Confused with 32 bit and 64 bit


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I am in the process of looking for a new PC. While trying to figure out if I really want quad core or if a duo core will suffice, I bumped up against another issue.
32 bit or 64 bit? The only recommendation I have gotten so far was to stay away from 64 bit as my peripherals won't work. Which is only a HP C5180 printer.
I pretty much only surf the net and use use photo shop type programs.
Looking for ideas.
 
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Kalario

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64 bit and never look back. Make sure you have 4gb of RAM.
 

Kalario

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last yers best is fine. Make sure it can run the 64bit. If yes, then go for it. You will not regret it. The 32bit is so passe
 

Nibiru2012

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catilley1092

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jimpierece7, welcome to the forum! Last year's best will be alright, as long as it's 64 bit. It will run on 2GB RAM, but 4GB is far better.

As far as dual or quad core, that depends on how much you want to spend. But personally, if I had to do it all over again, I would go quad core, as it's getting closer to being the standard. I'm telling you from experience, if you can afford quad core, go for it. The reason why I tell you this? There's a project that a few of us are involved in, and my dual core won't run the high performance client at the speed to get the job done. A quad won't cost that much more.

Also, it would really be a good idea to shop around. The office stores have some good deals, and so does Newegg. But, stay as far away from Best Buy as you can. They were going to charge me nearly $100 more for my desktop than I got it for at HP direct, plus all of that "geek" crap they try to sell you. If you know how to use a computer, you don't need to pay the "geek squad" $99 to set it up for you. I pulled mine out of the box, powered it on and waited for 20 or so minutes as directed, then typed in my name, address & phone #, then established my internet connection. Well, that's what those "geeks" do for your $99, except they don't do your internet connection, they don't physically setup your computer at your desk or workstation, they will sell you extra crap you don't need and install that for you, you can bring your box and garbage from the box it came in back to them and they'll dispose it for you. Isn't that nice of them?

I kept my box & packing materials in case of a warranty return. And speaking of warranties, you can get a three year one from SquareTrade for a third of the price you pay at the retailers. And if it breaks down, you are emailed a shipping label, and if the repairs exceeds what the computer is worth, they will refund every penny you paid for it. I'm living testimony to that, on two occasions. I received back $350 over a hard drive, and $185 for an internal problem where the battery wouldn't charge properly. And I have another one that is on it's last leg right now, I paid $400 for it. They pay their claims super fast, and keep you informed every step of the way.

Hopefully, my post has been of some help to you, and I hope that you find the computer that has your name written on it soon.

Best of Luck,
Cat
 
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thank you all very much for the help!!! My old Pentium 4 has done its time. Starting to run hot and so so slow.
 
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I am in the process of looking for a new PC. While trying to figure out if I really want quad core or if a duo core will suffice, I bumped up against another issue.
32 bit or 64 bit? The only recommendation I have gotten so far was to stay away from 64 bit as my peripherals won't work. Which is only a HP C5180 printer.
I pretty much only surf the net and use use photo shop type programs.
Looking for ideas.[/QUOTE]

What kind of processor do you have presently? If it's a dual core and you think you'd like just a little more power, you could still upgrade to a faster dual core if you're trying to hold down the cost.
If you're going with Intel, here's where you can check out what's available for processors, might help you make a decision........
http://ark.intel.com/Default.aspx
 
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catilley1092

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He has an old Pentium 4, I don't think it's a dual core at all. My advice is to do quad, if you can afford it. You won't regret it, and the price difference a "premium" dual core and a standard quad is minimal. I wish I had one right now, I could run one of the high performance folding clients. That's the difference between dual & quad, is standard performance vs high performance. It takes more than RAM to have it all, although a minimum of 4GB RAM helps, too.
 
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The old Pentium 4. And no, it isn't dual core. As I do want a better machine this time, and one that may keep up a little longer, the quad core sounds like the way to go.
Due to some unemployment credit issues from a year ago I will be getting it threw a place costs a little more then usual but does let me use a payment plan. Acer, Lenovo and HP will be what I choose from.
 

yodap

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Welcome to the forum!! :congrats:

Good luck with your purchase.
 

Nibiru2012

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thank you all very much for the help!!! My old Pentium 4 has done its time. Starting to run hot and so so slow.
There are two reasons your Pentium is starting to run hotter than normal.

1. Your CPU cooler heatsink is clogged with dust and debris and needs a good cleaning.

2. The thermal compound or TIM as it's called these days that makes a "heat transfer" conduction between your CPU and the heatsink has aged and gone bad. Especially with stock coolers supplied by Intel and AMD, they use a wax or paraffin-based material that through time and heat it dries up and begins to crack and get hard.

The best cure would be to removed the CPU heatsink, clean it up and such, and remove all the old compound and put some new TIM on the CPU, then re-mount the cooler.

