Fax and Scan problems on Win 7


P

Paul

Loonie said:
A few weeks ago I had no problems with the Fax and Scan out to about 50
miles, in Ireland.

Now I want to fax to USA and am having problems. I had no problems
loading the files and images into Fax and Scan but the phone number
system seems to be a mess. I want to send a fax to 001 636-349-xxxx but
the Fax and Scan prog keeps telling me that I have to install a printer
"This machine is not connected to the Fax Printer on the selected Fax
Server." Why should I have a Fax Server? I do have a Zoom Fax modem.

Could it be that the internet modem is interfering? I had no faxing
problems a few weeks ago when faxing locally and the internet modem is
in the same state.

TIA
I'm in North America, and our phone system here uses ten digits for
long distance. That's the basic identifier. 636-349-xxxx

Now, if I want to "direct dial" the number, without operator assistance,
I put a "1" in front. So if I pick up the phone, and try
to reach that FAX machine, it would be 1-636-349-xxxx. I would
only be charged for connect time in minutes.

If I phone the operator, and ask him/her/it to dial 636-349-xxxx for
me, there would likely be some kind of charge for that. I can't remember
the last time I made an operator-assisted call. (I think we use those
for things like "collect" calls.)

Where you live, there may be a prefix to use, before dialing long
distance. And then, there may be some scheme to get your phone
system to recognize 636-349-xxxx as being a valid North American
long distance number.

You probably need to look in the Help for the Fax and Scan, and
see if it has a section on world-wide dialing.

Note that, in some cities now in North America, you have to dial all
ten digits, all of the time. At one time, we had the distinction of
"local dialing" 349-xxxx seven digits, to reach a person within the
same city. And dialing 636-349-xxxx was needed once you got outside
your own town or city. Where I live, the exchange ran out of numbers,
so now we have to use all ten digits when dialing locally. It's still
charged as a local call, but all ten digits are needed to make sure
the numbers are unique.

Good luck,
Paul
 
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L

Loonie

A few weeks ago I had no problems with the Fax and Scan out to about 50
miles, in Ireland.

Now I want to fax to USA and am having problems. I had no problems
loading the files and images into Fax and Scan but the phone number
system seems to be a mess. I want to send a fax to 001 636-349-xxxx but
the Fax and Scan prog keeps telling me that I have to install a printer
"This machine is not connected to the Fax Printer on the selected Fax
Server." Why should I have a Fax Server? I do have a Zoom Fax modem.

Could it be that the internet modem is interfering? I had no faxing
problems a few weeks ago when faxing locally and the internet modem is
in the same state.

TIA
 
L

Loonie

A few weeks ago I had no problems with the Fax and Scan out to about 50
miles, in Ireland.

Now I want to fax to USA and am having problems. I had no problems
loading the files and images into Fax and Scan but the phone number
system seems to be a mess. I want to send a fax to 001 636-349-xxxx but
the Fax and Scan prog keeps telling me that I have to install a printer
"This machine is not connected to the Fax Printer on the selected Fax
Server." Why should I have a Fax Server? I do have a Zoom Fax modem.

Could it be that the internet modem is interfering? I had no faxing
problems a few weeks ago when faxing locally and the internet modem is
in the same state.

TIA
Now I'm convinced that the Phone and Modem prog is a pile of ****.
 
B

Bob I

Now I'm convinced that the Phone and Modem prog is a pile of ****.
Perhaps it is as simple as you don't have the "Fax" pointed at the fax
modem.
 
Z

Zaidy036

A few weeks ago I had no problems with the Fax and Scan out to about 50
miles, in Ireland.

Now I want to fax to USA and am having problems. I had no problems
loading the files and images into Fax and Scan but the phone number
system seems to be a mess. I want to send a fax to 001 636-349-xxxx but
the Fax and Scan prog keeps telling me that I have to install a printer
"This machine is not connected to the Fax Printer on the selected Fax
Server." Why should I have a Fax Server? I do have a Zoom Fax modem.

Could it be that the internet modem is interfering? I had no faxing
problems a few weeks ago when faxing locally and the internet modem is
in the same state.

TIA
Is "Dialing Rules" set to None?
Is "001" your correct prefix for the USA?
Are you listening on the line for an audible error response?

