Classic Shell


K

Ken Springer

I won't use Win7's Start Menu, I use Classic Shell on Win7 as well.
I installed Classic Shell on my Win 7 Starter netbook. But I want to
try something else on the "still a work in progress" Win 7 desktop.


--
Ken

Mac OS X 10.8.4
Firefox 22.0
Thunderbird 17.0.7
LibreOffice 4.0.4.2
 
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W

Wolf K

But I do expect a tablet to have the power of a laptop. And I expect it
will happen within a couple of years. Or less. A tablet already has more
power than the average PC/Mac of around 10 years ago.
And what kind of power could a desktop have by then? <BG> I don't care
for laptops, hate the #$^%@%&$#*& keyboards! But am considering a
tablet of some type, more as an ereader than anything else. Leaning
towards an iPad Mini, not because it's Apple, but due to the size plus
high screen resolution. [...]
My granddaughter has an iPad mini. She loves it as a camera, and it's
also good for surfing, e-mail, etc over wi-fi. First thing we did when
she visited was to put our home network key on it.

My assessment: It's a more powerful machine than typical
desktops/laptops of 10 years ago. With a wireless keyboard, link to your
smart TV, a port for an external drive, and auto-magic joining to
networked printers etc, it would make a lovely portable CPU so you could
do real work with it. If, that is, you could load any program you wanted
onto it. Which you can't.

IOW, the tablets have powerful hardware, but inadequate OS and software.
I'm waiting for the penny to drop.

Have a good day.
 
K

Ken Springer

On 2013-07-15 7:37 PM, Ken Springer wrote:

I wrote:
If you detect a bias, you're right. I owned a G-4 PowerBook some years
ago. I now have an iPad loaned me for my work on a board. Both machines
are underpowered and overpriced.

I think anyone who expects a tablet and/or smartphone to have the power
of a computer also would buy beach front property in Arizona, USA!
LOL

But I do expect a tablet to have the power of a laptop. And I expect it
will happen within a couple of years. Or less. A tablet already has more
power than the average PC/Mac of around 10 years ago.
And what kind of power could a desktop have by then? <BG> I don't care
for laptops, hate the #$^%@%&$#*& keyboards! But am considering a
tablet of some type, more as an ereader than anything else. Leaning
towards an iPad Mini, not because it's Apple, but due to the size plus
high screen resolution. [...]
My granddaughter has an iPad mini. She loves it as a camera, and it's
also good for surfing, e-mail, etc over wi-fi. First thing we did when
she visited was to put our home network key on it.

My assessment: It's a more powerful machine than typical
desktops/laptops of 10 years ago. With a wireless keyboard, link to your
smart TV, a port for an external drive, and auto-magic joining to
networked printers etc, it would make a lovely portable CPU so you could
do real work with it. If, that is, you could load any program you wanted
onto it. Which you can't.
The software issue is a hurdle just between desktops. And it's not an
easy task there, either. I'm waiting for iOS 7 to hit the streets
before making any decision.

But you are right about it being a portable CPU, you're points are
exactly the reasons I bought the netbook.
IOW, the tablets have powerful hardware, but inadequate OS and software.
I'm waiting for the penny to drop.
Then you'll have 2 cents to offer???????? said:
Have a good day.

--
Ken

Mac OS X 10.8.4
Firefox 22.0
Thunderbird 17.0.7
LibreOffice 4.0.4.2
 
C

Char Jackson

I know what he asked. I didn't answer because it's been too long since
I compared the two of them and I can't remember the differences. If he
wants to know why it's better, he should try it for himself. If he
doesn't want to, that's OK with me too.
With that glowing and detailed review, I'm not likely to try it, but feel
free to continue to claim that your choice is "better". :)
 
J

J. P. Gilliver (John)

In message <[email protected]>, Ken Blake
And Windows 8? It took me a week or so to get used to the Modern
interface, but getting used to the Desktop Interface with Start8 took
me no time at all. As I've said here more than once, as far as I'm
concerned, with Start8 it's *very* similar to Windows 7.
So you say you did get used to the "Modern interface" (whether it took a
week or however long). So why are you using something else?
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)[email protected]+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

