually, the interface is pure misery, in terms of getting the
indexed areas to read out correctly. Basically, I wanted *everything*
indexed, because I don't want anything hidden from an attempt
to search for it. (My laptop doesn't have email on it, so I
didn't have to worry about excluding email folders or databases.)

When you try to change something in the Indexer setup, it likes to add
its own entries along with your changes. So it'll take a while to
get things exactly as you want them.

http://www.sevenforums.com/performance-maintenance/145712-cant-modify-indexing-options.html

"I went control panel | Indexing Options"

HTH,
Paul
 
P

Paul

gufus said:
Would it? (I don't know)
Another possibility, is maybe the activity is related to making
thumbnails ? Like, on multimedia folders.

*******

I generally try to turn off that "automation" stuff if it gets
in my way. Me turning on indexing, is an abrupt change in
direction, as normally I'd turn stuff like that off. But searches
were taking so long in Windows 7, I had to turn it on.

I just wish the indexer actually listened to your instructions.
I don't really want file content search capability. I want to
do a content search on a specific folder (like, search just the
Firefox source folder, when I'm looking at C source files). And
I prefer to do that, the moment I'm actually doing the search.
But when I told the Windows 7 Indexer to ignore content, it indexed
content anyway. And that's why it takes three hours, instead of
five minutes.

Properly designed, an indexer should not be a pain in the ass.

Paul
 
F

fritz

Maybe the system becomes "curious" about ZIP files if they aren't indexed.
Maybe not, gets my vote.

The first thing I do is disable indexing*. My systems have never been
"curious" about .zip or any other kind of file.



* - Ok, it's the fourth thing. Disable UAC, disable system restore
and disable hibernate come ahead of indexing.
 
O

OREALLY

what's UAC?



"fritz" wrote in message

Maybe the system becomes "curious" about ZIP files if they aren't indexed.
Maybe not, gets my vote.

The first thing I do is disable indexing*. My systems have never been
"curious" about .zip or any other kind of file.



* - Ok, it's the fourth thing. Disable UAC, disable system restore
and disable hibernate come ahead of indexing.
 
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O

OREALLY

About 150

"Jason" wrote in message

right...but after reboot it becomes slow again!



"Dave" wrote in message


I've seen this when the directory contains a bunch of zip or .exe
compressed files. It seems to treat then as folders. It only seems to be a
problem on first open.
How many files are there? 4GB of apps could be hundreds of thousands, in
which case, sorting the list can take quite some time. I have some
folders with 5-10 thousand files and they take a while.
Once the folder is open, you can probably test this hypothesis by
clicking on one of the column headings to force it re-sort everything and
see how long it takes.


Jason
 
G

gufus

Properly designed, an indexer should not be a pain in the ass.
Ah..

I turned off indexing altogether. (I'll see if it makes a difference)
 
F

fritz

How many files are there? 4GB of apps could be hundreds of thousands, in
which case, sorting the list can take quite some time. I have some
folders with 5-10 thousand files and they take a while.
Ok, I set up a folder with 20,544 files, 9 GB (or maybe GiB, didn't
check). Opens instantly.

Once the folder is open, you can probably test this hypothesis by
clicking on one of the column headings to force it re-sort everything and
see how long it takes.
Resorted those 20K+ files several different ways - all sorts were
instantly.

This was done on a regular HD, not a SSD.

If 5-10K files take a while, you need a new(er) computer.


It did take 4 seconds to delete them and 45 seconds to purge from the
MFT.
 
S

Sjouke Burry

Hi,

I have a folder with many downloaded applications...about 4 GBs. This
'downloads' folder takes over a minute to open. Other much larger
folders containing 20 GB or so of music files...wav etc, or, my Movies
folder containing many MPEG files, open right up. Is there something
about applications that makes this folder so slow to open?

Thanks,

Oreally
Extreme fragmentation???
 
C

Char Jackson

I generally try to turn off that "automation" stuff if it gets
in my way. Me turning on indexing, is an abrupt change in
direction, as normally I'd turn stuff like that off. But searches
were taking so long in Windows 7, I had to turn it on.

I just wish the indexer actually listened to your instructions.
I don't really want file content search capability. I want to
do a content search on a specific folder (like, search just the
Firefox source folder, when I'm looking at C source files). And
I prefer to do that, the moment I'm actually doing the search.
But when I told the Windows 7 Indexer to ignore content, it indexed
content anyway. And that's why it takes three hours, instead of
five minutes.

Properly designed, an indexer should not be a pain in the ass.
Have you taken a look at Everything Search from www.voidtools.com ?

On my several-year-old system with a few hundred thousand files,
initially building the index takes less than 30 seconds and the actual
search process takes zero seconds. A search tool like this should have
been built into Windows.
 
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R

Roy Smith

what's UAC?
User Account Control, here's Microsoft's description:

User Account Control (UAC) is a feature in Windows that can help prevent
unauthorized changes to your computer. UAC does this by asking you for
permission or an administrator‌ password before performing actions that
could potentially affect your computer's operation or that change
settings that affect other users. When you see a UAC message, read it
carefully, and then make sure the name of the action or program that's
about to start is one that you intended to start.
"fritz" wrote in message



Maybe not, gets my vote.

The first thing I do is disable indexing*. My systems have never been
"curious" about .zip or any other kind of file.



* - Ok, it's the fourth thing. Disable UAC, disable system restore
and disable hibernate come ahead of indexing.

--

Roy Smith
Windows 8 64-Bit
Thunderbird 17.0
Thursday, January 3, 2013 8:06:35 PM
 

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