If all else fails you should be able to manually dial the number and
then "Send" after connection.
 
C

charlie

Is "Dialing Rules" set to None?
Is "001" your correct prefix for the USA?
Are you listening on the line for an audible error response?

If all else fails you should be able to manually dial the number and
then "Send" after connection.

In addition to the above, problems in dialing can be caused by not
enough delay between the country code, area code, and the basic phone
number.
The more or less "standard" was/is to insert an extra comma or two
between the country code and area code. Some modems can be sent a
"command string" to change some of the dialing default values.
Unfortunately, this is modem dependent.
 
L

Loonie

I'm in North America, and our phone system here uses ten digits for
long distance. That's the basic identifier. 636-349-xxxx

Now, if I want to "direct dial" the number, without operator assistance,
I put a "1" in front. So if I pick up the phone, and try
to reach that FAX machine, it would be 1-636-349-xxxx. I would
only be charged for connect time in minutes.

If I phone the operator, and ask him/her/it to dial 636-349-xxxx for
me, there would likely be some kind of charge for that. I can't remember
the last time I made an operator-assisted call. (I think we use those
for things like "collect" calls.)

Where you live, there may be a prefix to use, before dialing long
distance. And then, there may be some scheme to get your phone
system to recognize 636-349-xxxx as being a valid North American
long distance number.

You probably need to look in the Help for the Fax and Scan, and
see if it has a section on world-wide dialing.

Note that, in some cities now in North America, you have to dial all
ten digits, all of the time. At one time, we had the distinction of
"local dialing" 349-xxxx seven digits, to reach a person within the
same city. And dialing 636-349-xxxx was needed once you got outside
your own town or city. Where I live, the exchange ran out of numbers,
so now we have to use all ten digits when dialing locally. It's still
charged as a local call, but all ten digits are needed to make sure
the numbers are unique.

Good luck,
Paul
Thanks Paul. I'll have another go later today :)
 
L

Loonie

I'm in North America, and our phone system here uses ten digits for
long distance. That's the basic identifier. 636-349-xxxx

Now, if I want to "direct dial" the number, without operator assistance,
I put a "1" in front. So if I pick up the phone, and try
to reach that FAX machine, it would be 1-636-349-xxxx. I would
only be charged for connect time in minutes.

If I phone the operator, and ask him/her/it to dial 636-349-xxxx for
me, there would likely be some kind of charge for that. I can't remember
the last time I made an operator-assisted call. (I think we use those
for things like "collect" calls.)

Where you live, there may be a prefix to use, before dialing long
distance. And then, there may be some scheme to get your phone
system to recognize 636-349-xxxx as being a valid North American
long distance number.

You probably need to look in the Help for the Fax and Scan, and
see if it has a section on world-wide dialing.

Note that, in some cities now in North America, you have to dial all
ten digits, all of the time. At one time, we had the distinction of
"local dialing" 349-xxxx seven digits, to reach a person within the
same city. And dialing 636-349-xxxx was needed once you got outside
your own town or city. Where I live, the exchange ran out of numbers,
so now we have to use all ten digits when dialing locally. It's still
charged as a local call, but all ten digits are needed to make sure
the numbers are unique.

Good luck,
Paul
Thanks again Paul,

The instructions with this are truly abysmal.

It seemed that I had most of the work done - setup my pages to be faxed,
checked that the modem was alive and then, what was left, was the:

"To set up a fax server.
Before you begin, make sure your computer is connected to the network
and you know the network address of the fax server (for example,
\\mycompanyfaxserver).

1.Click the Start button , click All Programs, and then click Windows
Fax and Scan.
2.To use Fax view, click Fax at the bottom of the left pane.
3.Click the Tools menu, and then click Fax Accounts.
4.Click Add, and then, in the Fax Setup wizard, click Connect to a fax
server on my network and follow the instructions."

They made no effort whatsoever to relate the above faxserver to the fax
modem. I checked the phone number and I was correct in saying that the
number started with 001. I just dialed the complete number and it
answered. I corrected the phone number in the Fax program but there was
no change from its dead state.

From the Control Panel, the USB Modem Properties are correct - working
properly. A query to the modem indicated that all is well.