"This situation absolutely requires a really futile and stoopid gesture be done
on somebody's part." "We're just the guys to do it." Eric "Otter" Stratton (Tim
Matheson) and John "Bluto" Blutarsky (John Belushi) - N. L's Animal House
(1978)
 
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J. P. Gilliver (John)

In message <[email protected]>, Ken Springer
One thing that Apple hasn't done, which may lead people to think there
isn't much difference between each OS version, is change the UI design
like MS has. So to that casual observer, they may not notice much
If by "the UI design", you mean the shapes, sizes, and colours of
things, then MS changing those every time (usually to bigger [so you end
up on your new bigger screen only being able to have as many things as
you did before] and more childlike colours) is one of the things that
_has_ irritated me: it makes it difficult to see what has _really_
changed. Oh, and the _positions_ and _names_ of things. (I think 7
improved things slightly in that you _can_ often use the old name for
things - but at the cost of the default access route being a search
facility rather than the older hard menu structure.)
difference between Jaguar and Mountain Lion. And the same UI design is
the same for the upcoming Mavericks.

But the more I play with XP, Vista, Win 7, and Win 8, the more I notice
that the big changes aren't as big as the hype suggests to me. I think
much of that change is in the UI, but each new version has added a few
things. And some of the hype is, IMO, bordering on fraud. Libraries,
for instance. When I saw them, and read the "soundbites", I thought
"This is really something!" Then I got into it, figured it out, and
Yes, I thought it was - via something like Unix (yes Unix, from before
Linux!) links - going to finally get round the problem of wanting to be
able to have something in two places at once but not two copies (so, for
example, I could file the same picture under Mum, Dad, and family,
without using a third-party "album" software that would get confused if
I moved a file without telling it). But it doesn't seem to have done so,
from what I've read here.
[]
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)[email protected]+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

"This situation absolutely requires a really futile and stoopid gesture be done
on somebody's part." "We're just the guys to do it." Eric "Otter" Stratton (Tim
Matheson) and John "Bluto" Blutarsky (John Belushi) - N. L's Animal House
(1978)
 
W

Wolf K

In message <[email protected]>, Ken Blake

So you say you did get used to the "Modern interface" (whether it took a
week or however long). So why are you using something else?
Same reason as me, I suppose: Classic Shell does more than merely
restore the Win XP & prior look'n'feel. Example: it offers direct access
to the whole Control Panel. You can get at the CP via Metro, but it's a
PITA. I've (mercifully) forgotten how to do it. ;-)

Have a good day,
 
K

Ken Springer

In message <[email protected]>, Ken Springer
One thing that Apple hasn't done, which may lead people to think there
isn't much difference between each OS version, is change the UI design
like MS has. So to that casual observer, they may not notice much
If by "the UI design", you mean the shapes, sizes, and colours of
things, then MS changing those every time (usually to bigger [so you end
up on your new bigger screen only being able to have as many things as
you did before] and more childlike colours) is one of the things that
_has_ irritated me: it makes it difficult to see what has _really_
changed. Oh, and the _positions_ and _names_ of things. (I think 7
improved things slightly in that you _can_ often use the old name for
things - but at the cost of the default access route being a search
facility rather than the older hard menu structure.)
difference between Jaguar and Mountain Lion. And the same UI design is
the same for the upcoming Mavericks.

But the more I play with XP, Vista, Win 7, and Win 8, the more I notice
that the big changes aren't as big as the hype suggests to me. I think
much of that change is in the UI, but each new version has added a few
things. And some of the hype is, IMO, bordering on fraud. Libraries,
for instance. When I saw them, and read the "soundbites", I thought
"This is really something!" Then I got into it, figured it out, and
Yes, I thought it was - via something like Unix (yes Unix, from before
Linux!) links - going to finally get round the problem of wanting to be
able to have something in two places at once but not two copies (so, for
example, I could file the same picture under Mum, Dad, and family,
without using a third-party "album" software that would get confused if
I moved a file without telling it). But it doesn't seem to have done so,
from what I've read here.
You're correct, Win 7 libraries, and I presume Win 8 libraries, will not
do that in the manner I think you are referring to. Nor can a library
display selected files from a folder. It's everything in the folder, or
nothing.

