eMail Client For Me


K

Ken Springer

FYI, the constant deliberate misspellings don't reflect well on you.
+1

--
Ken

Mac OS X 10.8.4
Firefox 20.0
Thunderbird 17.0.5
LibreOffice 4.0.3.3
 
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C

Char Jackson

Seems like no one wishes to offer any opinions, but I will. And I'm
sure I won't stay out of trouble! LOL



I used Outlook 2007 until my XP computer self-destructed, and I switched
to the Mac. Technically, it wasn't an email program, it was a contact
manager. Email was done by accessing OE routines. How it works now, as
a stand alone program, I don't know. But it's not free.

I liked it. It had lots of filtering capabilities which is something I
would want. But, it doesn't do newsgroups.
Outlook is most definitely an email program and does not need OE for that.
You're probably thinking of Usenet access, which did require OE.
 
K

Ken Blake

Outlook is most definitely an email program and does not need OE for that.

Right! Every version of Outlook has been a personal information
manager, and as a PIM, it did e-mail. And it has always done it
completely by itself. It never required Outlook Express for e-mail,
and since it always ran on other versions of Windows besides XP, it
was not possible that it required Outlook Express, since Outlook
Express didn't run on anything but Windows XP..

You're probably thinking of Usenet access, which did require OE.

A clarification to that, if I may: Outlook's Usenet access didn't
really require Outlook Express; it essentially didn't exist. at all
(although Microsoft made it look like it did). If you were running
Windows XP, you could tell Outlook to do Usenet, and if you did, by
default (although it could be changed) all it did was invoke Outlook
Express. And if you were running Outlook under a different version of
Windows, invoking Outlook Express wasn't an option.
 
X

XS11E

Char Jackson said:
FYI, the constant deliberate misspellings don't reflect well on
you.
There's no misspelling, just ridiculing a bit of garbage software.

T'Burp has become something that I really and truly dislike. It's a
perfect example of "don't fix what's not broke." Mozilla took a fairly
decent email client and turned it into unusable crap by "improving" it.

Very similar to what's happened to Norton, McAfee, etc..

How can anyone NOT make fun of it?
 
J

J. P. Gilliver (John)

In message <kpvom9$h2r$1@dont-email.me>, Paul <nospam@needed.com>
writes:
[]
If you like the idea of "suites", then Seamonkey is another
example of a suite. Sort of like the old Netscape. Since
the email code is just Thunderbird in disguise, expect the
code base to share some things. I like Seamonkey, just as
[]
Probably less of a problem with SM, since AIUI it is maintained by the
same people as TB, but I am wary of "Thunderbird in disguise", because I
"helped" my blind friend, when he moved to 7, by installing Eudora OSE
(open source edition), which was actually Thunderbird tricked out to
look like Eudora (he had been using Eudora on XP, and I thought its
being Thunderbird really would make it more future-proof: Eudora itself
was known not to be being developed further and to require tweaks to
work under 7). I also did the same for a friend of his who was also
moving to 7, so they could ask each other about things.

Unfortunately "Eudora OSE" seemed to be a version of TB 1.x, and was
never updated. It actually worked fine as far as it went. The sighted
friend had some confusion with her ISP email access password; as TB
users know, TB doesn't have anywhere among the settings where you enter
the email access password - instead, if an attempt to fetch email
doesn't work for password reasons, a box pops up asking for the password
(with a "remember" option). As far as I could tell, that wasn't
happening, so there was no way to change the password it was
"remembering". For her, I eventually just installed the latest version
of TB, which actually picked up all the settings from her "Eudora OSE",
but when run and sent for email _did_ prompt for a new password; all is
well there, as TB looks sufficiently like Eudora OSE (unsurprisingly)
that she has no problem using it. For the blind friend, we had to give
up with Eudora OSE because we just couldn't find how to move the cursor
into the text entry part of an email with the usual keys (tab etc.),
which is necessary - blind folk of course don't use a mouse. (I think
there were other bits we couldn't get into either.) We eventually put
real Eudora on - the last version (7 I think) _does_ run fine on 7, and
if there were tweaks required they were minimal, I can't remember. So
that's another client that works on 7, but isn't being developed, so you
probably wouldn't want to consider it.

So when I see "Thunderbord in disguise", I'm wary! Though as I say I
think this is _less_ of a danger with Seamonkey as I think that is
maintained by the TB folk anyway, sort of.

(And why do I nearly always mistype TB as 'bord!)
 
J

J. P. Gilliver (John)

Ken Blake said:
[]
Outlook is most definitely an email program and does not need OE for that.

Right! Every version of Outlook has been a personal information
manager, and as a PIM, it did e-mail. And it has always done it
completely by itself. It never required Outlook Express for e-mail,
and since it always ran on other versions of Windows besides XP, it
was not possible that it required Outlook Express, since Outlook
Express didn't run on anything but Windows XP..
[]
OE ran on the '9x series ... (-:
 
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B

Bob Henson

There's no misspelling, just ridiculing a bit of garbage software.

T'Burp has become something that I really and truly dislike. It's a
perfect example of "don't fix what's not broke." Mozilla took a fairly
decent email client and turned it into unusable crap by "improving" it.

Very similar to what's happened to Norton, McAfee, etc..

How can anyone NOT make fun of it?
How can anyone NOT put you in their Bozo File. Plonk!
 
Z

Zaphod Beeblebrox

FYI, the constant deliberate misspellings don't reflect well on you.
Agreed, seems pretty juvenile.

--
Zaphod

"So [Trillian], two heads is what does it for a girl?"
"...Anything else [Zaphod]'s got two of?"
- Arthur Dent
 
K

Ken Blake

Ken Blake said:
[]
Outlook is most definitely an email program and does not need OE for that.