I went to Internet Properties and switched from 'Never Dial a
Connection' to 'Dial whenever a network connection is not present.' It
made no difference.
 
P

Paul

Loonie said:
Thanks again Paul,

The instructions with this are truly abysmal.

It seemed that I had most of the work done - setup my pages to be faxed,
checked that the modem was alive and then, what was left, was the:

"To set up a fax server.
Before you begin, make sure your computer is connected to the network
and you know the network address of the fax server (for example,
\\mycompanyfaxserver).

1.Click the Start button , click All Programs, and then click Windows
Fax and Scan.
2.To use Fax view, click Fax at the bottom of the left pane.
3.Click the Tools menu, and then click Fax Accounts.
4.Click Add, and then, in the Fax Setup wizard, click Connect to a fax
server on my network and follow the instructions."

They made no effort whatsoever to relate the above faxserver to the fax
modem. I checked the phone number and I was correct in saying that the
number started with 001. I just dialed the complete number and it
answered. I corrected the phone number in the Fax program but there was
no change from its dead state.

From the Control Panel, the USB Modem Properties are correct - working
properly. A query to the modem indicated that all is well.

I went to Internet Properties and switched from 'Never Dial a
Connection' to 'Dial whenever a network connection is not present.' It
made no difference.
The Microsoft site, has all sorts of tutorials. The only disadvantage
of them, is they use the tutorials to force people to install Silverlight.
At one time, all you needed was Windows Media Player, and the videos
were coincidental. Now, they introduce video when it isn't needed,
then make it Silverlight only. And to further aggravate, there is a
version of Silverlight for Linux, and I installed the software for that,
and Microsoft made sure the movies on microsoft.com, wouldn't play in the
Linux version of Silverlight. For some media, I use virtual machines to
play the media, and I can't even do that in this case. (I run other OSes
in a virtual machine, while Windows is running.)

Have a look here, and see if you can first get the fax modem recognized.

http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows7/Set-up-your-computer-to-send-and-receive-faxes

As an example, the dialup modem I've got, is too old to have a driver from
the manufacturer. Otherwise, it might be fun to plug it into the laptop
and give it a whirl. But even in WinXP, I had the devil of a time getting it
set up there (sorta took some hacking). And I can't keep buying stupid modems,
when the modem I've got is just fine as it is. So if I wanted to experiment
with that stuff, it would be *hours* of fun. Maybe yours will go a bit easier.

Paul
 
L

Loonie

Thank you again Paul.
The Microsoft site, has all sorts of tutorials. The only disadvantage
of them, is they use the tutorials to force people to install Silverlight.
At one time, all you needed was Windows Media Player, and the videos
were coincidental. Now, they introduce video when it isn't needed,
then make it Silverlight only. And to further aggravate, there is a
version of Silverlight for Linux, and I installed the software for that,
and Microsoft made sure the movies on microsoft.com, wouldn't play in the
Linux version of Silverlight. For some media, I use virtual machines to
play the media, and I can't even do that in this case. (I run other OSes
in a virtual machine, while Windows is running.)
I hated that silverlight from the first time I tried to use it and I
have tried a dozen times to kick it off my computer but that Micro****
has nailed down the useless piece of crap.
Have a look here, and see if you can first get the fax modem recognized.

http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows7/Set-up-your-computer-to-send-and-receive-faxes
I have seen this numerous times and never succeeded in getting past the
"Type the fax server location
Make sure ------------
Name:
For example \\mycompanyfax"

Where am I supposed to get 'mycompanyfax'? I looked up my Device Manager
and found USB Modem, so I tried \\USB Modem and, as usual, it didn't
work. This program, and the miserable instructions, are a pile of
Microcrap.
As an example, the dialup modem I've got, is too old to have a driver from
the manufacturer. Otherwise, it might be fun to plug it into the laptop
and give it a whirl. But even in WinXP, I had the devil of a time
getting it
set up there (sorta took some hacking). And I can't keep buying stupid
modems,
when the modem I've got is just fine as it is. So if I wanted to experiment
with that stuff, it would be *hours* of fun. Maybe yours will go a bit
easier.