However... I do know a work around for that, but don't have the time to
right now to explain it. It's that evil thing called work that I have
to head off too! LOL

--
Ken

Mac OS X 10.8.4
Firefox 22.0
Thunderbird 17.0.7
LibreOffice 4.0.4.2
 
K

Ken Blake

In message <[email protected]>, Ken Blake

So you say you did get used to the "Modern interface" (whether it took a
week or however long). So why are you using something else?

I thought it was obvious, but if you need an explanation, it's because
I greatly prefer it.

Just because I prefer A to B doesn't mean that I can't use B. For
example, I greatly prefer opening screw-cap wine bottles to those with
corks, but I am familiar enough to those with corks to open them
without a problem.
 
K

Ken Blake

With that glowing and detailed review, I'm not likely to try it, but feel
free to continue to claim that your choice is "better". :)

What you try is entirely up to you, But as far as I'm concerned, it's
foolish not to try the competing software. Blindly sticking with what
you tried first and liked and not evaluating the competition
(especially the recommended competition) makes no sense to me. As an
example, my preferred browser is Maxthon, but I've tried IE, Firefox,
Chrome, and several others. And I retry them periodically as new
versions come out.

And I don't suggest that everyone would find Start8 better than
Classic Shell, nor that everyone would find Maxthon better than
Firefox. We all work differently and what's best for one of us isn't
necessarily best for everyone else. But I do suggest that Firefox
users give Maxthon a try and Classic Shell users give Start8 a try.
See for yourself which is better for you.
 
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C

Char Jackson

What you try is entirely up to you,
That's very magnanimous. We should extend that to everyone, not just me.
But as far as I'm concerned, it's
foolish not to try the competing software.
Likewise, it seems foolish to me to continue saying A is better than B after
you've forgotten why you came to that conclusion. Even if you could remember
only the high level details, A isn't necessarily better for everyone even if
it really is better for you. We don't all work alike.
And I don't suggest that everyone would find Start8 better than
Classic Shell,
Actually, I think that's exactly what you've repeatedly claimed. That's why
I finally asked you to defend the claim, which you weren't able to do.
 
C

chicagofan

Robin said:
Here's the Concise Oxford's definition:
nobble
· v. Brit. informal
1 try to influence or thwart by underhand or unfair methods. Ø tamper
with (a racehorse) to prevent it from winning a race.
2 accost (someone).
3 obtain dishonestly; steal. Ø seize.
– ORIGIN C19: prob. a var. of dial. knobble, knubble ‘knock, strike with
the knuckles’.
What a delightful word! Thank you so much for adding to my vocabulary!!!

[Sorry I'm so late on all these posts. Just had to say this.]
bj
 
J

Juan Wei

Mike Barnes has written on 7/14/2013 4:13 AM:
Isn't the answer obvious? When you change your car, even to a different
brand, you don't need significant re-education or to buy new software.
Except for the retraining one needs for the center panel thing!
 
W

Wolf K

Mike Barnes has written on 7/14/2013 4:13 AM:

Except for the retraining one needs for the center panel thing!
What centre panel thing? Oh, you mean the electronic stuff, maybe? If
so, irrelevant, it's just toys.
 
J

Juan Wei

Wolf K has written on 8/8/2013 3:16 PM:
What centre panel thing? Oh, you mean the electronic stuff, maybe? If
so, irrelevant, it's just toys.
For which you paid a few thousand dollars!
 
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C

charlie

Wolf K has written on 8/8/2013 3:16 PM:

For which you paid a few thousand dollars!
Many of the auto mfrs decided to simplify things- How?
Take out the CD/DVD player! It distracts from using touch screens?

I cannot help but wonder - - some of the cars have(or had) the ability
to play video on the center display. Originally, such a display was
considered too distracting, and wasn't supposed to be visible to the
driver while driving. There were even laws to that effect!
 
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