Right! Every version of Outlook has been a personal information
manager, and as a PIM, it did e-mail. And it has always done it
completely by itself. It never required Outlook Express for e-mail,
and since it always ran on other versions of Windows besides XP, it
was not possible that it required Outlook Express, since Outlook
Express didn't run on anything but Windows XP..
[]
OE ran on the '9x series ... (-:

Yes, you're right. I had forgotten that. Sorry for the error, and
thanks for the correction.
 
G

Gene E. Bloch

as TB
users know, TB doesn't have anywhere among the settings where you enter
the email access password - instead, if an attempt to fetch email
doesn't work for password reasons, a box pops up asking for the password
(with a "remember" option). As far as I could tell, that wasn't
happening, so there was no way to change the password it was
"remembering".
I *think* I recall that the way I got that prompt back a while ago was
to remove the account and reinstall it. However, that trick sounds
dangerous to me at the moment, so if you need to do it again, I don't
recommend trying it without further research (translation: don't
necessarily trust me on this one).

And I can't find anything on the issue in my collection of notes...
 
G

Gene E. Bloch

I *think* I recall that the way I got that prompt back a while ago was
to remove the account and reinstall it. However, that trick sounds
dangerous to me at the moment, so if you need to do it again, I don't
recommend trying it without further research (translation: don't
necessarily trust me on this one).

And I can't find anything on the issue in my collection of notes...
Well, a few seconds with Google got me this easy *and safe* way...

http://kb.mozillazine.org/Password_not_remembered_(Thunderbird)

Caveat: they say

"Tools - Options - Passwords - View Saved Passwords - Show Passwords"
(slightly edited to remove greater-than signs), but I had to use

"Tools - Options - SECURITY - Passwords - Saved Passwords - Show
Passwords"

to get there.

Actually seeing the passwords is optional, but anyway, on that panel you
can remove a password from a given account. That should get the question
back. Sorry, I'm gunshy about trying it myself to verify it :)

The webpage also shows a way to get the checkbox back if it's missing,
and there's a section "Doesn't prompt for a password", so take a look
 
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J

John Williamson

Gene said:
I *think* I recall that the way I got that prompt back a while ago was
to remove the account and reinstall it. However, that trick sounds
dangerous to me at the moment, so if you need to do it again, I don't
recommend trying it without further research (translation: don't
necessarily trust me on this one).

And I can't find anything on the issue in my collection of notes...
Options - Privacy - edit passwords.

Whe you open the dialogue box, it will ask you whether you do actually
want to show the passwords.

Sometimes, a page or maolbox may use a non-standard password field,
which Thunderbird and Firefox have trouble recognising.
 
G

Gene E. Bloch

Options - Privacy - edit passwords.

Whe you open the dialogue box, it will ask you whether you do actually
want to show the passwords.
As I posted three hours earlier. But I'm guessing that my post wasn't
yet available to you when you wrote the above :)

Sometimes, a page or maolbox may use a non-standard password field,
which Thunderbird and Firefox have trouble recognising.
Interesting.

I've never experienced that, probably because I never automate the
entering of passwords outside of my e-mail & Usenet providers.
 
J

J. P. Gilliver (John)

I was very leery of removing the person's account! She could _send_
fine, so it was only half broken.
Well, a few seconds with Google got me this easy *and safe* way...

http://kb.mozillazine.org/Password_not_remembered_(Thunderbird)

Caveat: they say

"Tools - Options - Passwords - View Saved Passwords - Show Passwords"
(slightly edited to remove greater-than signs), but I had to use

"Tools - Options - SECURITY - Passwords - Saved Passwords - Show
Passwords"

to get there.

Actually seeing the passwords is optional, but anyway, on that panel you
can remove a password from a given account. That should get the question
back. Sorry, I'm gunshy about trying it myself to verify it :)
Yes, I think I found that one too. Still didn't cause the prompt box to
come back. I think that version of T'bird 1.x was just broken.
[]
 
J

J. P. Gilliver (John)

In message <b2js6iF2svkU2@mid.individual.net>, John Williamson
Whe you open the dialogue box, it will ask you whether you do actually
want to show the passwords.
I'm familiar with that in Firefox.
Sometimes, a page or maolbox may use a non-standard password field,
which Thunderbird and Firefox have trouble recognising.
Are you talking about web-based mailing, which I associate with a
browser. This was an ordinary POP/SMTP mail account (talktalk, one of
UK's larger providers).

I was trying to fix it over TeamViewer (we're near opposite ends of the
country). Anyway, I eventually just downloaded the latest T'bird, which
picked up all the settings - and mailboxes, and such - from the existing
version, and _did_ prompt for the password when necessary, so - touch
wood! - the problem has gone.

I think what I was mainly saying was that I'm wary of "customised"
versions of T'bird, because of fear that they are more likely to be
abandoned than the core version. But this is probably less likely to be
the case with SeaMonkey.
 
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J

jim

On Tue, 18 Jun 2013 07:51:12 -0700, in
Other than
OE Just seems too outdated.
Outlook Fancy but I could never grow into it.
Live Mail It's Microsoft. Love it or hate it.
Opera I like the web browser and eMail is pretty good.

What other recommended free email clients are recommended.
I know that certain features and peccadilloes make an eMail client
liked or disliked so maybe also say what those features are.

Important to me: In addition can anyone identify which email clients
can download headers but not attachments until called for? I get
eMails with large attachments that take too long to download. I need
to select the eMail and download only those attachments that I
immediately need.

I want a mail client so I can be notified upon mail arrival so I do not
have to go to e.g. Hotmail or GMail etc to look.



--- news://freenews.netfront.net/ - complaints: (e-mail address removed) ---
I would suggest Seamonkey or Thunderbird, both from Mozilla. Both sons of
Netscape. -- jim
 
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