Paul
Thanks for your patience :)
 
L

Loonie

Thank you again Paul.


I hated that silverlight from the first time I tried to use it and I
have tried a dozen times to kick it off my computer but that Micro****
has nailed down the useless piece of crap.


I have seen this numerous times and never succeeded in getting past the
"Type the fax server location
Make sure ------------
Name:
For example \\mycompanyfax"

Where am I supposed to get 'mycompanyfax'? I looked up my Device Manager
and found USB Modem, so I tried \\USB Modem and, as usual, it didn't
work. This program, and the miserable instructions, are a pile of
Microcrap.


Thanks for your patience :)
I had another quick look at : Device Mgr / Modems / USB Modem.
The Tools Menu in Windows Fax and Scan has "Fax Accounts." which shows
Account name: Fax Modem
Server: Local Fax (Default)
Status: Disconnected.

This shows that the local modem is working but how, or where, can the
system be Connected, if it is now Disconnecte?
 
P

Paul

Loonie said:
I have seen this numerous times and never succeeded in getting past the
"Type the fax server location
Make sure ------------
Name:
For example \\mycompanyfax"

Where am I supposed to get 'mycompanyfax'? I looked up my Device Manager
and found USB Modem, so I tried \\USB Modem and, as usual, it didn't
work. This program, and the miserable instructions, are a pile of
Microcrap.
It would be this section:

"To set up a fax modem

Before you begin, make sure you've properly installed your fax modem,
and that it's plugged in to a standard analog phone line.

1. Click the Start button Picture of the Start button, click All Programs,
and then click Windows Fax and Scan.

2. At the bottom of the left pane, click Fax, and then click New Fax on the toolbar to launch the Fax Setup wizard.

3. Click "Connect to a fax modem" and follow the instructions.

To set up your computer to only send faxes, not receive them, click
I'll choose later; I want to create a fax now in the Fax Setup wizard."

*******

Now, I just tested this on the Windows 7 laptop. I moved a USB to serial
adapter plus serial port dialup modem, over to the laptop.

When you "Connect to a fax modem", it won't have one to select,
unless there is a modem listed in Device Manager. And Device Manager
doesn't even show an "Unknown device" for my dialup modem.

What I had to do is:

1) Install USB to serial adapter driver. None was available in
Windows 7. I got a driver from Windows Update. A few minutes
later, I got the latest one from FTDI (adapter manuf.). There
are two installs to do there, for two levels of protocol.

2) Next, the modem doesn't show up, in any way. I had to
install a "Standard Modem" and tell the software it was
on "COM3", in order for the driver to be installed. That
makes use of things like the standard Hayes command set.

3) Once that was installed, I go back to Device Manager, and now
there is a Modem entry showing, corresponding to the "Standard Modem".
(As my modem has no manufacturer provided driver available,
just the generic Windows-provided driver is enough.) In the
Device Manager entry for the modem, is a communications test.
At this point, the blinking lights on the modem start, while
the Device Manager diagnostic executes "ID" commands on the
COM3 port.

Now, back in Fax and Scan, there is a modem to use. If I follow the
instructions on

http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows7/Set-up-your-computer-to-send-and-receive-faxes

and "Just send a fax", now the modem shows up as a candidate for
a way to transmit.

I can't actually send the fax, because I've got no place to send it.

So it seems to work, at least up to the point of selecting the
dialup fax modem (not a fax server). I didn't actually check that
it can send stuff. That's your job now.

Paul
 
L

Loonie

It would be this section:

"To set up a fax modem

Before you begin, make sure you've properly installed your fax modem,
and that it's plugged in to a standard analog phone line.

1. Click the Start button Picture of the Start button, click All Programs,
and then click Windows Fax and Scan.

2. At the bottom of the left pane, click Fax, and then click New Fax on
the toolbar to launch the Fax Setup wizard.

3. Click "Connect to a fax modem" and follow the instructions.

To set up your computer to only send faxes, not receive them, click
I'll choose later; I want to create a fax now in the Fax Setup wizard."

*******

Now, I just tested this on the Windows 7 laptop. I moved a USB to serial
adapter plus serial port dialup modem, over to the laptop.