Regarding the new CPU choice, I use an Intel Core-2 Duo Dual Core and it rocks. It's an E8400 @ 3.0 GHz clock speed and does everything I could possibly ask of it.

The only reason I would recommend a Quad-Core is if you run a LOT of applications at once, use Photoshop, Auto-CAD, a heavy gamer or video intensive software. If not, then a Dual-Core will suffice for your needs.

The BIGGEST key is to get enough RAM to have a smooth running operating system. I recommend at least 4GB for a 64-bit system.

Since the new computer will be made with all 64-bit hardware and components, there is no reason not to go to a 64-bit Windows 7.

To use a NASCAR term, putting a 32-bit operating system on a 64-bit capable computer is like putting restrictor plate on the intake manifold.

What ever decision you make will be the right one for you though.
 

catilley1092

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The old Pentium 4. And no, it isn't dual core. As I do want a better machine this time, and one that may keep up a little longer, the quad core sounds like the way to go.
Due to some unemployment credit issues from a year ago I will be getting it threw a place costs a little more then usual but does let me use a payment plan. Acer, Lenovo and HP will be what I choose from.
jimpierce7, you won't go wrong with the quad core, believe me. I wished that I had one myself. But when I buy a new notebook, I can correct that mistake of buying a dual core. I'll make sure that I buy a quad, hopefully I can find one (most likely AMD) for around $600 (hopefully). Lenovo does attract me, as does HP. I'll find the best deal that meets my budget, if I need a little more cash, I can hold off another month or two. Congrats on your purchase, I think you'll be pleased with the power of quad core computing, and within a year or two, it'll be mainstream anyway, Nibiru made a post on it a couple of months ago, quad is gaining momentum, just as 64 bit is.

Best of Luck,
Cat
 

Nibiru2012

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I'll make sure that I buy a quad, hopefully I can find one (most likely AMD) for around $600 (hopefully).
Cat - to be honest a Quad-Core CPU on a notebook computer is overkill, in my opinion. Unless you're a serious die-hard gamer you won't see any benefit at all.

Also to find one for around $600 even with an AMD CPU will be sketchy to say the least.

You're trying to put a 426 HEMI with dual 4 barrel Holley 750 CFM carbs in a Rambler Nash!

Quad-Cores are really more for the desktop market, where there is adequate cooling capacity and better power.
 
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Cat - to be honest a Quad-Core CPU on a notebook computer is overkill, in my opinion. Unless you're a serious die-hard gamer you won't see any benefit at all.

Also to find one for around $600 even with an AMD CPU will be sketchy to say the least.

You're trying to put a 426 HEMI with dual 4 barrel Holley 750 CFM carbs in a Rambler Nash!

Quad-Cores are really more for the desktop market, where there is adequate cooling capacity and better power.
Nibiru I'm old enough to remember all about those 426 Hemi's and dual quad Holley's! :D
Ah, the memories! Colorful analogy, but true. :D
 

catilley1092

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Cat - to be honest a Quad-Core CPU on a notebook computer is overkill, in my opinion. Unless you're a serious die-hard gamer you won't see any benefit at all.

Also to find one for around $600 even with an AMD CPU will be sketchy to say the least.

You're trying to put a 426 HEMI with dual 4 barrel Holley 750 CFM carbs in a Rambler Nash!

Quad-Cores are really more for the desktop market, where there is adequate cooling capacity and better power.
I'll see benefit when I'm folding, there's no doubt about that. I'll do some serious homework before my next purchase, if I can't get it for that price, no problem, I'll put more cash up until I can get it.

My last purchase (this desktop) was made, based on advice from PC World. As I remember the article, "the best sub-$750 PC's". The computer is fine for ordinary use, but try to run a high performance program, you're in one of those Rambler's.

This is why when I make my next notebook purchase, I'll shop until I get what I want. If I can't get it for $600, then mabye $800 will do. I don't know. But I want a performer, and you must pay for performance, if that's what you want. I'm already stashing some cash now for the cause, and somewhere out there, is a serious performance notebook with my name on it.

And I will have it in writing that if it doesn't meet my expectations, I can return it for a refund. It will have to run that high performance folding client, and have the jobs done before the deadline, on a continual basis, plus anything else I want it to do. The first week, that would be good, that will make sure that thermal paste takes good to it.:D
 
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TrainableMan

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Folding is processor intensive, so yes a quad core would be a benefit, similar to if you run autocad applications. But for normal users the most processor intensive apps they will run will be 3D gaming and in that case the graphics card in the laptop will limit the usefulness of the extra processor power. If you go to Control Panel\System and click the "Windows Experience Index" I think you find the gaming graphics index holds your computer back even though your processor index on a quad four is great.
 
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