Bigger dos window in win 7 32 bit


F

FD

I have found a partial solution to lack of full screen in dos program.

(after a lot of googling)

1) Make a short cut of command prompt to desktop

2) Right click - properties - fonts - change to Lucida Console 38 - save

3) Install all dos programs in my users\fd folder

4) Write simple batch files to acces dos programs in their folders.

My programming ability is restricted to writing simple batch files.


On 23 inch lcd wide screen dos window occupies about 90% of real estate

FD
 
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N

Nil

I have found a partial solution to lack of full screen in dos
program.

(after a lot of googling)

1) Make a short cut of command prompt to desktop

2) Right click - properties - fonts - change to Lucida Console 38
- save

3) Install all dos programs in my users\fd folder

4) Write simple batch files to acces dos programs in their
folders.
You can also adjust the size of the window expressed in number of
characters and lines, by adjusting the values on the Layout tab of
Properties. The physical size will vary according to what font you use.
You can do that per shortcut, or as a default.
 
J

James Silverton

You can also adjust the size of the window expressed in number of
characters and lines, by adjusting the values on the Layout tab of
Properties. The physical size will vary according to what font you use.
You can do that per shortcut, or as a default.
If you have a desktop shortcut to Command Prompt, you can use
Properties> Layout
to get a full screen but I can't see why you'd ever want to. The default
80x25 seems enough for me.

--


James Silverton, Potomac

I'm *not* (e-mail address removed)
 
F

FD

If you have a desktop shortcut to Command Prompt, you can use
Properties> Layout
to get a full screen but I can't see why you'd ever want to. The default
80x25 seems enough for me.
Thanks for this infomation.

It is so SIMPLE!

FD
 
G

Gene E. Bloch

If you have a desktop shortcut to Command Prompt, you can use
Properties> Layout
to get a full screen but I can't see why you'd ever want to. The default
80x25 seems enough for me.
I sure like a long screen for commands that have many screens of help
text...

But when that happens, I just stretch the window (via its top edge,
double arrow) up to the top of the screen, and the window jumps to full
height. The bottom edge works too.


Thanks, Nil, for the info about Layout.
 
N

Nil

If you have a desktop shortcut to Command Prompt, you can use
Properties> Layout to get a full screen but I can't see why you'd
ever want to. The default 80x25 seems enough for me.
Well, no you can't. Full-screen command prompt sessions aren't
available any more, since Vista. The best you could do is jigger the
font and layout settings to make the windowed session fill the screen
as much as possible.

Smaller DOS windows are plenty for me, but the OP seems to want or need
full-screen capability, for whatever reason.
 
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B

Bob Hatch

I have found a partial solution to lack of full screen in dos program.

(after a lot of googling)

1) Make a short cut of command prompt to desktop

2) Right click - properties - fonts - change to Lucida Console 38 - save

3) Install all dos programs in my users\fd folder

4) Write simple batch files to acces dos programs in their folders.

My programming ability is restricted to writing simple batch files.


On 23 inch lcd wide screen dos window occupies about 90% of real estate

FD
Once the CMD window is open, press the Start/Window button and either
the right or left arrow at the same time. The CMD screen will stay the
same width, but fill the vertical height of the screen. :)


--
Rumors are carried by haters, spread by fools,
and accepted by idiots.
"Anon"
http://www.bobhatch.com
http://www.tdsrvresort.com
 
R

Roy Smith

Gene said:
I sure like a long screen for commands that have many screens of help
text...

But when that happens, I just stretch the window (via its top edge,
double arrow) up to the top of the screen, and the window jumps to full
height. The bottom edge works too.


Thanks, Nil, for the info about Layout.
You can also drag the bottom edge of a window to the bottom of the
screen and it will make the window expand to the height of your screen
yet preserve the width of the window.

--

Roy Smith
Windows 7 Home Premium 64-Bit
Postbox 3.0.2
Thursday, December 08, 2011 5:56:10 AM
 
D

Dave \Crash\ Dummy

Gene said:
I sure like a long screen for commands that have many screens of help
text...

But when that happens, I just stretch the window (via its top edge,
double arrow) up to the top of the screen, and the window jumps to
full height. The bottom edge works too.
I just redirect everything to a text file. Then I can open it in my GUI
text editor for easy reading. I can also save the file for future
reference, like my CmdSwitch.txt. file.
Thanks, Nil, for the info about Layout.
Ditto, although I'm usually happy with 80x25.
 
G

Gene E. Bloch

You can also drag the bottom edge of a window to the bottom of the
screen and it will make the window expand to the height of your screen
yet preserve the width of the window.
:)

Of course, that is exactly what I meant by "The bottom edge works too";
notice also that I said "the window jumps to full height", not full
screen.
 
G

Gene E. Bloch

I just redirect everything to a text file. Then I can open it in my GUI
text editor for easy reading. I can also save the file for future
reference, like my CmdSwitch.txt. file.
I can't afford to clutter up my 1 GB hard drive with a couple of 1 KB
text files!

Just kidding, of course. I occasionally do what you suggest, but only
when I get confused by my other method :)
Ditto, although I'm usually happy with 80x25.
Actually, it's very rare that I would use the idea, but (if I remember
it when I need it!) it is good to know. Although the use of a text file
would obviate that need as well.
 