When you "Connect to a fax modem", it won't have one to select,
unless there is a modem listed in Device Manager. And Device Manager
doesn't even show an "Unknown device" for my dialup modem.

What I had to do is:

1) Install USB to serial adapter driver. None was available in
Windows 7. I got a driver from Windows Update. A few minutes
later, I got the latest one from FTDI (adapter manuf.). There
are two installs to do there, for two levels of protocol.

2) Next, the modem doesn't show up, in any way. I had to
install a "Standard Modem" and tell the software it was
on "COM3", in order for the driver to be installed. That
makes use of things like the standard Hayes command set.

3) Once that was installed, I go back to Device Manager, and now
there is a Modem entry showing, corresponding to the "Standard Modem".
(As my modem has no manufacturer provided driver available,
just the generic Windows-provided driver is enough.) In the
Device Manager entry for the modem, is a communications test.
At this point, the blinking lights on the modem start, while
the Device Manager diagnostic executes "ID" commands on the
COM3 port.

Now, back in Fax and Scan, there is a modem to use. If I follow the
instructions on

http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows7/Set-up-your-computer-to-send-and-receive-faxes


and "Just send a fax", now the modem shows up as a candidate for
a way to transmit.

I can't actually send the fax, because I've got no place to send it.

So it seems to work, at least up to the point of selecting the
dialup fax modem (not a fax server). I didn't actually check that
it can send stuff. That's your job now.

Paul
Thanks again Paul for your efforts. You are very helpful. :)

I went back to the Instructions:

To set up a fax modem
Before you begin, make sure you've properly installed your fax modem,
and that it's plugged in to a standard analog phone line.

1 Click the Start button , click All Programs, and then click Windows
Fax and Scan.

2 At the bottom of the left pane, click Fax, and then click New Fax on
the toolbar to launch the Fax Setup wizard.

[Now, at this stage the New Fax appears. I looked through all this New
Fax and, apart from one item, the Dialing Rule that wanted my area code,
I saw nowhere in New Fax a mention of a fax modem]

3 Click Connect to a fax modem and follow the instructions.

They want a Dialing Rule for the New Fax - my area code - and that is as
close as we can get to a Dialing Rule. What a mess of an effort for a
fax modem!

I have installed at least 8 fax modems since the mid 1980s and each one
took about 1/2 hour to install and get working. Seems like the present
system is going down a rathole.
 
P

Paul

Loonie said:
Thanks again Paul for your efforts. You are very helpful. :)

I went back to the Instructions:

To set up a fax modem
Before you begin, make sure you've properly installed your fax modem,
and that it's plugged in to a standard analog phone line.

1 Click the Start button , click All Programs, and then click Windows
Fax and Scan.

2 At the bottom of the left pane, click Fax, and then click New Fax
on the toolbar to launch the Fax Setup wizard.

[Now, at this stage the New Fax appears. I looked through all this New
Fax and, apart from one item, the Dialing Rule that wanted my area code,
I saw nowhere in New Fax a mention of a fax modem]

3 Click Connect to a fax modem and follow the instructions.

They want a Dialing Rule for the New Fax - my area code - and that is as
close as we can get to a Dialing Rule. What a mess of an effort for a
fax modem!

I have installed at least 8 fax modems since the mid 1980s and each one
took about 1/2 hour to install and get working. Seems like the present
system is going down a rathole.
As soon as I clicked the "New FAX", it started asking for details of the modem.

Maybe you've already specified a modem somehow ?

I think the second time I tried it, it didn't ask for the modem. So it seems
to assume the original choice is still good.

And that means, there *has* to be an interface somewhere, to configure it.
Keep looking. I don't have the thing set up any more, to test it for you.

Paul
 
L

Loonie

Loonie said:
Thanks again Paul for your efforts. You are very helpful. :)

I went back to the Instructions:

To set up a fax modem
Before you begin, make sure you've properly installed your fax modem,
and that it's plugged in to a standard analog phone line.

