C drive shows not bootable


M

MushroomNZ

Hi

my disk shows 2 patitions

one is 100 MB .this shows active and bootable
2nd C drive is my system drive shows not bootable
these is no BCD subfolder in my C: BOOT folder

i dont think this is normal

can i use the bcdboot command on the command line to make my C drive
bootable. ? does this command build the BCD folder and boot info ?
thanks

had a virus a while back that was repaired this may have done it.
 
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S

Six Underground

Hi

my disk shows 2 patitions

one is 100 MB .this shows active and bootable
2nd C drive is my system drive shows not bootable
these is no BCD subfolder in my C: BOOT folder

i dont think this is normal
This is perfectly normal. The BCD and other files reside
on a reserved system partition that is not assigned a
drive letter. It's accessible from the recovery environment.

IIRC, I once assigned a drive letter to the system
partition with Diskpart for experimental purposes.

Enjoy the day.

6U
 
S

Six Underground

IIRC, I once assigned a drive letter to the system
partition with Diskpart for experimental purposes.
If you decide to try this, ensure that you have the "Hide protected
operation system files" option unticked in explorer. Then go in and
have a look inside the Boot folder. The BCD should be hiding in
there.

6U
 
C

Char Jackson

Hi

my disk shows 2 patitions

one is 100 MB .this shows active and bootable
2nd C drive is my system drive shows not bootable
these is no BCD subfolder in my C: BOOT folder

i dont think this is normal
It's normal. If you look at the partitions in Windows' Disk Management
console, you'll see that the 100MB partition carries the System flag
while the C: partition carries the Boot flag.

That makes sense, since Windows boots from the System partition and
keeps the bulk of its system files on the Boot partition, just about
the opposite of how many of us think it should be, from a labeling
perspective.
 
W

..winston

"MushroomNZ" wrote in message Hi

my disk shows 2 patitions
one is 100 MB .this shows active and bootable
2nd C drive is my system drive shows not bootable
these is no BCD subfolder in my C: BOOT folder

i dont think this is normal

can i use the bcdboot command on the command
line to make my C drive bootable. ? does this
command build the BCD folder and boot info ?
thanks

had a virus a while back that was repaired
this may have done it.
Normal.
The 100 MB is the System Partition/Volume, the other is the Windows 'operating system' partition (Boot Partition/Volume)..normally
these are both on Disk 0 (as shown in Disk Management)

When turning on a pc, your BIOS (on your mobo) instructs your pc what device to use to load and operating system normally telling
it to use Disk 0 and then passing control to the System Partition on Disk 0 which contains the boot manager files and instructions
where to find Windows. Once done, it passes control to the Boot Partition and Windows takes over and finishes the process ending up
at the Windows logon screen or if configured your desktop.

Did a virus do it ? No. Installing Windows created both of those partitions.
 
P

Paul

MushroomNZ said:
Hi

my disk shows 2 patitions

one is 100 MB .this shows active and bootable
2nd C drive is my system drive shows not bootable
these is no BCD subfolder in my C: BOOT folder

i dont think this is normal

can i use the bcdboot command on the command line to make my C drive
bootable. ? does this command build the BCD folder and boot info ?
thanks

had a virus a while back that was repaired this may have done it.
This is normal.

There are actually two ways to install Windows 7.
My Acer laptop uses (1).

1) SYSTEM RESERVED No drive letter, has files used for booting,
exists so BitLocker full disk encryption can
be used. Should be marked as the boot partition.

C: The rest of your installation. This partition
could be encrypted with BitLocker if you wanted
(and you have the version of Windows 7 that
allows it).

*******

2) C: In this case, installing all the files on C: is
not compatible with BitLocker full disk encryption.
Both system and boot files are on the same partition.
Doing it this way, saves a partition. There is an
installation recipe out there, if you want to
install this way.

I don't know how the Windows 7 repair utility, decides what to do
if booting is screwed up. It's got to decide somehow, whether
(1) or (2) was intended, based on the evidence it can find,
and then try and put the files back.

HTH,
Paul
 
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M

MushroomNZ

ok thanks

i thought this was the reason that i cant defrag the drive ?
or get SMART statitics.

CHKDSK says everything is fine.

any ideas ?
 
M

MushroomNZ

well with Seedfan i can get smart data
says its healthy.
freashdiagnose couldnt get it
but when i hit defrag button nothing happens
 
P

Paul

MushroomNZ said:
well with Seedfan i can get smart data
says its healthy.
freashdiagnose couldnt get it
but when i hit defrag button nothing happens
That's weird.

I thought one dependency for Defragmentation is that
the partition be "clean" or CHKDSK clean. But you've
done that (run CHKDSK). Perhaps if the "dirty" bit
was set, you couldn't defrag.

Another reason, might be some kind of permission problem.

It is reported here, that defrag has verbose output.
If you do it from the command line. You could try
that, see it fail, then open the resulting log file
and see what it's whining about. I would open
an elevated command prompt (Start : "cmd" : right click
on the search result and select "Run as administrator")
to run the command.

http://social.technet.microsoft.com...i/thread/A48EF7C3-ECF1-4E14-80B6-1FA37561A10B

To be clear, that command should have some spaces put
in the right places. Something like this perhaps.

C:\Windows\System32\Defrag.exe E: /V > c:\log.log

The first argument, is the drive letter to defrag which
is E:. The /V causes verbose output into the command
prompt window you're using. The ">" redirects StdOut
text into a file. The specification of C:\log.log
isn't exactly a good one, because you're not supposed
to try to write to the root of the drive in Windows 7.
So I might put my log in C:\downloads\dfrglog.txt
instead, with "all my other junk".

As for the path of the executable, you might let the
system find it for you. So maybe this would be
what I'd run, assuming the executable is actually
defrag and not something else like dfrg.

defrag E: /V > C:\downloads\dfrglog.txt

Then later, when it's failed, I'd open the
C:\downloads\dfrglog.txt file and see if there
is anything interesting in there. Windows 7 defrag
does "passes", and the log might normally have
some record of each pass it does.

You don't have to redirect to a log file. You can
also just let it dump in the command prompt window.
But if there is too much text, you could lose some
of it. This would be for not storing it in a file
and just watching the MSDOS window for text output.

defrag E: /V

Just a guess,
Paul
 
M

MushroomNZ

tried what u seggested
all i get is
"Microsoft disk drfragmenter
copyright 2007"

then the prompt comes back.
nothing happens

tried the /U option also which shows progress.same thing
 
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