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G

Gene E. Bloch

Once the CMD window is open, press the Start/Window button and either the
right or left arrow at the same time. The CMD screen will stay the same
width, but fill the vertical height of the screen. :)
Not for me. I didn't know about that method, but it has the unfortunate
property that the expanded window jumps to one edge of the screen or
the other, which is decidedly not what I want.

The Windows key with the up and down arrows also has effects, BTW, for
those who want to try them, since you might happen to not agree with my
opinion :)
 
S

SC Tom

Dave "Crash" Dummy said:
I just redirect everything to a text file. Then I can open it in my GUI
text editor for easy reading. I can also save the file for future
reference, like my CmdSwitch.txt. file.


Ditto, although I'm usually happy with 80x25.
I have my window set up as 80x40, but I generally make my buffer height 500 or 600. Quite often, a command like
"netstat -a" will run more than 40 lines, but with the large buffer height, I can scroll back to the top of the results.
 
D

Dave \Crash\ Dummy

Gene said:
I can't afford to clutter up my 1 GB hard drive with a couple of 1 KB
text files!

Just kidding, of course. I occasionally do what you suggest, but only
when I get confused by my other method :)



Actually, it's very rare that I would use the idea, but (if I
remember it when I need it!) it is good to know. Although the use of
a text file would obviate that need as well.
The thing is, if you are getting information with a command line switch,
the text is usually output with an 80 character break point, no matter
what the layout is.
 
B

Bob Hatch

Not for me. I didn't know about that method, but it has the unfortunate
property that the expanded window jumps to one edge of the screen or the
other, which is decidedly not what I want.

The Windows key with the up and down arrows also has effects, BTW, for
those who want to try them, since you might happen to not agree with my
opinion :)
Yes, it does jump to one side or the other, depending on arrow button
pushed. A non issue for me. I use this a lot when moving files from one
directory to another. Open one instance of Windows Explorer, place it on
the left and find the destination folder. Open a second instance, and
place it on the right, find the source folder, highlight then drag and
drop.

There are so many ways to do things with the OS I don't think I'll ever
learn them all. :)


--
Rumors are carried by haters, spread by fools,
and accepted by idiots.
"Anon"
http://www.bobhatch.com
http://www.tdsrvresort.com
 
A

Andrew Rossmann

Well, no you can't. Full-screen command prompt sessions aren't
available any more, since Vista.
I thought this wasn't 100% true, but depended on the video driver
offering support. The mainstream ATI/NVidia drivers generally don't, but
supposedly some basic MS drivers might.
 
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G

Gene E. Bloch

Yes, it does jump to one side or the other, depending on arrow button pushed.
A non issue for me. I use this a lot when moving files from one directory to
another. Open one instance of Windows Explorer, place it on the left and find
the destination folder. Open a second instance, and place it on the right,
find the source folder, highlight then drag and drop.
There are so many ways to do things with the OS I don't think I'll ever learn
them all. :)
You've changed the subject :)

I also will, or not, depending on my mood, open windows at the left and
right edges for drag and drop operations, or content comparisons,
whatever. The other mood is just two non-maximized (restored) windows
arbitrarily placed.

But we were talking(or so I thought) about stretching a cmd window
vertically to look at long output streams.

OTOH, you have now caused me to experiment with arbitrary windows, not
only cmd windows, and lo! they also respond to Windows-Arrow key
strikes.

So you have added another useful keyboard shortcut to my armamentarium
- thanks.
 
B

Bob I

Well, no you can't. Full-screen command prompt sessions aren't
available any more, since Vista. The best you could do is jigger the
font and layout settings to make the windowed session fill the screen
as much as possible.
Actually there is a windowed and a maximized size, adjust to taste.
 
R

Roy Smith

Gene said:
:)

Of course, that is exactly what I meant by "The bottom edge works too";
notice also that I said "the window jumps to full height", not full screen.
For me the top of a window moved to the top of the screen maximizes the
whole window (both height and width) and the bottom to the bottom of the
screen just maximizes height. So are you saying that yours is different?

--

Roy Smith
Windows 7 Home Premium 64-Bit
Postbox 3.0.2
Thursday, December 08, 2011 6:39:28 PM
 
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G

Gene E. Bloch

[...]
:)

Of course, that is exactly what I meant by "The bottom edge works too";
notice also that I said "the window jumps to full height", not full screen.
For me the top of a window moved to the top of the screen maximizes the
whole window (both height and width) and the bottom to the bottom of the
screen just maximizes height. So are you saying that yours is different?
There are two different things you can do. Or three, depending on how
you count.

1. Grab the top bar with a left mouse click (while the cursor is a
normal arrow) and drag - up, left, or right.

a. Drag up: When the cursor reaches the top of the screen, the window
expands to full screen.

b. Drag sideways: When the cursor reaches the left edge of the screen,
the window expands to full height, but it occupies the left half of the
screen. Do the same but go right to get a full-height window on the
right half of the screen. I'll sometimes do this to two windows, one
each side, to have convenient windows for drag & drop or for comparing
contents by eye.

2. Put the cursor on the exact top edge of the window until it turns
into a double-headed arrow. Right click and drag it to the top of the
screen. As if by magic, the window becomes full height, but keeps its
current width.

Whatever you have done, grab the top bar (normal arrow) and drag the
window a bit to restore it to its former size and position.
 

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