1 Click the Start button , click All Programs, and then click Windows
Fax and Scan.

2 At the bottom of the left pane, click Fax, and then click New Fax on
the toolbar to launch the Fax Setup wizard.

[Now, at this stage the New Fax appears. I looked through all this New
Fax and, apart from one item, the Dialing Rule that wanted my area
code, I saw nowhere in New Fax a mention of a fax modem]

3 Click Connect to a fax modem and follow the instructions.

They want a Dialing Rule for the New Fax - my area code - and that is
as close as we can get to a Dialing Rule. What a mess of an effort for
a fax modem!

I have installed at least 8 fax modems since the mid 1980s and each
one took about 1/2 hour to install and get working. Seems like the
present system is going down a rathole.
As soon as I clicked the "New FAX", it started asking for details of the
modem.

Maybe you've already specified a modem somehow ?

I think the second time I tried it, it didn't ask for the modem. So it
seems
to assume the original choice is still good.

And that means, there *has* to be an interface somewhere, to configure it.
Keep looking. I don't have the thing set up any more, to test it for you.

Paul
Thanks again Paul. I agree with what you have done. I have dropped that
piece of garbage too.

I found another replacement - EssentialFax - and it looked reasonable.
It did connect very well with the modem. However, when it came to adding
in 3 .jpgs and one RTF, it flopped. Reading through the manual was a big
chore and the instructions were far from clear. With previous faxing all
I had to do was to drop them into a folder on the program. I could not
find the place to drop them and I sent EssentialFax an email looking for
a solution.

If you feel like trying a new prog, you can download it and get 30 days
of free use. The price is about $30, which I think is reasonable.
www.EssentialFax.com.

My computer will be very cluttered with fax progs very soon and removing
them can be another huge chore. WinFax was my favorite for more than a
decade until Win 7 appeared. It won't work and Symantic could not give a
damn and the program that could normally remove it from the computer is
missing. It seems that one or two little progs could get it running again.
 
N

Neil Turkenkopf

"Loonie" wrote in message
Loonie said:
Thanks again Paul for your efforts. You are very helpful. :)

I went back to the Instructions:

To set up a fax modem
Before you begin, make sure you've properly installed your fax modem,
and that it's plugged in to a standard analog phone line.

1 Click the Start button , click All Programs, and then click Windows
Fax and Scan.

2 At the bottom of the left pane, click Fax, and then click New Fax on
the toolbar to launch the Fax Setup wizard.

[Now, at this stage the New Fax appears. I looked through all this New
Fax and, apart from one item, the Dialing Rule that wanted my area
code, I saw nowhere in New Fax a mention of a fax modem]

3 Click Connect to a fax modem and follow the instructions.

They want a Dialing Rule for the New Fax - my area code - and that is
as close as we can get to a Dialing Rule. What a mess of an effort for
a fax modem!

I have installed at least 8 fax modems since the mid 1980s and each
one took about 1/2 hour to install and get working. Seems like the
present system is going down a rathole.
As soon as I clicked the "New FAX", it started asking for details of the
modem.

Maybe you've already specified a modem somehow ?

I think the second time I tried it, it didn't ask for the modem. So it
seems
to assume the original choice is still good.

And that means, there *has* to be an interface somewhere, to configure it.
Keep looking. I don't have the thing set up any more, to test it for you.

Paul
Thanks again Paul. I agree with what you have done. I have dropped that
piece of garbage too.

I found another replacement - EssentialFax - and it looked reasonable.
It did connect very well with the modem. However, when it came to adding
in 3 .jpgs and one RTF, it flopped. Reading through the manual was a big
chore and the instructions were far from clear. With previous faxing all
I had to do was to drop them into a folder on the program. I could not
find the place to drop them and I sent EssentialFax an email looking for
a solution.

If you feel like trying a new prog, you can download it and get 30 days
of free use. The price is about $30, which I think is reasonable.
www.EssentialFax.com.

My computer will be very cluttered with fax progs very soon and removing
them can be another huge chore. WinFax was my favorite for more than a
decade until Win 7 appeared. It won't work and Symantic could not give a
damn and the program that could normally remove it from the computer is
missing. It seems that one or two little progs could get it running again.
-----------

Hi guys!

I've been following this thread with interest, as I recently had some faxing
problems too.
I'm running Win7x64 and even though I have a cable modem for Internet
access,
I still use a USB modem (plugged into the old telephone wall jack) for
Faxing.

Works great, but try converting your JPEGs to TIFFs first!
(That's the only way I could send anything beside the cover sheet.) <g>

Hope this helps!
Neil ¦¬D
--
 
C

Char Jackson

I found another replacement - EssentialFax - and it looked reasonable.
It did connect very well with the modem. However, when it came to adding
in 3 .jpgs and one RTF, it flopped. Reading through the manual was a big
chore and the instructions were far from clear. With previous faxing all
I had to do was to drop them into a folder on the program. I could not
find the place to drop them and I sent EssentialFax an email looking for
a solution.
I don't know why you feel there should be a place to "drop" documents.
You could just follow the instructions at their web site if the manual
wasn't clear.

<http://www.essentialfax.com/fax-software/knowledgebase.html>
<http://www.essentialfax.com/fax-software/faq.html>
 
L

Loonie

I don't know why you feel there should be a place to "drop" documents.
You could just follow the instructions at their web site if the manual
wasn't clear.

<http://www.essentialfax.com/fax-software/knowledgebase.html>
<http://www.essentialfax.com/fax-software/faq.html>
Thanks Char for your comments. The instructions I find are the vaguest I
have ever seen. If you know anything about it, I would appreciate it.
I used WinFaxPro for years with virtually no problems. This EssentialFax
program is the fuzziest I have ever seen. Now tell me what you would do
if you had 3 images and one text file to send.
 
L

Loonie

in message
Loonie said:
Thanks again Paul for your efforts. You are very helpful. :)

I went back to the Instructions:

To set up a fax modem
Before you begin, make sure you've properly installed your fax modem,
and that it's plugged in to a standard analog phone line.

1 Click the Start button , click All Programs, and then click Windows
Fax and Scan.

2 At the bottom of the left pane, click Fax, and then click New Fax on
the toolbar to launch the Fax Setup wizard.

[Now, at this stage the New Fax appears. I looked through all this New
Fax and, apart from one item, the Dialing Rule that wanted my area
code, I saw nowhere in New Fax a mention of a fax modem]

3 Click Connect to a fax modem and follow the instructions.

They want a Dialing Rule for the New Fax - my area code - and that is
as close as we can get to a Dialing Rule. What a mess of an effort for
a fax modem!

I have installed at least 8 fax modems since the mid 1980s and each
one took about 1/2 hour to install and get working. Seems like the
present system is going down a rathole.
As soon as I clicked the "New FAX", it started asking for details of the
modem.

Maybe you've already specified a modem somehow ?

I think the second time I tried it, it didn't ask for the modem. So it
seems
to assume the original choice is still good.

And that means, there *has* to be an interface somewhere, to configure
it.
Keep looking. I don't have the thing set up any more, to test it for you.

Paul
Thanks again Paul. I agree with what you have done. I have dropped that
piece of garbage too.

I found another replacement - EssentialFax - and it looked reasonable.
It did connect very well with the modem. However, when it came to adding
in 3 .jpgs and one RTF, it flopped. Reading through the manual was a big
chore and the instructions were far from clear. With previous faxing all
I had to do was to drop them into a folder on the program. I could not
find the place to drop them and I sent EssentialFax an email looking for
a solution.

If you feel like trying a new prog, you can download it and get 30 days
of free use. The price is about $30, which I think is reasonable.
www.EssentialFax.com.

My computer will be very cluttered with fax progs very soon and removing
them can be another huge chore. WinFax was my favorite for more than a
decade until Win 7 appeared. It won't work and Symantic could not give a
damn and the program that could normally remove it from the computer is
missing. It seems that one or two little progs could get it running again.
-----------

Hi guys!

I've been following this thread with interest, as I recently had some
faxing problems too.
I'm running Win7x64 and even though I have a cable modem for Internet
access,
I still use a USB modem (plugged into the old telephone wall jack) for
Faxing.

Works great, but try converting your JPEGs to TIFFs first!
(That's the only way I could send anything beside the cover sheet.) <g>

Hope this helps!
Neil ¦¬D
Thanks Neil. This is the first time I have ever known that a TIF file
should be better than a jpg. Most likely the TIF file can be sharper but
I can't understand why that would matter in plain faxing.
 
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